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The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing

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THE MESH]The Mesh by Portfolio(Author){The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing}Hardcover on 23-Sep-2010 [Hardcover] [Oct 08, 2010] Lisa Gansky … B00430IIUM


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THE MESH]The Mesh by Portfolio(Author){The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing}Hardcover on 23-Sep-2010 [Hardcover] [Oct 08, 2010] Lisa Gansky … B00430IIUM

30 review for The Mesh: Why the Future of Business Is Sharing

  1. 5 out of 5

    Antoinette Perez

    It is a shame this book was so painful to read, because there is some good stuff here, hidden amongst the repetitive, unnecessary business jargon and other distracting tactics. If I could put the book in a pot and boil it down to its valuable essence, we would reduce page count by 80% or a bit more, and eliminate my irritation level entirely. We get it: there are a set of conditions that enable a business to identify itself as a new economy "mesh" business, and because of recent social and econo It is a shame this book was so painful to read, because there is some good stuff here, hidden amongst the repetitive, unnecessary business jargon and other distracting tactics. If I could put the book in a pot and boil it down to its valuable essence, we would reduce page count by 80% or a bit more, and eliminate my irritation level entirely. We get it: there are a set of conditions that enable a business to identify itself as a new economy "mesh" business, and because of recent social and economic trends, a business that focuses on sharing rather than owning has hope for viability and longevity. By citing ZipCars and early in the book as examples of great mesh businesses, I felt deflated on the value of mesh as these companies are not profitable (or flailing, depending on what you read and when you read it). By the second chapter, I was worn out by the lack of structure (what did I just read? What was the point? How was that related to anything else I've read?). But still, I pressed on, and finally cried, "Uncle!" after the author's hundredth desperate attempt to ingrain "mesh" into my business vocab. Do I need to figure out the subtle differences between "big mesh" and "full mesh"? Does "mesh network" need to be compounded into "meshwork" for my personal benefit? If I want my business to be more relevant in this changing landscape, do I really need to make it "meshier", or can I just follow some simple steps to build a stronger business? What is good? The 4 characteristics of mesh businesses; the 7 keys to building trust in the mesh; 3 ways a mesh ecosystem mimics a natural one. There is some valuable background and argument. The rest is one big meshache.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    When I saw this book, the subtitle "Why the future of business is sharing" intrigued me. And since it was very heavily discounted, I decided to pick it up. Basically, The Mesh introduces the concept of, well, the mesh. A "mesh" is basically a business/ecosystem that uses the internet and data to share high-value but (perhaps not very frequently used) things with others. For example, you won't be sharing your old toothbrushes (too low value, too frequently used). But, you may want to swap an old b When I saw this book, the subtitle "Why the future of business is sharing" intrigued me. And since it was very heavily discounted, I decided to pick it up. Basically, The Mesh introduces the concept of, well, the mesh. A "mesh" is basically a business/ecosystem that uses the internet and data to share high-value but (perhaps not very frequently used) things with others. For example, you won't be sharing your old toothbrushes (too low value, too frequently used). But, you may want to swap an old book for a new one (Fairly high value, compared to the toothbrush, at least, and unless you're a serial rereader, you don't read it that many times either). The book introduces the reader to the concept of the Mesh, its advantages, and how businesses can implement it. About 20% of the book is a "Mesh Directory", which was a bit surprising (I was not expecting the book to end so fast). The value of the directory, for me, was in the little explanations about how you can use the concept of the mesh for different industries. While the book is interesting, it's published in 2010 and a bit dated. For example, Kickstarter is described as this new and exciting thing, while it's not - I'd actually like more detail on whether it stuck to its mesh roots, or if it deviated. Singapore is mentioned as being a test-bed for Electronic Vehicles, but I don't see them making up a significant proportion of vehicles in 2015 (Google tells me that the first phase of testing is over, but without the infrastructure, they're just going to be doing phase two of testing. So, not really rolled out to consumers yet?) But, the concept of this book is very alluring. I like the idea of a future where we share things - instead of buying a car, which costs so much in both Japan and Singapore (actually more in Singapore, what with our COE and all), you rent it for the few hours you need, in a location convenient to you. I've been with my seniors when they tried it with Hertz in Japan, but to get to the car was rather inconvenient, in my opinion. Still, I can see how it's useful. And as a bookworm, the idea of swapping books is interesting, though I've had exactly one experience releasing books in BookCrossing, and none finding a book. I think that this book is due for an update. There's been articles in the papers (Singapore papers, anyway) about the rise of swapping sites. I'd like to know how mesh networks are doing four years on. For example, I searched for the author's company, Ofoto, but didn't find much. In fact, I've only heard of Flickr and 500px, and Google+ for photos. Ofoto? Not so much. If I'd read this book when it came out, I'd probably be raving over it. As it is, I like the idea of the book, but quite a few examples feel dated. If the author had an updated edition though, I'd be very interested in reading that. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Fallon

    If you’re interested in the shifts in consumerism and business, then I recommend reading Lisa Gansky’s The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing. Gansky unveils a shift from the traditional “buyer-seller” model to a “sharer-networker” model. And the network is “the Mesh”. The sharing concept isn’t brand new. Hotel and rental cars are based on consumers “sharing” products for specific amounts of time. What’s new is the role that information about the consumer plays. Companies are now able to If you’re interested in the shifts in consumerism and business, then I recommend reading Lisa Gansky’s The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing. Gansky unveils a shift from the traditional “buyer-seller” model to a “sharer-networker” model. And the network is “the Mesh”. The sharing concept isn’t brand new. Hotel and rental cars are based on consumers “sharing” products for specific amounts of time. What’s new is the role that information about the consumer plays. Companies are now able to collect and analyze consumers’ habits in real-time, and make instant changes to their offerings. In fact, many of the companies Gansky profiles consider themselves information companies who provide a product or service. Gansky also explains how this trend is being used by community groups to develop and share resources. Through the use of the internet and social media, people are able to organize effectively and efficiently. And communities are expanded beyond physical proximity to shared interests and passions. Included in the book is “The Mesh Directory” – a listing of Mesh ventures in a wide range of categories – Accessories and Gifts, Arts and Crafts, Books and Writing, etc. You can also browse the list online at www.meshing.it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Juho Makkonen

    Etukäteen olin kuullut kirjasta seuraavan arvion: "The Mesh on vähän kuin samaan aikaan ilmestynyt Rachel Botsmanin ja Roo Rogersin 'What's Mine is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption'. Arvio piti kutinsa varsin hyvin. Ganskyn kirjoitustyyli ei ole yhtä letkeä ja vetävä, eikä hänen lähestymistapansa ole yhtä analyyttinen kuin Botsmanilla ja Rogersilla. Koska kirjat ilmestyivät niin samaan aikaan ja kuvaavat niin samaa ilmiötä, toista ei - Ganskyn epäonneksi - voi mainita ilman toista. Co Etukäteen olin kuullut kirjasta seuraavan arvion: "The Mesh on vähän kuin samaan aikaan ilmestynyt Rachel Botsmanin ja Roo Rogersin 'What's Mine is Yours: The Rise of Collaborative Consumption'. Arvio piti kutinsa varsin hyvin. Ganskyn kirjoitustyyli ei ole yhtä letkeä ja vetävä, eikä hänen lähestymistapansa ole yhtä analyyttinen kuin Botsmanilla ja Rogersilla. Koska kirjat ilmestyivät niin samaan aikaan ja kuvaavat niin samaa ilmiötä, toista ei - Ganskyn epäonneksi - voi mainita ilman toista. Collaborative consumption / sharing economy / the mesh / yhteisöllinen kuluttaminen / jakamistalous / mikä lieneekään on ilmiönä merkittävä, ja on hienoa että siitä kirjoitetaan, mutta Gansky ei saa ilmiöstä otetta. Hän listaa ilmiöön kuuluviksi palveluita kuten LinkedIn ja Groupon, joilla on enää hyvin vähän tekemistä ilmiölle keskeisten asioiden, kuten ihmisten resurssien yhteisöllisen jakamisen ja kestävän kehityksen kanssa. Groupon päin vastoin kannustaa ihmisiä entistä enemmän Botsmanin ja Rogersin kirjassaan kritisoimaan "hyperkulutukseen", jonka vastakohta uusi yhteisöllisempi kuluttamisen muoto on. Ylipäänsä The Mesh pelkistyy lähinnä listaukseksi erilaisia tapoja, joilla verkkoteknologiat ja yhteisöllisyys ovat muuttaneet maailmaa. Moni "case studyista" on itsessään mielenkiintoisia, ja kirja oikeuttaa olemassaolonsa jo niillä, mutta yhtenäiseksi kokonaisuudeksi ne eivät oikein veny. Ganskyn puolustukseksi todettakoon, että luin hänen kirjansa vasta nyt, kun Botsmanin ja Rogersin kirjan sain loppuun jo viime keväänä. Tässä välissä aiheeseen on tullut perehdyttyä sen verran, että vaatimustaso oli varmasti korkeammalla kuin jos kirja olisi ollut ensimmäinen kontaktipintani aiheeseen.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Johann

    As other readers already pointed out, “The Mesh” is an engaging, entertaining read on networked business. However, to write an entire book about that topic was a bit too ambitious and so it falls short of really deep and truly thought provoking ideas that are presented in a succinct way. Others, like Kevin Kelley, do a much better job of outlining the fundamental principles and changes of a networked economy. If you're completely new to the idea of networked business you might like that book, if As other readers already pointed out, “The Mesh” is an engaging, entertaining read on networked business. However, to write an entire book about that topic was a bit too ambitious and so it falls short of really deep and truly thought provoking ideas that are presented in a succinct way. Others, like Kevin Kelley, do a much better job of outlining the fundamental principles and changes of a networked economy. If you're completely new to the idea of networked business you might like that book, if, like me, you're already into the topic, you won't gain too many specific new insights.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Biroscak

    This industry standard book is a fantastic introduction to the Sharing Economy, collaborative consumption, or the Mesh (depending on what you'd like to call it). Recommended for those just beginning their path towards a more shared economy - from a business-person's perspective primarily. For experts, much of this will be too basic, but it's always good to ensure you've covered your bases by reading it cover to cover.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Pynchon

    Worth buying for the first chapter alone (zip cars). Am looking forward to the remainder and the book. Well-paced, well-written and inspirational to any entrepreneur in the 21st century. Highly recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Wellner

    I read the original version, which feels super outdated. Also the subject matter itself in the book is a bit shallow in my opinion. I would rather suggest people interested in this subject to consider reading Platform Revolution by Geoffrey G. Parker et al instead.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Walter

    Every now and then, you pick up a book which offer such a compelling new idea that you simply cannot put down. The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing by Lisa Gansky is one such title. In an increasingly crowded, economically uncertain, and enviromentally damaged world, people are becoming increasingly wary about the financial and personal burden of buying and owning stuff. Aided by social media, wireless networks and data crunched from every available source, people are moving towards sh Every now and then, you pick up a book which offer such a compelling new idea that you simply cannot put down. The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing by Lisa Gansky is one such title. In an increasingly crowded, economically uncertain, and enviromentally damaged world, people are becoming increasingly wary about the financial and personal burden of buying and owning stuff. Aided by social media, wireless networks and data crunched from every available source, people are moving towards sharing goods and services at the point of need. The rule of thumb? Ownership is out. Access is in. These form the precepts behind the futuristic sounding principles of "The Mesh", which is characterised by: 1) Having a core offering that can be shared within a community, market or value chain. These include products, services or raw materials. 2) Using advanced web and mobile data networks to track goods, aggregate usage, customer and product information, and strengthen customer intelligence. 3) Sharing physical goods (including materials used and services procured), which focuses on the local and efficient delivery of services and products. 4) Having offers, news, and recommendations transmitted primarily through the power of Word of Mouth, augmented by social networking services. With a background in entrepreneurship and investment in social ventures, Gansky obviously knows her stuff. This is evident in the book's narrative which intersperses numerous case studies, personal anecdotes and prevailing trends to support it's main thesis. Some of these examples include Roomorama, a peer-to-peer platform for making one's home a short-stay time-share, and Netflix, an innovative social network based business of sharing and listening to one's customers that overcame video giant Blockbuster. A central premise in the book is the concept of making products more resilient so that they could last longer after multiple uses by different members or users. By collecting customer data and preferences, "Mesh" entrepreneurs can also "define, refine, and scale" their businesses accordingly, improving each step of the way. This approach allows users to embrace the "Mesh ecosystem" - an interconnected web linking suppliers, partners and distributors of Mesh products and services. These intermediaries can now leverage on the collective wisdom of the social network and its ability to offer real-time user intelligence. On the issue of customer relationship, Gansky advises that businesses should win back the trust that customers have lost in big business - an unfortunate aftermath of the great financial crisis. To do so, they should embrace the following: 1) Say what they do - manage expectations and revisit them frequently 2) Use trials 3) Do what they say 4) Perpetually delight customers 5) Embrace social networks and go deep 6) Value transparency, but protect privacy 7) Deal with negative publicity and feedback promptly and skillfully So what should entrepreneurs do if they're keen to tap on the opportunities available in "the Mesh". Gansky proposes five ways to forge a competitive advantage in this arena, namely: 1) Providing services or platforms that enable and encourage Mesh businesses, eg Amazon Web Services, PayPal, FedEx, iTunes, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. 2) Leveraging physical assets, both products and materials, as share platforms. 3) Engaging partners by mutually sharing resources and information - including customer feedback and preference - so that products and services could be better designed, more timely and more relevant. 4) Integrating the supply chain both forwards and reverse. Key examples here are Walmart, which has introduced a "reverse supply chain" for the recycling and upcycling of products, and Patagonia, a green oriented supplier of outdoor gear. 5) Extending the Mesh ecosystem to include related products and services. Hotels can work with car and bike sharing services, wguke childcare services can be integrated with clothing exchanges and enrichment programmes. An example is Zipcar (a car sharing service) partnering with Kimpton Hotels and Six Flags amusement parks to reach common markets. To show that there are numerous possibilities out there, the book includes a very useful Mesh Directory (also found here) which showcases a whole range of Mesh businesses. These hail from industries as diverse as books, writing, energy, home exchange, entertainment, travel, kids stuff, home appliances and much more. From the obvious to the obscure, they range from Groupon to Get Satisfaction, thredUP to TechForward and more. If you're keen to find out what the future of consumption and business beholds, The Mesh may just provide a glimpse into that elusive crystal ball. Highly recommended for entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, and anybody with a desire to change the world for the better, with a better way to utilise our fast diminishing resources.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ismail Elshareef

    The book discusses the increasingly recurring themes of openness and platform that have been discussed in other books like Open Leadership by Charlene Li and Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson. The core premise of Mesh businesses is: "When information about goods is shared, the value of those goods increases, for the business, for individuals, and for the community." The author says that, "fundamentally, the Mesh is based on network-enabled sharing--on access rather than ownership. The The book discusses the increasingly recurring themes of openness and platform that have been discussed in other books like Open Leadership by Charlene Li and Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson. The core premise of Mesh businesses is: "When information about goods is shared, the value of those goods increases, for the business, for individuals, and for the community." The author says that, "fundamentally, the Mesh is based on network-enabled sharing--on access rather than ownership. The central strategy is, in effect, to "sell" the same product multiple times. Multiple sales multiply profits, and customer contact. Multiple contact multiply opportunity--for additional sales, for strengthening a brand, for improving a competitive service, and for deepening and extending the relation with customers." The book also references a recent study, which concluded that, "a recommendation from a "trusted source" like a friend or family members was fifty times more likely to persuade someone to buy a product or try a new brand. The same study reported that word of mouth is the "primary factor" behind between 20 and 50 percent of purchases, and emphasized the expanded role of information networks in driving this development." --- WHAT IS THE MESH The 4 Characteristics of a Mesh Business as listed in the book are: Sharing a high code, frequently used goods Advanced Web and Mobile Information Networks Focus on Physical Goods and Materials Engage with Customers Through Social Networks "The Mesh model is based on a series of transactions, on sharing something over and over. Creating a share platform is the first, necessary-but-not-sufficient building block of the Mesh. The second is to create information infrastructure that takes advantage of mobile, Web, and social networks. Then each interaction, and transaction, becomes an opportunity to gather and exchange information with a customer." The 7 Keys to Building Trust in the Mesh: Say What You do Use Trials Do What You Say Perpetually Delight Customers Embrace Social Networks and Go Deep Value transparency, but protect privacy Deal with negative publicity and feedback promptly and skillfully WHY THE MESH Tomorrow's business leaders recognize that trust in a business's environmental and social practices increasingly drives informed consumers' decisions. Successful Mesh businesses harness information from customers, combine it with data from physical products and social networks, and then use that information to satisfy customers, and their friends, in ways never before dreamed of. Good Mesh businesses are smart about combining more frequent customer contact with enhanced information sources to create and refine superior experiences, partnerships, products, and offers. MESH COMPANIES HIGHLIGHTS Zipcar is one of the companies profiled in the book. The author says that, "The robust information platform and focus on building the brand distinguished Zipcar from early car-sharing companies that were merely long on good intentions, many of which failed. In fact, Zipcar is primarily an information business that happens to share cars." So if you're in the information business, you are a Mesh business whether you realize it or not. TCHO, a chocolate company in SF, produces "beta editions" of its dark chocolate. "Based on customer feedback and continuous flavor development, new versions of the chocolate emerge as often as every thirty-six hours. Version 1.0 went through 1,026 iterations in a year." Why did Netflix slaughter Blockbuster? Blockbuster was late in acknowledging customer resentments, and late in understanding the spreading power of social networks to shape brand perception. They created a share platform, but neglected other elements that make Mesh businesses so competitive. This is an excellent book that could help realign the business perspective on how to succeed in the future. Embracing openness, sharing and focusing on customer satisfaction are some of the key practices that could catapult your business from mediocre to stellar now and in the future.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Theo Kokonas

    I’m currently working for an advertising agency in Brick Lane. They’ve got a great stack of books lying about (the product of a rarely mentioned book-swapping culture) so I decided to pick up a book with a fancy cover for my latest read: The Mesh by Lisa Gansky. The basic premise behind the book is there’s a new business movement around “sharing”. We’ve got to the point where materialism only gets us so far; when we acquire things cost of ownership is high and we don’t necessarily take our full a I’m currently working for an advertising agency in Brick Lane. They’ve got a great stack of books lying about (the product of a rarely mentioned book-swapping culture) so I decided to pick up a book with a fancy cover for my latest read: The Mesh by Lisa Gansky. The basic premise behind the book is there’s a new business movement around “sharing”. We’ve got to the point where materialism only gets us so far; when we acquire things cost of ownership is high and we don’t necessarily take our full advantage of them, they then depreciate rapidly. Enter the concept of sharing – you use something for as long as you need when you need it and pay only for that use. That’s the concept right there. I like it. Pretty straightforward and very logical. There are plenty of good examples cited (such as car sharing) and the author puts together a list of business which encapsulate this approach. Reading the book I couldn’t help thinking that the points could easily be covered within a blog article, or a sequence of blog articles rather than a full-on hardcover book. Also, the premise seems to be peddled as if it’s some kind of revolutionary concept when really it’s been around for years. The idea of labelling it as ‘meshing’ or business being ‘mesh businesses’ sounds a little cheesy. The most value I found from the book is the author’s recounting of the recent history of web commerce. She writes of how the first wave of internet companies focused on sharing information between parties i.e. selling an email service. The next wave involved companies figuring out ways of making money by selling specific information to 3rd parties. An example given is Google selling a search terms i.e. the term ‘deadbolt’ being sold to an online hardware store that offers locks. The wave after that involved social networking empowering customers to become more active in shaping products and services. Businesses not pushing stocks of inventory but rather offering goods and services in the time, place and manner that they want. One thing I particularly liked was the author’s condemnation of the throwaway culture, by specifying that Mesh design is Durable (products that last longer), Flexible (Products that can cover more than just one function), Reparable (standardized parts and transparent design), Sustainable (Reusing materials and reduces waste). The biggest benefit of reading the book was the effect it had on me; it created an impetus for thinking more creatively about my own business venture that’s getting off the ground. Probably not so much the book content but the passion the author instilled in me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Annie Smidt

    OK, this is what I'm talking about. Progressive, thought- and innovation-provoking, useful. Gansky outlines the ramifications of network-enabled sharing of assets, both tangible and intangible (i.e., goods, like Zipcar and ideas/information of a million ilks, new models for banking, ownership, collaboration). She peppers the book with hundreds of examples of this new model in action, across markets, disciplines and geographies. She clearly illustrates how companies beholden to old-school, proprie OK, this is what I'm talking about. Progressive, thought- and innovation-provoking, useful. Gansky outlines the ramifications of network-enabled sharing of assets, both tangible and intangible (i.e., goods, like Zipcar and ideas/information of a million ilks, new models for banking, ownership, collaboration). She peppers the book with hundreds of examples of this new model in action, across markets, disciplines and geographies. She clearly illustrates how companies beholden to old-school, proprietary, outbound, cutthroat traditions of doing business will be left in the dust in a new world of transparency, sharing and sustainable models. These ideas are newly re-enabled and revamped in the internet age, but they're old ideas. They're how humans operated up until recently, in a lot of ways. It's village life, helping thy neighbor, thrift, making things to last and fixing them when they break. It's looking even beyond cradle to cradle. I do think this is the way the economy is going — at least the smart players in it. It's inevitable and it is good. It is hopeful. I worry about the conservatism of the US though (not even in the political sense, but more generally). America is terrified of sharing. We think it makes us socialists. Or worse, communists. We think that any deviation from pure capitalism is blasphemy. But the world can no longer support pure capitalism as we have known it. We need more sustainable models, and they involve sharing. But look at countries without the fundamental fear of crossing the borders of -isms... they have healthcare for all. Some have affordable higher education for all. These aren't kibbutzim, this is, like, Scandinavia. But I digress. Point being, I do think that America's past 50 years of hyper-consumerism and worship of capitalism will serve us badly as the early adopters of sharing-based business and community models speed ahead. At any rate, I found this book extremely timely, dense with concrete examples and things to check out online. It's written as a business book — explaining the characteristics of a "mesh" business, presumably so you can create one yourself. However, I think it's an instructive reader for non-entrepreneurial observers of our culture and economy as well. PS: Gansky's book covers the same territory as I've heard Rachel Botsman speak about, though she's not mentioned, as far as I remember in "The Mesh". Very eager to read Botsman's book as well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Will

    The Internet is a wonderful thing. In the 20-odd years since we have gotten used to email, websites, instant messaging and spam, the world has taken to the idea of being connected wholesale. I cannot imagine a facet of life nowadays that doesn’t have an online presence. Even my Mum shops online now! It is this world that Lisa Gansky has written her new book ‘Mesh’, to demonstrate that there is still a world of development and progress that we can make in the virtual world. Whereas, Web 1.0 gave u The Internet is a wonderful thing. In the 20-odd years since we have gotten used to email, websites, instant messaging and spam, the world has taken to the idea of being connected wholesale. I cannot imagine a facet of life nowadays that doesn’t have an online presence. Even my Mum shops online now! It is this world that Lisa Gansky has written her new book ‘Mesh’, to demonstrate that there is still a world of development and progress that we can make in the virtual world. Whereas, Web 1.0 gave us the ability to connect across continental distances, so Web 2.0, and soon Web 3.0 will give us all a space in a digital world that connects us in a way humans never have up until now. ‘Mesh’ takes the idea of total connectivity and aligns it with a business model that attaches customers not only to the online service or product that they are initially wanting, but two secondary and even tertiary products and services that maybe of use. It’s silver lining are the many case studies littered throughout the book that highlight the many different types of crowdsourced / sharing businesses that can be built using the new Web. Collaboration in business is nothing new, but the difference this time is that this can now be done for minimal cost over the web. An example given is car-sharing service Zipcar. Why own a car when you can rent a vehicle for the time that you actually need it, freeing up your garage for its true purpose – storing household boxes of ‘stuff’. The way that the internet is organised allows the car rental place to ally with a payment service (a la Paypal), and a Geo-Locating site to optimise the need of transport with the availability of vehicles. It is this sort of collaboration that will typify the future of online transactions as consumers become more fixed about the sort of trade they’re willing to make. Overall I found this book to provide a good grounding in future sharing businesses utilising the connectivity of the Web in providing a shared, collaborative vision of the future. Lisa Ganksy has hit a number of nails with her book, and connecting the socialbility of Man with the shared-business opportunities identified show that we are already living in the Mesh.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I picked up this book because it was mentioned in some article - "librarians know The Mesh." It is a helpful description of the popular trend of share-platform businesses (think Netflix and Zipcar) and how to determine a niche and how to get your business venture into the Mesh through social networking. I liked the author's reminders that this new way of doing businesses - providing expensive products for people to use and share - is very green and economical. However, after reading these same p I picked up this book because it was mentioned in some article - "librarians know The Mesh." It is a helpful description of the popular trend of share-platform businesses (think Netflix and Zipcar) and how to determine a niche and how to get your business venture into the Mesh through social networking. I liked the author's reminders that this new way of doing businesses - providing expensive products for people to use and share - is very green and economical. However, after reading these same points needlessly reiterated in chapter after chapter, I began to skim. The biggest flaw? No mention of public libraries, even though we invented this platform (but don't do it for a profit) and have been doing it for hundreds of years. If you're interested in Mesh businesses, skip the book and check out the website instead - http://meshing.it/ - there's a great directory of meshy businesses and other ventures.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dave Emmett

    A great look at how sharing is changing business. I think this is a must-read for anyone starting a business today, in order to understand how technology and social values are shifting away from the ownership model and more towards temporary use of items. Zipcar and Netflix are the best examples of this so far, but the book discusses a bunch of other smaller companies which are finding successful niches. My favorite example from the book is ThredUp, which lets parents swap their kids clothes once A great look at how sharing is changing business. I think this is a must-read for anyone starting a business today, in order to understand how technology and social values are shifting away from the ownership model and more towards temporary use of items. Zipcar and Netflix are the best examples of this so far, but the book discusses a bunch of other smaller companies which are finding successful niches. My favorite example from the book is ThredUp, which lets parents swap their kids clothes once they grow out of them. It's simple and obvious, and it looks like they're doing really well. From the standpoint of ideation for new businesses, the book covers why some ideas are suited to be meshed, but others don't do as well. I think it would be hard to read this without having a few ideas for areas that are prime to be meshed, so if you're looking for a great business idea, you could do worse than read this.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ola

    Book describes the idea of businesses and initiatives based on network and sharing. Shows possibilities of re-using things and resources we have. May be an eye-opener in our times when people focus on having things for their own that in a lot of cases is unnecessary and wasteful. The author tries to prove (in a successful way in my opinion) that creating Meshes allows to achieve better results, better customer satisfaction and easier life with lower costs and in the way more favorable and less p Book describes the idea of businesses and initiatives based on network and sharing. Shows possibilities of re-using things and resources we have. May be an eye-opener in our times when people focus on having things for their own that in a lot of cases is unnecessary and wasteful. The author tries to prove (in a successful way in my opinion) that creating Meshes allows to achieve better results, better customer satisfaction and easier life with lower costs and in the way more favorable and less painful for our environment. In our reality, with high technology, Internet and other wireless solutions we can create extremely useful networks than ever before. Book worth reading, not only to people who think about starting or expanding their own business but also for customers and members of societies (so for all of us, each of us is a member of a society, like for example his/her neighborhood).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    The Mesh is the new way that people and companies are doing business. Businesses appeal to users (often offering incentives to get their opinions/feedback) and use the information they receive from and about their customers to refine and improve the services they offer. Products are shared, repairable, and/or recyclable. Information is shared between businesses. Initial costs are kept down by using existing infrastructures for payment, shipping, communication etc. Lisa Gansky gives many examples The Mesh is the new way that people and companies are doing business. Businesses appeal to users (often offering incentives to get their opinions/feedback) and use the information they receive from and about their customers to refine and improve the services they offer. Products are shared, repairable, and/or recyclable. Information is shared between businesses. Initial costs are kept down by using existing infrastructures for payment, shipping, communication etc. Lisa Gansky gives many examples of successful businesses that have made use of these techniques to grow and prosper – Zipcar, Groupon, Netflix, ThredUp, etc. Exciting! You’ll want to go through the resources at the end and make note of sites to bookmark/businesses to check out, and budding entrepreneurs will be fired up about this business model. This came out in 2010, so there are probably even more mesh businesses in existence today.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Basemah

    As Seth Godin said this book at Long Tail potential.The idea that we have gone from using the internet to sharing bits to sharing atoms whether that be spare rooms in our house to unused cars sitting in our driveway to charging others for idle hours in our day is very provocative. All of this has become possible through mobile technology, GPS, and social networks. The companies that build these networks increase the number of transactions with customers, learning more and find ways to better ser As Seth Godin said this book at Long Tail potential.The idea that we have gone from using the internet to sharing bits to sharing atoms whether that be spare rooms in our house to unused cars sitting in our driveway to charging others for idle hours in our day is very provocative. All of this has become possible through mobile technology, GPS, and social networks. The companies that build these networks increase the number of transactions with customers, learning more and find ways to better serve them. Sharing means a completely different design mentality, one that emphasizes sturdy construction for repeated use and flexibility for varied usage. Gansky doesn't have Chris Anderson's platform but I hope her bringing together these ideas under one roof in The Mesh helps this insight find a wider audience.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    Great ideas about sharing and networking and how it can improve communities and the lives of individuals. There's a nice section at the end of the book with resources organized by interest categories like "art", "travel", "education" etc that is very helpful. This book offers a look at a future of sharing resources and working together to make our lives better. It also illustrates the positive impact the internet can have on the world. If you are trying to start a business, read this book to lea Great ideas about sharing and networking and how it can improve communities and the lives of individuals. There's a nice section at the end of the book with resources organized by interest categories like "art", "travel", "education" etc that is very helpful. This book offers a look at a future of sharing resources and working together to make our lives better. It also illustrates the positive impact the internet can have on the world. If you are trying to start a business, read this book to learn about new types of products and services people are craving and great ideas on how to deliver those goods. If you already have a business, read this book to learn how to adapt your business to meet the changing needs of your customers.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Considering that I'm reading a 5 year old business book that predicted what companies would succeed in the future, the information is pretty spot on. It was a relatively quick read, but a tad bit dry. As per usual, the book is from an American standpoint, but some Canadian cities were included in examples. Great information and insight into what the world is looking for now. She stated a lot of statistics and studies that I would have liked to see footnoted or referenced. As a science person thi Considering that I'm reading a 5 year old business book that predicted what companies would succeed in the future, the information is pretty spot on. It was a relatively quick read, but a tad bit dry. As per usual, the book is from an American standpoint, but some Canadian cities were included in examples. Great information and insight into what the world is looking for now. She stated a lot of statistics and studies that I would have liked to see footnoted or referenced. As a science person this is what kept me from giving her 5 stars. You NEED to cite your sources when you are providing the general public with information. Otherwise great read on the future of consumerism, why companies like Zipcar are thriving, and how we can take advantage of this new trend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Massello

    Lisa Gansky's brainchild, The Mesh, "has emerged as the best new creative engine for getting more of what we want, exactly when we want it, at less cost to ourselves and the planet." I was thrilled to be mentioned for The Swapaholics alongside our friends at ThredUp and Rent the Runway as major disruptors in the fashion business who are "creating a world where access trumps ownership." Featured in Required Reading: Self-Reliance, Sewing, Sharing & Swapping on ShoestringMag.com

  22. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I thought it was a good business book, and cleverly describes the most obvious trends of the next few decades. I gave it three stars not because of the quality of the content or the nature of the writing (flippant but engaging) but because the layout was such that a two-page spread of special information would be inserted into a chapter, often in the middle of a sentence, which made me flip back and forth a lot to remind myself what the author had been talking about. Worse yet, these asides were I thought it was a good business book, and cleverly describes the most obvious trends of the next few decades. I gave it three stars not because of the quality of the content or the nature of the writing (flippant but engaging) but because the layout was such that a two-page spread of special information would be inserted into a chapter, often in the middle of a sentence, which made me flip back and forth a lot to remind myself what the author had been talking about. Worse yet, these asides weren't in the same place in the chapter as the part of the main text that referenced them; they were usually several pages later. Other than that, it was quite an enjoyable read, especially for a book on business.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Hornik

    Is it self-dealing to review a book when you're quoted on the back? If so, I'm guilty. What I'm quoted as saying on the back of The Mesh is "Gansky's book is an important read for anyone who cares about the planet or is looking to make a ton of money." I firmly believe it. I am a fan of the many emerging businesses in what is now being called "collaborative consumption" (e.g., RelayRides, AirBnB, etc.). They make good sense economically and they are certainly better for the world. Lisa Gansky wa Is it self-dealing to review a book when you're quoted on the back? If so, I'm guilty. What I'm quoted as saying on the back of The Mesh is "Gansky's book is an important read for anyone who cares about the planet or is looking to make a ton of money." I firmly believe it. I am a fan of the many emerging businesses in what is now being called "collaborative consumption" (e.g., RelayRides, AirBnB, etc.). They make good sense economically and they are certainly better for the world. Lisa Gansky was well ahead of the curve on this trend and her book is an excellent primer on what she calls "the mesh." Well worth a read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    While reading about all the great examples of businesses that use Mesh, I found Goodreads! I kept of imagining all the possibilities of this business concept and though I have not grasped a niche that I believe will be utterly successful, I know that mesh businesses may be a way to go. Other than details of the book, I specifically enjoyed Gansky's idea because she was able to support it with various current examples. While reading the book, I was searching online for the websites that she menti While reading about all the great examples of businesses that use Mesh, I found Goodreads! I kept of imagining all the possibilities of this business concept and though I have not grasped a niche that I believe will be utterly successful, I know that mesh businesses may be a way to go. Other than details of the book, I specifically enjoyed Gansky's idea because she was able to support it with various current examples. While reading the book, I was searching online for the websites that she mentions, and found myself thinking, over and over again that the business ideas were simply fantastic.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Though The Mesh opens the door to a new way of thinking about business in the new decade, author Lisa Gansky struggles only in her ability to make the actual book read as wonderfully as her idea does. Gansky has, without a doubt, offered a perspective on business that is bound to influence many other authors, innovators, and entrepreneurs; The Mesh concept is well-supported by a sack full of terminology, examples, and ideals. The book is a quick read, but it is unnecessary to read from cover to Though The Mesh opens the door to a new way of thinking about business in the new decade, author Lisa Gansky struggles only in her ability to make the actual book read as wonderfully as her idea does. Gansky has, without a doubt, offered a perspective on business that is bound to influence many other authors, innovators, and entrepreneurs; The Mesh concept is well-supported by a sack full of terminology, examples, and ideals. The book is a quick read, but it is unnecessary to read from cover to cover - borrow a copy from a friend, read the first few chapters, and then pass it along: ultimately, that's what Gansky wants you to do anyways.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Excellent book that captures the zeitgeist of the coming business revolution. The combination of a push for more sustainable products that take into account TCO, a focus on experiences not stuff, the idea of the long tail, social networks, the data revolution and tech innovations that commidify large tech backends (Cloud Services, SaaS, Amazon Web Services, GetSatisfaction, etc) make it easier that ever to create a new "mesh" business focused on satisfying the consumer. Lisa Gansky deftly and su Excellent book that captures the zeitgeist of the coming business revolution. The combination of a push for more sustainable products that take into account TCO, a focus on experiences not stuff, the idea of the long tail, social networks, the data revolution and tech innovations that commidify large tech backends (Cloud Services, SaaS, Amazon Web Services, GetSatisfaction, etc) make it easier that ever to create a new "mesh" business focused on satisfying the consumer. Lisa Gansky deftly and succinctly explains how and why the future of business is sharing for both start ups and old standard businesses.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    This is a must read book on what is in store for us for the future. Sharing resources online and offline is a growing business model that has pushed traditional business aside (Netflix vs. Blockbuster). Showing how others have done it, Lisa Gansky shows many different models and the corresponding pitfalls and successes. Learning a new way of doing business that is really an old way of doing business brought back to life by global connectivity could transform your future planning. Definitely pick u This is a must read book on what is in store for us for the future. Sharing resources online and offline is a growing business model that has pushed traditional business aside (Netflix vs. Blockbuster). Showing how others have done it, Lisa Gansky shows many different models and the corresponding pitfalls and successes. Learning a new way of doing business that is really an old way of doing business brought back to life by global connectivity could transform your future planning. Definitely pick up a copy of this book, the addendum of "Mesh" websites in the back of the book is worth the purchase price alone. simply, Tim

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steve Bivans

    You're running a business, any business, small, large, or enormous, and you haven't read Gansky's book? You're in trouble. The world is moving on, and the old model of 'we make it, we spin it, you buy it, you throw it away,' is gasping its last breath. Gansky lays out the new business model for the 21st Century, and it's not some huggy-wuggy, theoretical model either; businesses all over the world are making millions following the new way and if you aren't, well, see ya later Dino, or Dodo, or s You're running a business, any business, small, large, or enormous, and you haven't read Gansky's book? You're in trouble. The world is moving on, and the old model of 'we make it, we spin it, you buy it, you throw it away,' is gasping its last breath. Gansky lays out the new business model for the 21st Century, and it's not some huggy-wuggy, theoretical model either; businesses all over the world are making millions following the new way and if you aren't, well, see ya later Dino, or Dodo, or some other such extinct thing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    I am familiar with very small scale lending and CSA farming, and the unregulated craziness that is Freecycle's jackals and the mob of tree-squatting, child-abandoning foragers that is Craigslist, but this book makes the case that technology, in the form of third party administration (which can charge enough to be profitable) ratings backed up by financial and choice penalties make viable enterprises as varied as tool libraries, children's clothing exchanges, groupon, Zipcars, make your own wine I am familiar with very small scale lending and CSA farming, and the unregulated craziness that is Freecycle's jackals and the mob of tree-squatting, child-abandoning foragers that is Craigslist, but this book makes the case that technology, in the form of third party administration (which can charge enough to be profitable) ratings backed up by financial and choice penalties make viable enterprises as varied as tool libraries, children's clothing exchanges, groupon, Zipcars, make your own wine co-ops, apartment swaps and peer-to-peer microlending.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    This was a quick read 'cause the last 1/4 of the book is a PRINT directory of Mesh businesses/sites like...Goodreads. Which just about sums up the entire Achilles' Heel of this book: It's late, it's in print where it should be an ongoing discussion, and it's mostly just condensing and summarizing what anyone can figure out from looking at, say, Zipcar or Netflix or crowdsourcing. That said, sometimes it's nice to have a pithy summary that reminds you these businesses did not always exist and doi This was a quick read 'cause the last 1/4 of the book is a PRINT directory of Mesh businesses/sites like...Goodreads. Which just about sums up the entire Achilles' Heel of this book: It's late, it's in print where it should be an ongoing discussion, and it's mostly just condensing and summarizing what anyone can figure out from looking at, say, Zipcar or Netflix or crowdsourcing. That said, sometimes it's nice to have a pithy summary that reminds you these businesses did not always exist and doing the thinking for you.

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