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The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction features over a 150 years' worth of the best science fiction ever collected in a single volume. The fifty-two stories and critical introductions are organized chronologically as well as thematically for classroom use. Filled with luminous ideas, otherworldly adventures, and startling futuristic speculations, these stories will appe The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction features over a 150 years' worth of the best science fiction ever collected in a single volume. The fifty-two stories and critical introductions are organized chronologically as well as thematically for classroom use. Filled with luminous ideas, otherworldly adventures, and startling futuristic speculations, these stories will appeal to all readers as they chart the emergence and evolution of science fiction as a modern literary genre. They also provide a fascinating look at how our Western technoculture has imaginatively expressed its hopes and fears from the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century to the digital age of today. A free online teacher's guide accompanies the anthology and offers access to a host of pedagogical aids for using this book in an academic setting. The stories in this anthology have been selected and introduced by the editors of Science Fiction Studies, the world's most respected journal for the critical study of science fiction.


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The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction features over a 150 years' worth of the best science fiction ever collected in a single volume. The fifty-two stories and critical introductions are organized chronologically as well as thematically for classroom use. Filled with luminous ideas, otherworldly adventures, and startling futuristic speculations, these stories will appe The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction features over a 150 years' worth of the best science fiction ever collected in a single volume. The fifty-two stories and critical introductions are organized chronologically as well as thematically for classroom use. Filled with luminous ideas, otherworldly adventures, and startling futuristic speculations, these stories will appeal to all readers as they chart the emergence and evolution of science fiction as a modern literary genre. They also provide a fascinating look at how our Western technoculture has imaginatively expressed its hopes and fears from the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century to the digital age of today. A free online teacher's guide accompanies the anthology and offers access to a host of pedagogical aids for using this book in an academic setting. The stories in this anthology have been selected and introduced by the editors of Science Fiction Studies, the world's most respected journal for the critical study of science fiction.

30 review for The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Babcock

    How do you even review a 760-page book comprising 52 short stories that is meant to offer a comprehensive look at the genre for the purposes of teaching? I don’t know. The Ben of seven years ago would have rated each story out of 5 stars and taken the average, but ain’t nobody got time for that these days. It took me over a year to read this anthology—because if I had torn straight through it, I might have torn out my hair. I’m not built for anthologies; I need the slow, simmering build-up of nov How do you even review a 760-page book comprising 52 short stories that is meant to offer a comprehensive look at the genre for the purposes of teaching? I don’t know. The Ben of seven years ago would have rated each story out of 5 stars and taken the average, but ain’t nobody got time for that these days. It took me over a year to read this anthology—because if I had torn straight through it, I might have torn out my hair. I’m not built for anthologies; I need the slow, simmering build-up of novels and sweet, sweet payoff of character development. That being said, it is a truth universally acknowledged that the short story form is where one can find some of the best and brightest science fiction. The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction certainly proves this. I could try to highlight my very favourite stories, but that would still probably be excessive. At 52, there is a lot to choose from. There are only 14 women authors in the selection, but I think it’s admirable the editors tried to include several earlier women who were at the forefront of early SF publishing. Moreover, as we get into the 1960s onwards, quite a few more women authors put in an appearance. While I think the editors might have done a little better, this anthology is far from being an all-male panel, and I appreciate that. Before I get into talking about some of the individual stories, however, I also want to mention that this book comes with two tables of contents. The first is a chronological listing, which is how the stories are organized in the actual text. The second table of contents is a thematic listing, along the lines of “Alien Encounters”, “Apocalypse and Post-apocalypse”, etc. This is a sweet idea, especially because this is obviously a teaching anthology. (The inclusion of a link to a teaching guide helps with that last part, too.) I read the stories chronologically, which has its own benefits, but I could easily see someone choosing to read, say, all the stories about “Time Travel and Alternate History” to get a brief overview of some of those ideas. The introduction provided before each story is great too. It gives me just enough information about each author, including highlights of their works, without overstaying its welcome. I also like how it introduces the specific piece without spoiling too much. The actual introduction to the overall book is your typical university course textbook introduction: if you are a student of a course, it’s probably something you want to read so you can quote from it in your midterm paper. Otherwise, you are probably wise to skip it. Unless you can’t sleep? OK, but since you really want to know some favourites…. I liked a lot of the early ones just because I have not read as much early SF, so it was nice to expose myself to these stories and their styles. “Rappaccini’s Daughter” is fascinating just because of its age. I am familiar, of course, with the tracing of the provenance of SF back towards Frankenstein, but it was nice to learn about an almost-as-old story I hadn’t heard of. I also enjoyed “Thunder and Roses”, by Theodore Sturgeon, so obviously inspired by the military life during the Second World War. The collection includes some classics, like Cordwainer Smith’s “The Game of Rat and Dragon” (which, to be honest, I’m not much of a fan of) and one of my favourite time travel stories, the amazing “‘All You Zombies—’”, by Robert Heinlein, which also features some very interesting titular punctuation. And who can forget “We Can Remember It for You Wholesale”, by Philip K. Dick? Maybe one of the more useful aspects of this anthology for someone who is not a student is the exposure to authors I mean to read but haven’t yet. For example, Carol Emshwiller, Pat Cadigan, and Kate Wilhelm are all on my list. Wilhelm’s “Forever Yours, Anna” is a neat time-travel story, and while “‘All You Zombies—’” is an elegant depiction of paradox, there is just something so beautiful about Wilhelm’s time travel mystery/romance. I recall enjoying this story and not wanting it to end, far more so than a lot of the entries in this collection. I don’t think there are any bad stories in this collection. There are some I didn’t personally like much, but even then I can see their merit as stories and works of literature; it’s just that neither their characters nor their plots held my interest. Perhaps half the fun of this book is arguing with the other people who have read it which stories are the best (the other half being bludgeoning your opponent with the sheer weight of this tome—definitely the definition of a doorstopper). As a teacher, I love collections like this. It’s well-rounded, clearly carefully curated. I don’t get much of a chance to teach science fiction short stories in my English classes, though I tend to sneak some in there when I can (I love opening a unit on short stories with Vanessa Torline’s “#TrainFightTuesday” just because it is so deliciously atypical in its form). Still, this is a great resource, both in how it augments my understanding of the genre as a whole, and in its ability to offer up story ideas no matter what theme or era I’m interested in covering at the moment. Definitely recommend for teachers, SF fans who want to dive deeper, and people with doors that keep closing on them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Curtis

    As an attempt to offer a survey of (mostly 20th century) short science fiction, this anthology is quite successful. Since with a book like this it's almost impossible to make any significant assessment that doesn't boil down to simply preference, I will simply list those stories I liked best out of the collection, followed by some choice quotations. Stories I liked Please do not take this list as an endorsement that only these stories should be read. All of the stories in this book are worth read As an attempt to offer a survey of (mostly 20th century) short science fiction, this anthology is quite successful. Since with a book like this it's almost impossible to make any significant assessment that doesn't boil down to simply preference, I will simply list those stories I liked best out of the collection, followed by some choice quotations. Stories I liked Please do not take this list as an endorsement that only these stories should be read. All of the stories in this book are worth reading. These are just the ones that struck me in a particular way. They are listed in chronological order (the order they appear in the book). "Rappaccini's Daughter" – Nathaniel Hawthorne "The Machine Stops" – E. M. Forster "Shambleau" – C. L. Moore "Reason" – Isaac Asimov "Desertion" – Clifford D. Simak "That Only a Mother" – Judith Merrill "There Will Come Soft Rains" – Ray Bradbury "Fondly Fahrenheit" – Alfred Bester "All You Zombies—" – Robert A. Heinlein "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" – Harlan Ellison "The Heat Death of the Universe" – Pamela Zoline "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long" – Brian Aldiss (way better than the movie A.I. that was based on it) "Nine Lives" – Ursula K. Le Guin "Speech Sounds – Octavia Butler "Forever Yours, Anna" – Kate Wilhelm "Computer Friendly" – Eileen Gunn "Useful Phrases" – Gene Wolfe "Closer" – Greg Egan "Everywhere" – Geoff Ryman "Exhalation" – Ted Chiang Quotations (Taken out of context, not necessarily related to the list above, and presented in the order they appear.) Why spend physical energy in combative strife for something we do not wish…? – "The Conquest of Gola," Leslie F. Stone No planet, no universe, is greater to a man than his own ego, his own observing self. – "Thunder and Roses," Theodore Sturgeon I finally realized that I was not speculating about masks in general, but about what lay behind one in particular. That's the devil of the things; you're never sure whether a girl is heightening loveliness or hiding ugliness. – "Coming Attraction," Fritz Leiber …but there are times when a scientist must not be afraid to make a fool of himself. – "The Sentinel," Arthur C. Clarke …the old are often insanely jealous of the young. – "The Sentinel," Arthur C. Clarke Live in the world around you. – "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman," Harlan Ellison …but face it, most of the things we call "sexy" are symbolic, you know, except perhaps an exhibitionist's open fly. – "Day Million," Frederik Pohl It is people that make stories, not the circumstances they find themselves in. – "Day Million," Frederik Pohl There are times when you must walk by yourself because it hurts so much to be alone. – "Aye, and Gomorrah…," Samuel R. Delany "I want you because you can't want me." – "Aye, and Gomorrah…," Samuel R. Delany We can't afford to tease and run. – "Passengers," Robert Silverberg An overcrowded world is the ideal place in which to be lonely. – "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," Brian Aldiss Did repetition of the individual negate individuality? – "Nine Lives," Ursula K. Le Guin When one culture has the big guns and the other has none, there is a certain predictability about the outcome. – "When it Changed," Joanna Russ Nobody wants to spend eternity alone. – "Closer," Greg Egan You know, all the evil in the world, all the sadness comes from not having a good answer to that question: what do I do next? – "Everywhere," Geoff Ryman …through the act of reading my words, the patterns that form your thoughts become an imitation of the patterns that once formed mine. And in that way I live again, through you. – "Exhalation," Ted Chiang

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    I grew up reading anthologies like this... from throwaway "year's best" books and themed groupings by the editor-of-the-month, to the enduring greats by editors like Groff Conklin, Anthony Boucher, Terry Carr, Robert Silverberg, Isaac Asimov and Ben Bova. This book, I think, would stand up well in comparison to any of these... Spanning more than a century, The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction collects carefully-chosen short stories from authors ranging from Nathaniel Hawthorne in 1844, thro I grew up reading anthologies like this... from throwaway "year's best" books and themed groupings by the editor-of-the-month, to the enduring greats by editors like Groff Conklin, Anthony Boucher, Terry Carr, Robert Silverberg, Isaac Asimov and Ben Bova. This book, I think, would stand up well in comparison to any of these... Spanning more than a century, The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction collects carefully-chosen short stories from authors ranging from Nathaniel Hawthorne in 1844, through Ted Chiang in 2008, and every one is a solid, justifiable choice. While the editors' introductions to the stories are sometimes a bit too dry and academic, it is a teaching anthology, after all. There is a second table of contents arranged by theme, as well as an extensive bibliography. And while many of the stories herein have previously been collected elsewhere, I found it fun to revisit the ones I'd already read... and there were several gems I had not run across before. It makes me a little sad to see how many of the writers in this volume have already passed away (each Introduction carefully includes both birth and, where applicable, death dates for each author); this is most definitely a backward-looking volume. Very few of the authors included here were born after 1960. Nevertheless, this solid compendium would be a fine introduction to science fiction for just about anyone, and has something to offer even to seasoned veterans in the field.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    A great collection of sci-fi stories. It includes many classics you might have already read, but would enjoy reading again, and many stories that should be classics some day. It works hard to include many different sub-categories of sci-fi, and includes lots of information on each author and historical background to help understand the stories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Sas

    Reading for The Mythgard Institute's Science Fiction Part II course. Only certain stories are required, but I'd love to go through them all. Read so far: - "Repent, Harlequin!" said the Ticktockman. - Ellison - We Can Remember It For You Wholesale - Dick -Aye, and Gomorrah - Delaney - When It Changed - Joanna Russ - Speech Sounds - Octavia Butler - Exhalation - Ted Chiang

  6. 5 out of 5

    Haley Muñoz

    My Bible

  7. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

    Wonderful anthology. Enjoyed most of the stories and loved a few of them.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Akemi G.

    Fifty-two authors, from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Ted Chiang, with one of their short stories (or excerpt from a longer story in some cases). They are presented in chronological order, but the book also categories them by the theme, so I'll review each theme along with the story I like: Alien Encounters The Sentinel by Arthur C. Clarke Among the stories that strive to present yet another weird creatures, this classic shines. Robert Silverberg's Passengers was interesting, too. Apocalypse and Post-apoc Fifty-two authors, from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Ted Chiang, with one of their short stories (or excerpt from a longer story in some cases). They are presented in chronological order, but the book also categories them by the theme, so I'll review each theme along with the story I like: Alien Encounters The Sentinel by Arthur C. Clarke Among the stories that strive to present yet another weird creatures, this classic shines. Robert Silverberg's Passengers was interesting, too. Apocalypse and Post-apocalypse The Star by H.G. Wells Okay, another classic . . . but I like the last paragraph. Artificial / Posthuman Life-forms Mary Shelley's Frankenstein should be here, but the book ignores it in favor of Hawthorne's Rappaccini's Daughter, which is well-written, but consider this: Rappaccini, a scientist, doesn't intentionally change his daughter's nature, whereas Dr. Frankenstein intentionally assembles his monster. To me, it's clear which qualifies more as SF. Among the stories included in this anthology, I like Reason by Isaac Asimov and Super-Toys Last All Summer Long by Brian Aldiss. Computers and Virtual Reality The previous category for AI overlaps with this category; it seems the anthology wanted to put cyberpunks in another group. Pat Cadigan's Pretty Boy Crossover presents an interesting question about mortality (or immortality). Evolution and Environment This is another messy category. Obviously, the environmental concerns are present in apocalypse stories as well, and evolution is often told in posthuman stories. Also, somewhere there must be animal evolution (or new animals) category; it's not just humans that evolve. I'll mention Clifford Simak's Desertion here. (It's a mystery to me how the author got away with a title like this in 1944.) Gender and Sexuality The Heat Death of the Universe by Pamela Zoline The experimental style takes a bit of getting used to it, but it's brilliant. I might start using this story to verify men. Closer by Greg Egan More about identity in posthuman existence. Time Travel and Alternate History Time travel stories tend to be shallow, and in my opinion, there needs to be a good theme besides it to make the story work. John Varley's Air Raid fills the bill; also about evolution. Btw the best time travel novel I know is Replay. Just one Alt History story ... Utopias/Dystopias The Machine Stops by E.M. Forster According to this anthology, this is the only SF Forster wrote. A bit unusual (like the spoiler title) but it's insightful. War and Conflict Don't know why this category is set up separately from apocalypse . . . And I'm rather surprised there aren't any stories about new types of mass-destruction weapons, such as biochemical. We See Things Differently by Bruce Sterling Although the author missed a few points, such as not expecting Japan's decline (in the story, the US is in economic decline; then Japan has to go down as well because it thrived by trading with the US) and the political demagogue /rock star being black (the band features the original US flag; such group, as we know by now, would likely be white suprematist), his assessment is quite accurate, and the story is brilliant. All in all, it's a delight to see such variety of voice and style. Excellent volume to get to know science fiction and the major authors (especially older ones).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sheri Fresonke Harper

    A good mix of science fiction short stories showing an almost year by year progression of short stories starting with a tale written in 1844 by Nathaniel Hawthorne and concluding with Exhalation by Ted Chiang. I got a serious case of the giggles from Stanislaw Lem's "The Seventh Voyage" from Star Diaries. The only story I had read before was Ray Bradbury's "There Will Come Soft Rains". This collection contains a good mixture of writings from both men and women and contains a variety of themes fr A good mix of science fiction short stories showing an almost year by year progression of short stories starting with a tale written in 1844 by Nathaniel Hawthorne and concluding with Exhalation by Ted Chiang. I got a serious case of the giggles from Stanislaw Lem's "The Seventh Voyage" from Star Diaries. The only story I had read before was Ray Bradbury's "There Will Come Soft Rains". This collection contains a good mixture of writings from both men and women and contains a variety of themes from apocalyptic, aliens, evolution, computer and technology, war, time travel. The anthology staff wrote very helpful introductions for each writer that explained their contributions to science fiction.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    I read this book for an online course that I took, and I found myself enjoying the book far more than I originally thought I would. It is composed of fifty-two short stories, most of which were taken from the 1950s [it seemed], but ran the gamut from 1844 to 2008 [although we did not read the Jules Verne story for the class, I read it anyway]. The format was fairly easy; the stories were listed in the order they were published. There were biographical blurbs at the start of each story and commen I read this book for an online course that I took, and I found myself enjoying the book far more than I originally thought I would. It is composed of fifty-two short stories, most of which were taken from the 1950s [it seemed], but ran the gamut from 1844 to 2008 [although we did not read the Jules Verne story for the class, I read it anyway]. The format was fairly easy; the stories were listed in the order they were published. There were biographical blurbs at the start of each story and comments by the editors expressing their thoughts on the author and the story in question. Some of the blurbs, comments, and questions were fairly leading, as if the editors were trying to 'make a point' and not let the story speak for itself. I think the 'weakest' part of the book was having the blurbs at the start of the story instead of at the end of the story. I think the bio stuff and the editorial comments and/or questions would have had 'more impact' [as it were] had they been at the end of each story instead of at the start. Reading that stuff before the story kinda ruined the effect of reading the story because now you have a preconceived misconception about what the story will be about because you are now biased toward it [well, you may be biased, or you may not, but the comments will influence the story to some degree]. Overall, I really enjoyed reading this anthology and enjoyed most of the stories listed therein. Some were phenomenally good and some were real stinkers, but I still enjoyed reading all of them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Skjam!

    This is a collection of SFnal short stories designed to give an overview of the field for a college level literature course. It's arranged chronologically by year of publication, from 1844 (Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Rappachini's Daughter") to 2008 (Ted Chiang, "Exhalation".) Most of these are "classic" or "important" stories, though the Jules Verne entry is a bit of a cheat, being just an excerpt from "Journey to the Center of the Earth." I was surprised to see how many of the later stories I actual This is a collection of SFnal short stories designed to give an overview of the field for a college level literature course. It's arranged chronologically by year of publication, from 1844 (Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Rappachini's Daughter") to 2008 (Ted Chiang, "Exhalation".) Most of these are "classic" or "important" stories, though the Jules Verne entry is a bit of a cheat, being just an excerpt from "Journey to the Center of the Earth." I was surprised to see how many of the later stories I actually had read or heard (via podcast) before; I really haven't kept up with the latest developments in the field. In general, the selection is strong, but a couple of the more "experimental" stories barely qualify as speculative fiction, let alone science fiction. This tends to irritate me, and I remember feeling the same way the first time I read at least one of those stories. A specific effort has been made to include female authors and writers of color, which is much appreciated, and led to the inclusion of one of the stories I hadn't seen before: Leslie F. Stone's, "The Conquest of Gola." Overall, I'd recommend this book to any adult science fiction fan, and precocious teenagers (later stories tend to veer into mature themes.) Even the stories that irritate me are well-written, and may suit readers with less orthodox tastes than mine. For more science fiction reviews, see http://www.skjam.com/tag/science-fict...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    This was a tough one to get through. 700+ pages of disconnected stories. It is a great overview of Science Fiction, and that is probably its purpose as a book. There are many great stories in here, but they are over too quickly. This is one of those books were one would read it over the coarse of a year, just picking one or two stories a week. Or a textbook for a Sci-Fi Lit class. Many of the stories in this book I encountered in my own Sci-Fi Lit class (The Machine Stops and Repent, Harlequin! This was a tough one to get through. 700+ pages of disconnected stories. It is a great overview of Science Fiction, and that is probably its purpose as a book. There are many great stories in here, but they are over too quickly. This is one of those books were one would read it over the coarse of a year, just picking one or two stories a week. Or a textbook for a Sci-Fi Lit class. Many of the stories in this book I encountered in my own Sci-Fi Lit class (The Machine Stops and Repent, Harlequin! said the Ticktock man), and that is the biggest reason I bought the book. It was also very interesting to read early "science fiction" works from Nathaniel Hawthorne and of course Jules Verne and HG Wells. As what happens with many anthologies with established authors, the later stories include samplings of works that seem more directed at the fans than newcomers. I enjoy reading short stories about people or places I am familiar with. These "where are they now" stories remind me of those greater stories. But they do not make strong introductions to these authors. They either leave me lost or are too short to grab my attention (rather than leaving me wanting more).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    I originally checked this book out because it was the only one in the library system that had "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" (aka the story that Total Recall was based on). I got it in November and finally had to return it today. It was a wrench to give it back. It took me so long to read not because the stories weren't great, but because I would read the some of the same ones over and over, enjoying the worlds created by different authors. I didn't want to move on to other stories. Of co I originally checked this book out because it was the only one in the library system that had "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" (aka the story that Total Recall was based on). I got it in November and finally had to return it today. It was a wrench to give it back. It took me so long to read not because the stories weren't great, but because I would read the some of the same ones over and over, enjoying the worlds created by different authors. I didn't want to move on to other stories. Of course, as in all short story collections, some stories were amazing and some made me never want to read SF again. One story in particular was so smug that I felt almost sick after reading it. Some didn't make me feel the sense of wonder that I often get from SF. There were definitely some surprises (Forster of Room with a View fame writing SF?), and there were some that made me wish I was a teacher so that I could give people these stories to read, hoping it might help them see something new about themselves and their world. I might have to buy this one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    It is a good anthology that represents most of the popular authors, writers, and themes in the SF genre, though some of the stories were not entertaining or thought-provoking. I have used this anthology to teach a college-level literature course, and found that I still wanted a few stories from other anthologies as better representations of the writing by well-known authors, such as LeGuin, Asimov, Clarke, and Octavia Butler. My primary complaint with the anthology, which I passed on to my stude It is a good anthology that represents most of the popular authors, writers, and themes in the SF genre, though some of the stories were not entertaining or thought-provoking. I have used this anthology to teach a college-level literature course, and found that I still wanted a few stories from other anthologies as better representations of the writing by well-known authors, such as LeGuin, Asimov, Clarke, and Octavia Butler. My primary complaint with the anthology, which I passed on to my students, is with the introduction text for the stories; some of this material gave too much of the story away and ruined the intrigue. (Note: Students new to the genre may appreciate the insights since they don't have an extensive knowledge of SF context, though it would be ideal to read the intro text after reading the story.) As an instructor, I do appreciate the teaching guide and other resources available on the publisher's website.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    An excellent anthology of science-fiction that was on my reading list for my History of Science Fiction class at UCR. My teacher is one of the editors (Rob Latham). This anthology has a good scope of genres and time periods. I would recommend it to ANY SF lover or anyone looking to get into SF. -Favourites- from "Journey to the Center of the Earth" by Jules Verne "The Star" by H.G. Wells "The Machine Stops" by E.M. Forster "The Man Who Evolved" by Edmond Hamilton "Shambleau" by C.L. Moore "Desertion" b An excellent anthology of science-fiction that was on my reading list for my History of Science Fiction class at UCR. My teacher is one of the editors (Rob Latham). This anthology has a good scope of genres and time periods. I would recommend it to ANY SF lover or anyone looking to get into SF. -Favourites- from "Journey to the Center of the Earth" by Jules Verne "The Star" by H.G. Wells "The Machine Stops" by E.M. Forster "The Man Who Evolved" by Edmond Hamilton "Shambleau" by C.L. Moore "Desertion" by Clifford D. Simak "There Will Come Soft Rains" by Ray Bradbury "The Sentinel" by Arthur C. Clarke "The Liberation of Earth" by William Tenn "Passengers" by Robert Silverberg "The Seventh Voyage" from "The Star Diaries" by Stanislaw Lem

  16. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    "Though I am long dead as you read this, explorer, I offer to you a valediction. Contemplate the marvel that is existence, and rejoice that you are able to do so. I feel I have the right to tell you this because, as I am inscribing these words, I am doing the same." – Ted Chiang, "Exhalation" Fabulous, fantastic collection of science fiction stories. A total must for anyone interested in the genre and in the history of the genre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Disclaimer - I did not read the whole anthology, only certain selections. A enjoy anthologies, any kind of anthology. With that said SciFi is not my favorite genre. As a matter of fact I have read very little over the years, but this anthology is the best of the best and offers a taste without long term commitment. I particularly enjoy the short introduction to the authors. If you like anthologies and/or SciFi, I would recommend picking this one up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven Yenzer

    What a great collection! I struggled for awhile to find an anthology of science fiction that could give me a basic introduction to the genre. This one is big, varied, and comes with short but sweet introductions to each story. Most of the major writers are included here, with some less well-known authors thrown in as well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tylr-r

    Great overview of the SF genre, from the 1850s to now. As a person who had only read modern SF, it gave me some perspective on how the genre came to be and how it evolved with brief bios on the authors, as well as some historical context. While usually used as a textbook, it would be an enjoyable read for anyone interested in the genre.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Excellent anthology spanning the history of science fiction from classics to 2008. Detailed introductions to the authors and their work as well as further suggested reading gives a great jumping off point for anyone looking to explore the genre further. Definitely worth reading, so many great stories.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    This is an amazing anthology. I was totally enthralled by this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Desiree Rico

    had to read this text for my science fiction fantasy class and loved it.so many stories that changed my preconceptions of what sci-fi is.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    Good collection that illustrates the history of science fiction.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Contains so many of my favorites. Lighthearted "Golem" to "There Will Come Soft Rains." A consistent favorite.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Love the wide range and the thematic linkages. Comprehensive and sweeping and highly enjoyable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Quinn Armitt

    Took a while to get through this one but it was perfect throughout. Great collection.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ziona

    I think this is a really well rounded anthology

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Really more like 4.+ - A really good anthology. And an interesting eclectic collection. Got it initially to read "the machine stops"; and the older stories I had read, and enjoyed. But 1940s forward they were very good stories - and many I had not read - despite reading MANY other anthologies. The lead-in writeouts were interesting - but too focused toward the editors agenda (college course)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Here is an amazing collection of SF short stories from writers both renowned and unknown, from 1844 to the present day. Each story reveals a sub-genre of SF, each highlights and illustrates the concerns of its day, and each speaks to a desire for different, better, other. Gender is a performance, the machine is outside and inside, power is for the taking regardless of who you are. A wonderful journey through the evolution of the SF genre.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Great collection of SF stories. Read about half of them for my science fiction class, and the other half for fun. "Exhalation" is probably my favorite story, by Ted Chiang, but there's a lot of great ones.

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