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The Rainbow Fish

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The Rainbow Fish is an international bestseller and a modern classic. Eye-catching foilstamping, glittering on every page, offers instant child-appeal, but it is the universal message at the heart of this simple story about a beautiful fish, who learns to make friends by sharing his most prized possessions, that gives the book its lasting value.


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The Rainbow Fish is an international bestseller and a modern classic. Eye-catching foilstamping, glittering on every page, offers instant child-appeal, but it is the universal message at the heart of this simple story about a beautiful fish, who learns to make friends by sharing his most prized possessions, that gives the book its lasting value.

30 review for The Rainbow Fish

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kat Kennedy

    I'm always on the look-out for new, well-written children's books for my son. We had been reading him: Help! Mom! There Are Liberals Under My Bed! and Why Mommy is a Democrat. He loved the story and drawings! However, he didn't seem to take to them as much as I thought he would...so I decided to find something else as informative, well-balanced and fun to read with my child. Then I came across The Rainbow Fish by Macrus Pfister. The Rainbow Fish is a story about a spectacular fish with amazing sca I'm always on the look-out for new, well-written children's books for my son. We had been reading him: Help! Mom! There Are Liberals Under My Bed! and Why Mommy is a Democrat. He loved the story and drawings! However, he didn't seem to take to them as much as I thought he would...so I decided to find something else as informative, well-balanced and fun to read with my child. Then I came across The Rainbow Fish by Macrus Pfister. The Rainbow Fish is a story about a spectacular fish with amazing scales. Soon, other - boring fish - come and request a scale from the fish who turns them all down. The boring fish leave, causing the Rainbow Fish to be lonely. The Rainbow fish goes on a journey to discover why the other fish don't like him. The Rainbow Fish is soon told by the octopus that it is because he won't share his amazing scales. The Rainbow Fish then goes to the other fish and gives them his scales. Eventually all the fish have a shiny scale and the Rainbow Fish now has only one shiny scale left as well. The fish all play together happily. The end. Fantastic! A book about learning. Isn't that brilliant? I suggest that you go buy this book for your children. It's important that your children realize that it is NEVER okay to be different from other children. After all, we as people are not allowed to be stronger/weaker, smarter/less intellectual, creative/logical, physically, spiritually or emotionally better than others. In fact, we should ALL be the same. And it's also important that you teach your children that, in life, they are entitled. If someone has something more - then it is okay to expect that they give it to you. In fact, you should shun them if they don't. If you work hard and have much - please remember you must share it all. Even if you don't want to. Don't expect to be liked just for your personality. You must give everything you have to ensure that you are liked. Nothing is worse than being unliked. Don't let you children think differently or it could go very badly for them. Your individuality is not precious and there is no degree to which it can't be compromised in order to make people like you. Remember. WHO you are - your morals, intellect, personality and charm aren't nearly as important to you as they are to other people. Never be afraid to give away any part of yourself in order to be liked. Just like: See! Even culture can be bastardized to fit in! Maybe I am being the grinch. Maybe I am bespoiling a perfectly good children's book. Or maybe I'm just wondering what the world would be like if all the Rainbow Fish gave away their pretty scales until there weren't any Rainbow Fish anymore... Just think... we could all look like this! Who wants to share an earring?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laila

    Ahem. Nice little book that teaches sharing, or subtle liberal socialist propaganda which teaches to give away all and anything special about yourself or what you have for the betterment of the whole? You might think I'm being ridiculous, but I was a bit alarmed at this children's book when a professor in a teaching class read it to us aloud. Basically, Rainbow Fish is special because, unlike the other fish, he is special and has many colors of the rainbow on his fins. The other fish grow jealous Ahem. Nice little book that teaches sharing, or subtle liberal socialist propaganda which teaches to give away all and anything special about yourself or what you have for the betterment of the whole? You might think I'm being ridiculous, but I was a bit alarmed at this children's book when a professor in a teaching class read it to us aloud. Basically, Rainbow Fish is special because, unlike the other fish, he is special and has many colors of the rainbow on his fins. The other fish grow jealous and hostile and demand that Rainbow Fish give away his beautiful scales to the others so they can have part of his beautiful colors. He refuses at first, but then yields, giving away the colored fins to all the other fishes so they each have one or two colored scales, thus equalizing the entire school. Rainbow fish is no longer special, but is happier having given this unique characteristic away because the other fish are now happy and accepting of him. Are you kidding me? This is basically telling kids that if they have something special, they should share it so that everyone is equal. But then, no one is special. It's very much like the socialist belief that if you have a skill or make more money, that money should not belong to you, the one who has it or has earned it; you should not be able to do with this as you please--which very well may be to help others. No. You are to give this away for the betterment of the group because they demand that you do so. Nobody should have any kind of special thing or advantage. Nobody should make more money than someone else or have nicer things, because it upsets people and they won't like you then. Well, too bad! Uniqueness, individuality, and independence or the very qualities that spur new ideas and new inventions which affect the greater whole for the better without the weight of dictatorship and being told to do something. A child should want to share because it is the innately right thing to do. They should want to do so out of kindness, not out of fear of reproach. For a children's book that appears to at first be about sharing, this book is good at conveying the lesson that people will always look down on others and want what they have for their own. I disagree with this moral and will not read it to my children to teach sharing, but to teach the points above--when they are old enough to understand the difference between sharing and ceding.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Petra X

    I've just read a one-star review of this book that was, to me, highly amusing. It has been one-starred because the reviewer thinks it is nothing but socialist propaganda, in other words it's going to lead toddlers and little children straight down the Red Road to Communism. I'm pretty sure the reviewer is American since no one in Europe would actually care whether it was socialist propaganda or not, socialism being a perfectly acceptable political philosophy there. Indeed many governments have b I've just read a one-star review of this book that was, to me, highly amusing. It has been one-starred because the reviewer thinks it is nothing but socialist propaganda, in other words it's going to lead toddlers and little children straight down the Red Road to Communism. I'm pretty sure the reviewer is American since no one in Europe would actually care whether it was socialist propaganda or not, socialism being a perfectly acceptable political philosophy there. Indeed many governments have been socialist, and why not? It's only another variant of capitalism as practised. Anyway, it was an enjoyable review so if you'd like to read it for yourself it's here Leila's review

  4. 4 out of 5

    ♥ℂĦℝΪՖƬΪℕÅ

    2 Rainbow Fish ★'s *A BEAUTIFUL book that has an UGLY message!* I absolutely loved this book when I was in elementary school. But looking back now, I don't think I completely got the "message" that I do now. Back then I was just so enthralled by the illustrations because well let's face it the artwork is gorgeous and sparkly. I thought it was a book that teaches kids the fundamentals in sharing and making friends and giving of oneself. But at last, that is not the case. The little Rainbow Fish b 2 Rainbow Fish ★'s *A BEAUTIFUL book that has an UGLY message!* I absolutely loved this book when I was in elementary school. But looking back now, I don't think I completely got the "message" that I do now. Back then I was just so enthralled by the illustrations because well let's face it the artwork is gorgeous and sparkly. I thought it was a book that teaches kids the fundamentals in sharing and making friends and giving of oneself. But at last, that is not the case. The little Rainbow Fish basically has to give away EVERYTHING that makes him uniquely special so that all the other fish will be his friend. Therefore the fish give's away all of his pretty scales to all the jealous fish. This. Is. Not. Sharing. This is giving up everything that makes you-you, to cut yourself into pieces, and then give them away--because other fish want what you have. Say WHAT? How on earth is this fair or giving young kids the right message? It's not, it's teaching children that they have to change who they are just to make others like you and to be happy. I really just didn't like the fact that he gave away his scales. Sure the Rainbow Fish needed an attitude adjustment. But what does giving up parts of yourself have to do with your personality? :(

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yusra ✨

    all I remember is reading this over, and over, and over, and over as a child. don’t remember what it’s about, but I loved it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Or: How to Buy Friends Who Were Jealous of You Don't get me wrong, I'm all for teaching kids to share and to not act like little snots. But there's something disturbing in the idea that Rainbow Fish has to give away all but one of his beautiful sparkly scales (toys, possessions) to the other jealous fishies so they'll be his friends.

  7. 4 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    I'm all into sharing and stuff, but this little guy was basically told that he had to give away everything that made him special just so other fish wouldn't be jealous and mean. Is this fair? Heck no! Reminds me of one of my favorite lines from The Incredibles, when Dash says something along the lines of, "If everybody's special, then NOBODY is."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vivian

    This is another one of the books that horrified me when I read it to a younger family member without pre-reading. Another, you are a bad adult moment. I still can't believe how popular this book is with the self-crippling message it espouses. Everyone says, this is all about sharing and isn't that wonderful. We all want children to learn the value of community and sharing. These are basic tenets of being a social animal and being in a group. Admirable goal without a doubt. That's not this book's This is another one of the books that horrified me when I read it to a younger family member without pre-reading. Another, you are a bad adult moment. I still can't believe how popular this book is with the self-crippling message it espouses. Everyone says, this is all about sharing and isn't that wonderful. We all want children to learn the value of community and sharing. These are basic tenets of being a social animal and being in a group. Admirable goal without a doubt. That's not this book's message. THIS isn't sharing. This is: give up everything about you, dissect yourself into pieces, and give them away--because others are jealous. It is one of the most horrifying conformist and self-sacrificing books I've read and it is geared to children! Teaches children to be ashamed of themselves and change who they are to make other people happy. It's a pretty book that hides an ugly message.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Janni

    A chilling tale about a young fish who learns that no one will ever like him--until he gives up the thing that makes him unique and becomes just like everyone else. Of a genre with The Giving Tree and the stalker classic Love You Forever.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I also thought the message in this book was not good for children. We have to give things to people so they will like us? What? Sure, this book is trying to teach about friendship and giving of oneself, but where in the book do the other fish stop being selfish and jealous? Those are not qualities that should be rewarded, and the poor rainbow fish has to give away all of his lovely scales to jealous, hateful fish. Just awful. I think it would be a lot different if the other fish were in "need" o I also thought the message in this book was not good for children. We have to give things to people so they will like us? What? Sure, this book is trying to teach about friendship and giving of oneself, but where in the book do the other fish stop being selfish and jealous? Those are not qualities that should be rewarded, and the poor rainbow fish has to give away all of his lovely scales to jealous, hateful fish. Just awful. I think it would be a lot different if the other fish were in "need" of something instead of just being jealous.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

    I'm fairly hard pressed to truly dislike a children's book, but the message of this story is awful. This beautiful and unique fish meets some horribly jealous fish who won't befriend him. In order to be accepted, the rainbow fish must give up all of his scales to bribe the other fish to be his friends. What kind of message does this send to a child? I could see a child, having experienced unkind treatment, deciding to give away all her favorite toys trying to become popular on the playground bas I'm fairly hard pressed to truly dislike a children's book, but the message of this story is awful. This beautiful and unique fish meets some horribly jealous fish who won't befriend him. In order to be accepted, the rainbow fish must give up all of his scales to bribe the other fish to be his friends. What kind of message does this send to a child? I could see a child, having experienced unkind treatment, deciding to give away all her favorite toys trying to become popular on the playground based on the "lesson" in this story. This story is not about sharing. It is about buying the love of others, conformity, and making poor choices in friends. (It also hasn't escaped me that perhaps it is intended to a communist allegory. Anyone?)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Read this with my daughter. The sparkly fins on the fish were cute and caught her attention and story was a good one about how to share with others and how it will make you happy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Toph

    I just reread this with my sister in Barnes and Noble today! I remember loving this story as a kid, probably because of the sparkles. Now, even though I appreciate the book's message that being beautiful doesn't excuse rudeness, I have a problem with how the Rainbow Fish has to give away his scales to be redeemed. The lesson shouldn't necessarily be to give away something you have that makes you special (not really possible to give away beauty in real life, anyways); rather, it should be to resp I just reread this with my sister in Barnes and Noble today! I remember loving this story as a kid, probably because of the sparkles. Now, even though I appreciate the book's message that being beautiful doesn't excuse rudeness, I have a problem with how the Rainbow Fish has to give away his scales to be redeemed. The lesson shouldn't necessarily be to give away something you have that makes you special (not really possible to give away beauty in real life, anyways); rather, it should be to respect other people who may not have the same qualities as you and are special in other ways. Still giving this book a 4 because nostalgia ;)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Clouds

    My wife and I had previously discussed the way this kids book makes us feel uncomfortable. The moral of the story seems to be that if you do not give away whatever makes you special, you will never have any friends. So imagine the big goofy grin on my face when I check it out on GoodReads and see several of my GR friends indulging in scandalized rants about the socialist propaganda hidden within these seductive cardboard pages...! I'm not going to go that far. It's really a very sweet little story My wife and I had previously discussed the way this kids book makes us feel uncomfortable. The moral of the story seems to be that if you do not give away whatever makes you special, you will never have any friends. So imagine the big goofy grin on my face when I check it out on GoodReads and see several of my GR friends indulging in scandalized rants about the socialist propaganda hidden within these seductive cardboard pages...! I'm not going to go that far. It's really a very sweet little story, with lush painted images skilfully enhanced with shimmery foil - my little boy is now 3 and he's loved this one for the last year or so he's had it. But still... something just feels off. Sharing is all well and good, and we encourage our kids to share and play nicely - but that's not what happens here. The little blue fish asks for one of the rainbow fishes shiny scales, and when he refuses to give away his beloved scales, all the other fish ostracise him... and that's OK? If the story was about a rainbow fish who voluntarily decided to donate his scales to enrich the lives of his friends, I'd be well on-board with that. But he only does it to make the other fish like him... and that's not what we want to teach our kids. So, a 1-star from me dragged up to a 2-star by the boy's enthusiasm for all things rainbow-fishy...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    My daughter has already asked me to read this several times since checking it out form the library. I like that the vocabulary is not as dumbed down as in most modern children's books. I can see and somewhat appreciate some people's problem with the book as being a sort of socialist piece of propaganda that uniqueness is unacceptable and everyone must be brought down to the same level. On the other hand...it could instead be a Christian message. I have no idea whether or not the author is Christ My daughter has already asked me to read this several times since checking it out form the library. I like that the vocabulary is not as dumbed down as in most modern children's books. I can see and somewhat appreciate some people's problem with the book as being a sort of socialist piece of propaganda that uniqueness is unacceptable and everyone must be brought down to the same level. On the other hand...it could instead be a Christian message. I have no idea whether or not the author is Christian, but the message could be that, as Jesus taught, you have to lose yourself to find yourself, a little more complex than your typical "be nice and share" book. It is similar to the story of the rich man in the Gospels, who asks Jesus what he must do to be saved. Jesus tells him to go and sell everything he owns, and give to the poor, but the rich man goes away sad, because he cannot part with his idol of wealth. For Rainbow Fish, his idol is his shiny fins, which make him haughty. When the Octopus tells him he must give them away, Rainbow Fish, like the rich man, balks and says, "I can't..." But eventually he learns that his worth is not in outward adornments, but in inner virtues: "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also." Plus it's shiny...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neligh

    Now, the Rainbow Fish had scales that were shiny. something something and act like a hiney. the plain fishes gave up asking him to play, something rude something, he swam away. Later a plain fish requested a scale "absolutely not," he sputtered, turning pale. "they're mine. they're me. they're attached to my body." Screamed the plain fish, "well I think they're gaudy!!" much later, lonely and wanting some fun he cried, "I know! I'll give away all but one! THAT will make up for me being a tool!" But before Now, the Rainbow Fish had scales that were shiny. something something and act like a hiney. the plain fishes gave up asking him to play, something rude something, he swam away. Later a plain fish requested a scale "absolutely not," he sputtered, turning pale. "they're mine. they're me. they're attached to my body." Screamed the plain fish, "well I think they're gaudy!!" much later, lonely and wanting some fun he cried, "I know! I'll give away all but one! THAT will make up for me being a tool!" But before he could act, Sylvester McMonkey McBean tootled through and said "I'll just take those if you please." Shoving them through his shiny scale shredder machine, he yelled over the noise, "This one's on the house. Now get over yourself! Make amends! Make some friends! Something continental shelf!" apologies to Dr Suess

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rossy

    So this special and unique fish has to give away his scales in order to have friends and be liked by the others? I don't think so -_- Ho about liking him for who he is? No, right? Unless he "shares" his scales with everyone, he will be an outcast! Yay! Ugh.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan M

    When I was about six, we had a book fair at school. You remember them - some company would take over your school library for the week and everyday you'd be asked to walk around and look at all the books you couldn't afford. At least, that's how I remember it. But this time, I became completely infatuated with one book in particular and could see no others. It was The Rainbow Fish. Everything about the book was magical to me and I begged and begged for the money to buy it. Finally, after days of When I was about six, we had a book fair at school. You remember them - some company would take over your school library for the week and everyday you'd be asked to walk around and look at all the books you couldn't afford. At least, that's how I remember it. But this time, I became completely infatuated with one book in particular and could see no others. It was The Rainbow Fish. Everything about the book was magical to me and I begged and begged for the money to buy it. Finally, after days of staring at it longingly, my grandfather agreed to take me to get it. We went early Friday morning, Papa convincing the secretary that we should be able to go down to the library early. I literally bounced the entire way down the hall, so excited to finally own The Rainbow Fish. We arrived at the library... and the book fair was gone. They had packed up that morning and left. I didn't get Rainbow Fish. Six-year-old!Megan was heartbroken in a way a cannot even describe. This is one of the most intense memories of my childhood. I did own eventually own Rainbow Fish - after checking it out from the library about 6 times. My Papa bought it for me for my birthday. But it has been a while since I actually reread it. My actual review of this book is pretty short: PERFECT. This book is PERFECT unless you're the kind of soul-sucking asshole who thinks that all forms of sharing are socialism. And don't overthink the story with your now grown mind and call it "disturbing". Because kids don't think like that. When I was small, I was absolutely enchanted with Rainbow Fish. To me, it wasn't about politics or the almost gory realization that Rainbow Fish is giving away pieces of his body. I just loved the story. And the sparkles, let's be real. "Give a glittering scale to each of the other fish. You will no longer be the most beautiful fish in the sea, but you will discover how to be happy."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I personally love this book, despite the fact that other people are so outraged by it. I find it kind of funny that people seem to be reaching for meanings, maybe as a means to back up their own personal feelings about things. Anyways.... The Rainbow Fish is very vain and thinks he's better than the other fish because he is so beautiful. He learns that being the most beautiful fish is not what is really important. I won't spoil it, but I think it's a great book and teaches valuable lessons.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I am all for teaching children to share and make friends, and I'm also all in favor of beautiful books about animals. So I sat down to read this book to my infant son. And was horrified. Here is the plot: Rainbow Fish is lovely. He has lots of sparkly silver scales. None of the other fish have these silver scales. Rainbow Fish does not play with the other fish. But one day, a little blue fish asks Rainbow Fish for one of his shiny scales. Rainbow Fish, understandably thrown, says "NO, those are pa I am all for teaching children to share and make friends, and I'm also all in favor of beautiful books about animals. So I sat down to read this book to my infant son. And was horrified. Here is the plot: Rainbow Fish is lovely. He has lots of sparkly silver scales. None of the other fish have these silver scales. Rainbow Fish does not play with the other fish. But one day, a little blue fish asks Rainbow Fish for one of his shiny scales. Rainbow Fish, understandably thrown, says "NO, those are part of my body, and you can't have one." The little blue fish is sad. He tells all the other fish that Rainbow Fish won't GIVE HIM HIS SCALES and all the other fish start shunning Rainbow Fish (it is unclear why they weren't disgruntled that Rainbow Fish never talked to them in the first place but are now all in a snit). I think "This is awful! Rainbow Fish didn't feel comfortable with Little Blue Fish's request and now he's suffering social castigation for it." Rainbow Fish asks an octopus how to be happy, and the octopus wisely tells him she can't give him the secret to happiness. The little blue fish comes back. And here I think "Oh, good! He's going to apologize for such an intrusive request, All Will Be Well, and we will all have learned an important lesson about boundaries." But NO! Little Blue Fish REPEATS his request and goes so far as to DIMINISH the importance of it: He wants "Just one little scale." Rainbow Fish, lonely, hurt, and confused, gives in, RIPS A SCALE OFF HIS BODY, and gives it to the little fish. The little fish likes him now! Now that Rainbow Fish has done something he was uncomfortable with, everyone thinks he's great! Clearly, this was a fantastic idea, so he starts ripping scales off with abandon, giving one to ALL the fish! And now EVERYONE likes him! The way to be popular was to completely disregard his own comfort level, boundaries, and sense of ownership and security in his own body! THAT'S the secret to happiness! He does keep one small silver scale for himself, but otherwise he leads a much happier life now that he has given in to peer pressure. That's not, by any stretch of the imagination, a good lesson for kids. I can see what the author was going for (sharing is good, generosity feels wonderful) but he chose a poor vehicle for that moral, and the result is a book I'm planning to drastically rewrite before sharing with my son again. The pictures, and the scales, are lovely, so there is that.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mississippi Library Commission

    Last week, the Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden visited our library! While she was here, she led a special storytime for students from the Mississippi School for the Deaf. The Rainbow Fish is one of her favorites and the book she chose to read to the kids. The kids loved this tale about a bright and fancy fish who learned a valuable lesson about making friends and sharing. They also loved receiving their own copies of the book to commemorate the occasion. This was pretty much the best stor Last week, the Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden visited our library! While she was here, she led a special storytime for students from the Mississippi School for the Deaf. The Rainbow Fish is one of her favorites and the book she chose to read to the kids. The kids loved this tale about a bright and fancy fish who learned a valuable lesson about making friends and sharing. They also loved receiving their own copies of the book to commemorate the occasion. This was pretty much the best storytime ever!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Dutton

    Rainbow fish is an award winning book written by Swiss author and illustrator, Marcus Pfister and translated into English by J.Alison James. The story is about a beautiful fish, with glimmering scales, on his journey to find friendship through the act of learning to share. Hesitant at first, this beautiful fish cannot imagine giving away some of his glimmering scales, however, with the advice of a wise octopus, he soon realises he is much happier when he shares his beauty with the other fish in Rainbow fish is an award winning book written by Swiss author and illustrator, Marcus Pfister and translated into English by J.Alison James. The story is about a beautiful fish, with glimmering scales, on his journey to find friendship through the act of learning to share. Hesitant at first, this beautiful fish cannot imagine giving away some of his glimmering scales, however, with the advice of a wise octopus, he soon realises he is much happier when he shares his beauty with the other fish in the sea. As well has having literacy value, the cross-curricular links of this book include Drama, Maths, Science, Art and Design and Social and Emotional aspects of Learning (SEAL)/PSHE. In Literacy children could be asked to discuss the use of adjectives in the story and suggest alternatives. They could use the model of the story and explore writing their own about other Rainbow animals and think about what might happen to them and they could think about how they might rewrite the story into a play-script which they could perform for their friends. In the EYFS it would also be a good idea to encourage the children to retell this story to their friends. Maths activities could include counting the scales of the fish and creating tessellations to look like fish scales. In science children could explore what they already know about fish and what they would like to find out as well as investigate shiny materials and their properties. Art and Design could focus on creating a 3D display/role play area as well as decorating fish using techniques of collage and also drawing underwater scenes using wax resist techniques. Finally this is a good resource to use for discussing sharing and friendship. In Circle time, children could discuss Rainbow Fish's behaviour at different points of the story and how it made the other fish feel. They could discuss what it means to be a good friend and how the fish felt when he was alone. The book offers a good opportunity to include hot seating to establish the feelings of each character in the story. It is definitely a good book to use in the EYFS to encourage children to share. With its beautiful pictures and wonderful moral, this book is of value in the classroom. I believe it could be used through the EYFS and Key Stage 1 depending on the chosen activities.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A lot of people rave over this one. Yes, it is true that the sparkly illustrations are eye-catching. However, the storyline is so common it has become rather trite. We get it okay? There's more to beauty than what's on the outside. Blah, blah, blah. Yet the irony is that the reason this book is so popular is precisely because of its beautiful illustrations.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I heard this book read aloud for the first time at a summer camp. A good friend then bought it for me as a birthday gift. It is a beautiful story about the joy that comes from giving of yourself to others.

  25. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Reread. Sweet, simplistic story about pride and how to overcome it through generosity. ><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>< One I remember enjoying with my daughters when they were little. Thanks for reminding me about it Skylar!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ghettohippie

    read it as often as possible to as many people as possible.....everybody gets a piece of beauty.....everyone is sharing.....everybody is friends....but the real reason i like the book so much is there is something shiny on every page.....yeah...the truthis finally out

  27. 4 out of 5

    Floor Flawless (Tussen De Boeken)

    Nog steeds mijn favoriete prentenboek ever!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Dawn

    I'm a little confused by all of the negative reviews. A vain and completely self-centred fish is under the impression his friends love him simply because he's beautiful. When he is openly rude to one of them, letting his much smaller and less fortunate 'friend' know that he is of an upper class and doesn't have to associate with him (never mind sharing with him) they refuse to talk to him to show him how rude he was. It's not until he shares his 'wealth' and forgets his own beauty and class that I'm a little confused by all of the negative reviews. A vain and completely self-centred fish is under the impression his friends love him simply because he's beautiful. When he is openly rude to one of them, letting his much smaller and less fortunate 'friend' know that he is of an upper class and doesn't have to associate with him (never mind sharing with him) they refuse to talk to him to show him how rude he was. It's not until he shares his 'wealth' and forgets his own beauty and class that he starts to enjoy himself. And this is bad? I'm not too sure about everyone else, but this book seems to remind me of another book about an old man who learns that wealth means nothing if you have no one to share it with AND the only way to make friends is to be kind. Maybe you've heard of it? The art of friendship comes from many things, including kindness and generosity. Teaching our children to share with those who don't have much isn't creating a communist society where there are no pretty rainbow fish. It's creating a society where we help that little fish who is less fortunate than us. Would you really scold your child because you spoil them with fifty presents at Christmas, but they wish to give ONE to a child isn't getting any? Perhaps the people making these reviews should look at the book more closely, instead of thinking every author is trying to brainwash your children with politics. Jeez. Until tonight I had forgotten about this book. I'm colouring an adult, ocean themed, colouring-in book and my fiancé made a reference to one of my fishes looking like The Rainbow Fish. Then it all came flooding back. I owned this book from a very, very young age (pre-kindergarten, which is when most of the childhood books originate from in my memory), and having it read over and over to me is a very fond memory I still have. Although not too much an achievement today, the shiny pressed foil scales on the fish, twenty years ago, blew my little mind. The watercolour paint style is very impressive and the story's morals made a big impression on me which I remember carrying through my childhood. Every intention I have is to one day read this to my children. It's a fantastic little story and I recommend it to everyone! Young and old, there is an enjoyment hidden in these pages, and a lesson our society dearly needs. Look at this video for one of the best narrations of a story I've ever heard.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jamila Kamal

    ‘The Rainbow fish’ is a beautifully illustrated book written by Marcus Pfister, and is most definitely one of my favourite childhood books! It tells a story of a unique fish, who is constantly praised for having many colours of the rainbow on her fins. One day the rainbow fish is asked to share her beautiful scales with the other fish. However to their bewilderment, the brightly coloured fish refuses to share. The rainbow fish eventually seeks solace from the wise octopus who advises that it is ‘The Rainbow fish’ is a beautifully illustrated book written by Marcus Pfister, and is most definitely one of my favourite childhood books! It tells a story of a unique fish, who is constantly praised for having many colours of the rainbow on her fins. One day the rainbow fish is asked to share her beautiful scales with the other fish. However to their bewilderment, the brightly coloured fish refuses to share. The rainbow fish eventually seeks solace from the wise octopus who advises that it is nice to share with the other fish. In the end, the rainbow fish learned that kindness is very important, and that sharing her beautiful shiny scales helped build new friendships. The character of the rainbow fish is easy for children of all age ranges to identify with. The story is successful in highlighting that at times, sharing for young children proves to be a challenge, as some children may still be caught in phase of being egocentric. Nevertheless, the story outlines a moral undertone, which is that unless we share we can sometimes lose out on making friends. Therefore the message is to be kind and share in order to receive and benefit from your kindness. This book attracts readers of a wide age range as it delivers a simplistic message which can be applied to many children. This book is ideal for children in early years who would absolutely love it as it is so colourful. The Rainbow fish could also be read to children in KS1, to help develop retrieval skills. During circle time, children could reflect on special things that they possess, and how this could be shared with others. Also the book could be used as a tool to consider issues relating to friendship and sharing, and its importance and impact on others. The book could also be used for children in KS2 by developing their role-play and performance skills, getting across the message that sharing is caring. There are so many ways that this book could be themed in, and is definitely a recommended read!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Orla Byrne

    This is a beautifully illustrated book by Marcus Pfister. However, I'm in two minds about the story. On the one hand, like other reviewers, I feel that the key message is a bit odd. It tells the story of a fish who has lovely glittery scales but has no friends as the other fish are so jealous of his beauty. In order for the other fish to like him, he must give away all of his lovely scales. Only when they have gained a share of his scales will the other fish make friends with him. Although it do This is a beautifully illustrated book by Marcus Pfister. However, I'm in two minds about the story. On the one hand, like other reviewers, I feel that the key message is a bit odd. It tells the story of a fish who has lovely glittery scales but has no friends as the other fish are so jealous of his beauty. In order for the other fish to like him, he must give away all of his lovely scales. Only when they have gained a share of his scales will the other fish make friends with him. Although it does encourage sharing, I feel that it encourages sharing for the wrong reasons; the fish has to sacrifice his identity and uniqueness or else the other fish will be mean to him. However, having read the story to a reception class I acknowledge that it can spark some good discussion and reflection around the area of sharing and friendship and it can also be used to demonstrate that beauty is not important.

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