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All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 1

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In 1940, DC Comics had a radical idea: what if a group of super-heroes banded together to fight threats too great for any one of them to handle alone? Thus was born the Justice Society of America, featuring Green Lantern, Hawkman, Wonder Woman, and many others. These colorful tales set a standard for superhero teams that's still followed today.


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In 1940, DC Comics had a radical idea: what if a group of super-heroes banded together to fight threats too great for any one of them to handle alone? Thus was born the Justice Society of America, featuring Green Lantern, Hawkman, Wonder Woman, and many others. These colorful tales set a standard for superhero teams that's still followed today.

30 review for All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    guanaeps

    The first four issues involving the Justice Society of America under the All Star Comics name, which contains the seminal first Super-hero team team-up in issue #3. These are comics from the 40s, so I didn't expect to be dazzled necessarily, but I found some enjoyment—you can see how young the medium is in these books, with these heroes, most of them super-natural, simply taking down crime rackets. It was nice being introduced to characters I only knew in passing; Dr. Fate, Spectre and Sandman w The first four issues involving the Justice Society of America under the All Star Comics name, which contains the seminal first Super-hero team team-up in issue #3. These are comics from the 40s, so I didn't expect to be dazzled necessarily, but I found some enjoyment—you can see how young the medium is in these books, with these heroes, most of them super-natural, simply taking down crime rackets. It was nice being introduced to characters I only knew in passing; Dr. Fate, Spectre and Sandman were some stand outs, although old-school Flash is undeniably awesome. Worth the trip.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The other John

    I haven't gotten hooked back on my comic book habit (yet) but I have pulled a few off the shelf to enjoy over meals. (Comics are great to read when your hands are primarily occupied with the task of stuffing your face.) This is the first volume reprinting the Justice Society of America stories from All-Star Comics, issues three through six. According to modern standards, the art and stories are pretty crude, yet I have to admit I enjoyed them. Comics of the 1940s give a glimpse of an alien world I haven't gotten hooked back on my comic book habit (yet) but I have pulled a few off the shelf to enjoy over meals. (Comics are great to read when your hands are primarily occupied with the task of stuffing your face.) This is the first volume reprinting the Justice Society of America stories from All-Star Comics, issues three through six. According to modern standards, the art and stories are pretty crude, yet I have to admit I enjoyed them. Comics of the 1940s give a glimpse of an alien world--a world filled with gangsters, hidden civilizations, mad scientists and heroes who are unambiguously good and heroic. A fine place to escape for a half hour or so.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This first volume of All-Star Archives features the first meeting of the Justice Society of America. In the first story, the members sit around talking about recent adventures they had, then in the other stories, they do meet to face a threat, then break off into solo stories to solve it. Each chapter is written and drawn by the hero's regular creative team. Since DC never got around to archives featuring Hourman or the Atom, it's great to see what their original adventures must have been like. Mo This first volume of All-Star Archives features the first meeting of the Justice Society of America. In the first story, the members sit around talking about recent adventures they had, then in the other stories, they do meet to face a threat, then break off into solo stories to solve it. Each chapter is written and drawn by the hero's regular creative team. Since DC never got around to archives featuring Hourman or the Atom, it's great to see what their original adventures must have been like. More fun than I expected.

  4. 4 out of 5

    C. John Kerry

    This volume reprints issues #3-6 of All Star Comics published back in the 1940s. These are the first four adventures of the legendary Justice Society of America. For the record the first two issues were anthology titles without any of the stories being linked to each other. The first story in this volume indicates that possibly the material for All Star's third issue was being assemble before the idea of the JSA was thought of. The story is comprised of individual segments which do not really re This volume reprints issues #3-6 of All Star Comics published back in the 1940s. These are the first four adventures of the legendary Justice Society of America. For the record the first two issues were anthology titles without any of the stories being linked to each other. The first story in this volume indicates that possibly the material for All Star's third issue was being assemble before the idea of the JSA was thought of. The story is comprised of individual segments which do not really relate to each other, framed by a dinner meeting of the JSA where partycrasher Johnny Thunder has suggested each member relate one of their most recent cases. From issue four on things would be different. After a brief opening sequence the individual members would head off to tackle their part of the larger case. At the end of the story the members would gather to tie up loose ends and/or catch the overall criminal mastermind. The original membership of the JSA was The Flash; Hawkman; Green Lantern; The Atom; The Sandman; The Hourman; Doctor Fate and The Spectre; By the end of the last story one of those members will have departed to be replaced by a new member. This was due to the bylaws of the JSA of the time which stated that 1. There could be no more than eight members 2. A member must appear in one of the following: Adventure Comics; All-American Comics; Flash Comics or More Fun Comics 3. They could not have their own book The third one is the reason usually give why neither Batman or Superman were active members (though they were Honorary Members). but number two would have kept them out as well. I would recommend this book without hesitation. For anyone interested in the Golden Age of Comics or comic history in general this is an essential volume. It is out of print but is worth the effort to find (and the ending of the third story is actually quite funny and makes the book worth reading).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    This collection reprints issues 3 through 6 of All-Star Comics, which was the original home of the Justice Society. Starting as a quarterly publication, it quickly increased to bi-monthly, and these issues were originally published in 1940 and early 1941. So these issues were all published before Pearl Harbor, but the war had started and Nazi sabotage was a popular theme in stories of the time. Something not known by many, is that the original members of the Justice Society were not all character This collection reprints issues 3 through 6 of All-Star Comics, which was the original home of the Justice Society. Starting as a quarterly publication, it quickly increased to bi-monthly, and these issues were originally published in 1940 and early 1941. So these issues were all published before Pearl Harbor, but the war had started and Nazi sabotage was a popular theme in stories of the time. Something not known by many, is that the original members of the Justice Society were not all characters from National Periodicals (DC Comics). It was published by National but also featured characters from All-American Publications. The Justice Society has its first meeting in this volume, becoming the first superhero team. Comics were quite different back in those days, these volumes being 64 pages each, and all written by Gardner Fox. However, even though they are a superhero team, the Justice Society don't really act together - each issue consists of shorter stories where one or two of the heroes will have adventures and then they will head back to the clubhouse. Also, there are no supervillains - all the antagonists in these stories are either Nazi saboteurs or mobsters. Overall, an interesting look at the early days of superhero comics.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Davie

    Old school at the beginning gr8 original storie

  7. 4 out of 5

    William

    I love this book because its when secondary heroes become the main characters and they are welcomed into the Justice Society. I recommend this to anyone who likes DC superheroes and likes. It reminds me of a meeting that my dad and mom goes to a lot of times. I don't like it when it has transitions because its old and it has newspaper articles that some person inspired hem to write or something.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects All Star Comics #3-6 the first appearances of the Justice Society of America in 1941. Issue 3 is the official first appearance of the Justice Society but all the group actually does is meet and tell stories of their adventures making it an anthology story. Still, I appreciated how special it must have been for kids in 1941 to see the heroes all on the same place, and the interactions are fun. Issue 4 sees the Justice Society getting to work on special assignment from the FBI roo This book collects All Star Comics #3-6 the first appearances of the Justice Society of America in 1941. Issue 3 is the official first appearance of the Justice Society but all the group actually does is meet and tell stories of their adventures making it an anthology story. Still, I appreciated how special it must have been for kids in 1941 to see the heroes all on the same place, and the interactions are fun. Issue 4 sees the Justice Society getting to work on special assignment from the FBI rooting out fifth columnist activity. Some of this activity is sophistic, some isn't-such as when the Golden Age Atom who asks people, "You don't lime America do you? Wouldn't you like a dictatorship better?" This issue follows the formula of almost all future issues as the JSA meet at the beginning, split up and individual take on the bad guys and then come back together at the end. In this case, they're led back towards that city of Nazi power-Toledo, Ohio. Issue 5 is almost the reverse of a typical JSA story as a master criminal plans to take out the JSA and teams up crooks to go after them. The way this story plays out is a lot of fun with a great running gag. After getting his own comic book, All-Flash Quarterly, the Flash was chosen as an honorary member and Johnny Thunder is to replace him on the active list. The JSA gives him an initiation of tracking down a criminal and they show him a series of headlines detailing the criminal's heinous crimes. After Johnny leaves, the JSA reveals the criminal is actually nut who prints these newspapers himself. However, despite this, Johnny Thunder manages to get into so much trouble that every single member of the Justice Society has to come to rescue him once. While I'm not a huge fan of Johnny Thunder in the JSA, this book on his initiation was just hilarious. Overall, these are some of the most fun golden age comics I've read. The JSA is executed in a way that's fun and lighthearted, but with some decent adventures and with great variety. The solo adventures in the book which are part of every story include true Superpowered heroes (Flash, Green Lantern, and Hour Man), nonpowered Heroes (The Atom and the Sandman), and also supernatural heroes (The Spectre and Doctor Fate.) Overall, this book is a highly recommended read for any superhero fan.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Justin Deveau

    All-Star Comics #3-6 The introduction of the Justice Society of America. Often touted as the first super hero team however in their early issues there was not much teaming up going on. Each issue has an opening scene introducing the problem the team must face but then we have the team members splitting up, each to handle things on their own in an adventure drawn by their individual artist in their individual style.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cyn Mcdonald

    All Star Comics #3-6. Each issue contains loosely linked stories featuring The Flash, Hawkman, The Spectre, Johnny Thunder, The Sandman, Dr. Fate, The Atom, and Green Lantern. None are terribly exciting -- rather unbelievable plots and lots of fisticuffs.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    All-Star Comics #3-6 1940-41 In color, HB, OOP JSA Golden Age

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Schmitt

    I love the original super-hero team of the Justice Society of America!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Jones-Goldstein

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jaye Brooks Sr.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josh Gravert

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rex

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

  20. 5 out of 5

    John Desmarais

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Findley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robert Stubbs

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter Cooper

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anders

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Webster

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  30. 5 out of 5

    Simon

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