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I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff

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From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a hilarious and poignant collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she g From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a hilarious and poignant collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she going with friends? Wouldn't it be incredibly lonely? The North route is better! Was it safe for a woman? The Southern route is the way to go! You should bring mace! And a common one... why? But Abbi had always found comfort in solitude, and needed space to step back and hit the reset button. As she spent time in each city and town on her way to Los Angeles, she mulled over the big questions-- What do I really want? What is the worst possible scenario in which I could run into my ex? How has the decision to wear my shirts tucked in been pivotal in my adulthood? In this collection of anecdotes, observations and reflections--all told in the sharp, wildly funny, and relatable voice that has endeared Abbi to critics and fans alike--readers will feel like they're in the passenger seat on a fun and, ultimately, inspiring journey. With some original illustrations by the author.


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From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a hilarious and poignant collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she g From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a hilarious and poignant collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she going with friends? Wouldn't it be incredibly lonely? The North route is better! Was it safe for a woman? The Southern route is the way to go! You should bring mace! And a common one... why? But Abbi had always found comfort in solitude, and needed space to step back and hit the reset button. As she spent time in each city and town on her way to Los Angeles, she mulled over the big questions-- What do I really want? What is the worst possible scenario in which I could run into my ex? How has the decision to wear my shirts tucked in been pivotal in my adulthood? In this collection of anecdotes, observations and reflections--all told in the sharp, wildly funny, and relatable voice that has endeared Abbi to critics and fans alike--readers will feel like they're in the passenger seat on a fun and, ultimately, inspiring journey. With some original illustrations by the author.

30 review for I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nat

    Rant Review From An Avid Broad City Viewer: I Might Regret This by Abbi Jacobson I was over the moon excited when I found this was out in the world and also (low-key) mad that I wasn't informed earlier of this release. Broad City was one of my highlights of September 2017, when I first discovered and watched the series with the release of season four, and featured my commentary and all the details on the show in my wrap up of the month. In hindsight, I guess some things are better left unread, l Rant Review From An Avid Broad City Viewer: I Might Regret This by Abbi Jacobson I was over the moon excited when I found this was out in the world and also (low-key) mad that I wasn't informed earlier of this release. Broad City was one of my highlights of September 2017, when I first discovered and watched the series with the release of season four, and featured my commentary and all the details on the show in my wrap up of the month. In hindsight, I guess some things are better left unread, like angry emails or rant-y reads. Going into this having left two disappointing books prior, I was hoping for a pick-me-up in the form of Abbi Jacobson's writing voice. I checked out the audiobook - read by the author - and it was a joy to discover her words read with such intending and meaning; Abbi Jacobson doesn’t just read her words, she lives through them. While reading, I also realized that this was my first foray into the author's solo work without Ilana being there to balance out her more every-day-awkwardness. It got me wondering which part of the Broad City duo I essentially enjoy more when they're apart. After reading nearly three chapters, it dawned on me pretty quickly... Source As much as I enjoy a good tangent, I'd like to, at some point in the storyline, reach the bigger picture, you know, the one mentioned in the title and then never elaborated on till the very rapid end... This is usually where Ilana comes in to balance out Abbi's long-winded talks with humor to light up the scene, so I found that aspect to be repeatedly missing in the essays. It's just that I'd rather not be taken through pages of discussion on her junk mail disposing routine and what that fully entails with the many different categories they're divided in. By the time she gets to the point, on finding a long-lost letter, I've already forgotten what the essay title was about. And this effect only snowballed the more she went on. It's at this point that I was extremely thankful for the 2X speed on audio. It got me wondering whether a certain word count was trying to be met?? Because Abbi Jacobson had so many worthy components to elaborate on (like discussing the actual seventy-year-old letter that reached her, her road trip which starts off the book but isn't mentioned for at least three chapters, the actual relationship she first experienced) but she either skims over the highlights in a quick paragraph or wraps it up in a speedy end, opting to discuss detailed throwaway things . And it made me feel slowly more riled up the more I found random tangents thrown my way. I'm perplexed as to why the audiobook is over six hours when that time could've been cut in half with all these rants on what-ifs and building up any possible scenario (that'll never happen) before and after the event... but then the event itself is barely discussed in detail. Like the chase to hunt down the owners of the seventy-year-old letter, which she spent romanticizing in plenty of paragraphs wondering what if, when in reality it was wrapped up in one page. Nonfiction essays are supposed to be a fun, easy-breezy read for me, like I recently experienced while listening to Anne Bogel's “I'd Rather Be Reading,” which cuts short at just over two hours. I wanted to be left wanting something more, which is what Broad City excels at with its 20-minute episodes. But this book just left me wanting something else. I jumped on any opportunity to be distracted in a google search by her mentions in the book, such as her friend's chase after the rightful owner behind the developed film found in a blizzard. I can appreciate a long tangent and vibe if it’s on a topic the writer personally cares about and I get to experience the excitement through her words, but Jacobson chose to elaborate on details that are usually cut in the second draft. There's a lot of pages filled with dreaming and fantasizing, but little to no actual time spent on the action of the event. She even acknowledges the same: “I’m going to go farther away from the B&B for a moment, because tangents are the most effective way I have to stall going to what I feel might be an extremely uncomfortable breakfast full of me halfheartedly making small talk over mediocre pastries. ” She goes again into an ‘I wonder what will happen…’ spiral when staying for the first time at a B&B on her road trip, instead of just skipping straight ahead to what actually went down. This occurs way too many times in her writing to make the book enjoyable to read for me. The fact is that she build-up so many possibilities in her head of what might happen so that it creates this effect of disappointment when the real-life event finally comes around to being discussed and pales in comparison. I mean, this is when you know the rants are bad: “While we’re here, I also want to touch on the whole saucer issue—” Plus: a whole chapter dedicated to all the items in her car for the 10-hour drive ahead. This is also where the frustrations hits rock bottom because there are so many moments when it’s acceptable to go in depth with something juicy, like Kelly Rippa holding an article about that same long-lost letter Abbi found from seventy years ago in her mail, which happens way before Broad City, and way before Kelly Rippa even appeared on the show. Like, was that ever mentioned in real life? Did Kelly remember delivering the story? So many details worth to elaborate on but are barely mentioned again. Even something as trivial as her friend’s last name being Bieber. Like, sure, go on a tangent about your junk mail and skip over this… Don’t mind me. There comes a point when you spend so much time wrapped up in fiction and fantasy that you tend to forget how simple and great real life can feel, how intimate and true. And I feel like this book lacked the intimate truths I was waiting to connect with, like those feelings evoked after watching a good episode of Broad City. So it's regrettable the good didn't come to outshine the bad because when Abbi Jacobson focuses on the subject in front of her she shines so brightly in her humor. She nails down so many specifics that had me nodding along. Like her do's and don'ts when it comes to her three-week road-trip. In the end, I just wish the author would've spent more time talking about herself, rather than wasting so many pages on unimportant details and scenarios that never came to happen. “Do not listen to Sia’s “Breathe Me.” If you must, do not be driving, especially not in a beautiful landscape. If you are, and it plays, do not by any means put your window down and picture your car driving through the expansive terrain from an aerial drone shot.”  Her insights are on-point: “SIDENOTE, “will-they-won’t-theys” are always will-theys, right?!” If you enjoy long-winded, off-the-page, stream-of-consciousness writing then  I Might Regret This  by Abbi Jacobson might be your kind of book. Make your bookish purchase through my Amazon Affiliate: I Might Regret This  by Abbi Jacobson. I’ll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils This review and more can be found on my blog.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Janday

    I want to give this book to all of my friends. I want to encourage us to write the shit out because we all need therapists and none of us can afford them. In a world where everything is so damn performative, Abby's voice isn't clear, nor is it fresh: it's one of a rambling, borderline obsessive overthinker. That selfsame voice screaming at us about that one time we mispronounced a word in front of our crush in eighth grade when we're now 35 and it's 3:32am and wehaveameetinginfivehoursforthelove I want to give this book to all of my friends. I want to encourage us to write the shit out because we all need therapists and none of us can afford them. In a world where everything is so damn performative, Abby's voice isn't clear, nor is it fresh: it's one of a rambling, borderline obsessive overthinker. That selfsame voice screaming at us about that one time we mispronounced a word in front of our crush in eighth grade when we're now 35 and it's 3:32am and wehaveameetinginfivehoursfortheloveofallthatisholy! The Anxiety in Me recognizes the Anxiety in You, Abbi. And I hope more of us can open up and be more honest with ourselves. I read an advance digital manuscript of this book that I obtained as an employee of Hachette Book Group.

  3. 5 out of 5

    BiblioBrandie

    I sent the publisher a fangirl email (always with the "I'm a librarian" mention) and begged for an advanced copy of this book. To my surprise, it worked! I quickly read through this collection of essays by one of my favorite funny ladies and her writing does not disappoint. Which really was not a surprise. There is so much to love within these pages...she's hilarious (I couldn't help but hear her voice as I was reading), there are some very touching moments (the long love letters to Ilana and he I sent the publisher a fangirl email (always with the "I'm a librarian" mention) and begged for an advanced copy of this book. To my surprise, it worked! I quickly read through this collection of essays by one of my favorite funny ladies and her writing does not disappoint. Which really was not a surprise. There is so much to love within these pages...she's hilarious (I couldn't help but hear her voice as I was reading), there are some very touching moments (the long love letters to Ilana and her mom are two of my favorite chapters), she includes some of her drawings, and there are some revealing moments (won't spoil!). It's exactly what I always hope for in a collection of personal essays. Sad it's over but my daughter was basically reading over my shoulder so she's happy I can pass it on to her now.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Hager

    Confession time: I haven't watched Broad City (although it's been on my radar and I do want to watch; I'll probably binge pretty soon) and I accepted a pitch for this because Cheryl Strayed blurbed the cover. (And because I tend to love memoirs by funny women, regardless of my familiarity with their work.) I said that to say this: I am now a huge fan of Abbi Jacobson. This book is as funny as you'd expect (maybe even funnier; suffice to say it's a fantastic read) but she's also incredibly honest. Confession time: I haven't watched Broad City (although it's been on my radar and I do want to watch; I'll probably binge pretty soon) and I accepted a pitch for this because Cheryl Strayed blurbed the cover. (And because I tend to love memoirs by funny women, regardless of my familiarity with their work.) I said that to say this: I am now a huge fan of Abbi Jacobson. This book is as funny as you'd expect (maybe even funnier; suffice to say it's a fantastic read) but she's also incredibly honest. I'm not sure I've ever related to a stranger as much as I've related to her in this. (Her sleep study chapters, you guys. I feel like if you've ever had any problems sleeping, you'll know where this is coming from.) I expected to enjoy this book and I expected it to make me even more excited to watch Broad City. I didn't expect to completely love it and read it in a day. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy Polyreader

    Exactly the revitalizing read I needed! Humorous, engaging and self-reflective. I was lucky enough to be sent a copy from the publisher pre-release date, and I just devoured this in a few short sittings. Full review to come on the blog!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rich

    A total delight! Equal parts poignant and funny, Abbi has a really cool perspective.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Silcox

    I really enjoyed this book. It felt like a conversation with a good friend that can be silly, vulnerable and profound all at the same time. I appreciated Abbi’s openness throughout the whole book and I was sad to finish it because I wanted more. I hope she continues to write more books!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Smith

    A lovely, well-paced read. Such a special experience hearing some of Abbi’s vulnerabilities. Incredibly relatable, funny, and kind.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tessy Consentino

    Abbi is me and I am Abbi.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Get the audio book. You won't regret it. Abbi tells her stories and short rants effortlessly. I felt that she was so relatable while discussing her inner conflicts and going through heartbreak. Going on a cross country road trip solo is bad ass in its own but I like that she took the time to do it her way, without taking everyone's advice on must do's (something I'd like to try on my next trip). I really enjoyed the parts where she spoke about her step dad, mom, and Ilana. Now to figure out how Get the audio book. You won't regret it. Abbi tells her stories and short rants effortlessly. I felt that she was so relatable while discussing her inner conflicts and going through heartbreak. Going on a cross country road trip solo is bad ass in its own but I like that she took the time to do it her way, without taking everyone's advice on must do's (something I'd like to try on my next trip). I really enjoyed the parts where she spoke about her step dad, mom, and Ilana. Now to figure out how to look at the photos and drawings from the audio book...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Adams

    Listening to Abbi's voice really pushed this into the 5-star arena. As a voice actress on top of her comedic presence, she is able to capture a lovely balance between vulnerability and humor.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Being British and not watching a huge amount of TV meant that I had not had the opportunity to come across comedy writer and hilarious on-screen presence Abbi Jacobson up until this point. I am somehow always drawn to memoirs, personal accounts and musings on life so I was excited to get acquainted with Abbi and her work through I Might Regret This. Abbi takes us on her journey of recovery and reflection; going on a solitary road trip that aims to re-balance her views on life after an unexpected Being British and not watching a huge amount of TV meant that I had not had the opportunity to come across comedy writer and hilarious on-screen presence Abbi Jacobson up until this point. I am somehow always drawn to memoirs, personal accounts and musings on life so I was excited to get acquainted with Abbi and her work through I Might Regret This. Abbi takes us on her journey of recovery and reflection; going on a solitary road trip that aims to re-balance her views on life after an unexpected (in many ways) break-up. I Might Regret This contains raw emotions coated with Abbi’s courageous honesty, charming unfiltered consciousness and wacky sense of humour. (Abbi is the queen of the tangent and the hypothetical). I laughed so much whilst simultaneously reflecting on my own life and all those moments that have led me to the person I am today. Her words are a poignant reminder of the importance of facing your failures head on and putting them to good use, fuelling our future efforts. This book is every bit as nuanced as Abbi is. I was in stitches whilst reading a list of adult concerns. I sat and contemplated the cup and saucer debate. I had my head in my hands when I was reading her many accounts of being up till 2am still internally raging that she can’t nod off because we have all been there. Abbi’s abrupt (you’re right, it is never good) loss of love fuelled this trip which in turn paved the way for this book and Abbi has used this opportunity to connect with us all on a multitude of levels. The sheer variety of formats that AJ uses to share her story and observe the world is enough to get lost within these pages. Essays, notes to self, bullet points, lists, diaries, studies, interpretations, personal illustrations (very talented) and the purest streams of uncut observation you will ever see put to paper. Abbi talks about love, the unexpected, creativity, fear, work, regret, failure, culture, sexism, pride, spirituality and moving on from heart-break. Nothing is beyond consideration in AJ’s world and I felt connected to her in that respect. Abbi is an immensely relatable human being and it was a fascinating experience to be the passenger on her trip. Going from New York to North Carolina, to Texas, New Mexico and all the way to Arizona, Abbi goes on a very alternative path that allows her to acknowledge where she has been, where she is right now and the future before her. If you are a fan of Broad City (I wasn’t… Am now) then there are plenty of insights it her work with Ilana. Sometimes you just need to see the world from a different set of eyes and I enjoyed my time with Abbi Jacobson, reminding me that failure is an option and its what you next time that matters. There are so many cool, hilarious, inspiring and odd moments to be had here for any reader. I think the illustrations were an important addition because the act as snippets of Abbi mindsets throughout her trip. Abbi anxious reflection turns into heart-warming recollection and I Might Regret This becomes required reading for readers who feel lost, disconnected, frustrated or confused. I came away from this book feeling relieved and connected. It is pretty much a must read for everyone and it comes highly recommended from me. Abbi Jacobson is asking the big questions in life right now and though she is getting few answers, I applaud her efforts in delivering her wisdom and trying her best to level our modern playing field.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book! It's hard to know what to expect from "celebrity" or "actor" memoirs. However, this is more of a travelogue than a memoir - there's lots of exposed inner monologue, there are drawings and lists interspersed throughout the prose, and the narrative structure relies on places more so than chronological time. If you know Abbi from BROAD CITY, you will have an easy time picking up the humor and tone of the book. While she does delve into her career - f I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book! It's hard to know what to expect from "celebrity" or "actor" memoirs. However, this is more of a travelogue than a memoir - there's lots of exposed inner monologue, there are drawings and lists interspersed throughout the prose, and the narrative structure relies on places more so than chronological time. If you know Abbi from BROAD CITY, you will have an easy time picking up the humor and tone of the book. While she does delve into her career - from her discovery of comedy to meeting Ilana to pitching their show to networks to writing and reflecting on moments where real-life diverges from show character - Abbi is more interested in sharing her emotional and intellectual progression. I found the entire book incredibly relatable. Then again, I love Abbi's comedy and work on BROAD CITY. It wasn't a hard sell for me. And yet, what I loved most was the narrative voice. It is very personal, like a good friend telling you a story or gushing about their favorite place to get bagels. I could hear Abbi's voice in my head... though to be fair, I did start reading this immediately after seeing in conversation with Seattle author extraordinaire Lindy West. Her voice had already bounced around in my brain and it was easily picked up off the page. Any one who has experienced and lost love, driven cross-country, grappled with their identity, been at a crossroads in their career, or is generally in their mid-20s to mid-30s will discover moments in I MIGHT REGRET THIS that drive home. Abbi is thoughtful, witty, and specific in her vulnerabilities. She writes with a distinct point of view and bluntness that I found endearing. This is a fun, moderately light read that I blew through in three sittings.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Lagerfeld

    Have you ever experienced a break up? Do you know what heartache feels like? Have you ever had an experience that made you want to run away from your life even for a short amount of time so you don’t have to face the crippling emotions that are chasing you? Do you love Broad City? If you answered yes to one or all of these questions then you will love this book. Abbi Jacobson experienced her first real soul destroying, all encompassing, heart shattering, and life altering break up just before the Have you ever experienced a break up? Do you know what heartache feels like? Have you ever had an experience that made you want to run away from your life even for a short amount of time so you don’t have to face the crippling emotions that are chasing you? Do you love Broad City? If you answered yes to one or all of these questions then you will love this book. Abbi Jacobson experienced her first real soul destroying, all encompassing, heart shattering, and life altering break up just before the completion of a season of Broad City. The kind of break up that makes you physically ache; where every place you go you are simultaneously terrified and hopeful that your ex may round the next corner. This was this kind of break up where you almost feel haunted by your lost love and what could have been. Abbi had a short window of time between the wrapping of the season in New York and her next job in Los Angeles so she took the opportunity to get in her car and drive cross country. The book follows Abbi’s journey from New York to LA. Each chapter focuses on one of the cities she visits, her reflections on how she got there and memories that brought her to this place. Along the way you learn about the meeting of the dream team (Abbi and Ilana), how Broad City was created and its road to television. But more importantly than anything you learn about Abbi. While the basis of the story and the reason behind the road trip is a breakup she does not dwell too much on her sorrow; and she never comes off as someone who wants you to feel sorry for her. It is just a relatable girl, telling a relatable story in her truly unique voice. She is funny at times, (which is to be expected if you watch Broad City), but she is more importantly vulnerable, honest and sincere. Not only will you get insight into who Abbi is, you will also get to see some of her art; get podcast and music recommendations; plus I think every adult in the world will on some level relate to the sleep studies that a peppered throughout the book. I have read many a celeb memoir/biography/collection of personal essays and I have to say this is my top five. Funny, smart, poignant, refreshing and relatable. A must read that by the end of the book you feel like you have made a new friend.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    A very enjoyable, relatable, emotional, and funny mini-memoir from one of my favorite comedians and artists working today, Abbi Jacobson of Broad City. Stands out from the pack of obligatory "essay collections" from the likes of Tina Fey, Mindy Kaling, etc., who, to me, showed in their books that being funny and likable doesn't necessarily translate to having something interesting to say on the page. Abbi's perspective in "I Might Regret This" is that of your best friend whose success you admire A very enjoyable, relatable, emotional, and funny mini-memoir from one of my favorite comedians and artists working today, Abbi Jacobson of Broad City. Stands out from the pack of obligatory "essay collections" from the likes of Tina Fey, Mindy Kaling, etc., who, to me, showed in their books that being funny and likable doesn't necessarily translate to having something interesting to say on the page. Abbi's perspective in "I Might Regret This" is that of your best friend whose success you admire, confessing that she too doesn't quite have it all together, but affirming that we're all going to be okay. She should start a blog or something. (Seems counterintuitive to do so AFTER writing a book, but I want to continue following her journey, and her literary voice is just about as entertaining as Broad City!)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katie Pelton

    Read this in 24 hours, which is a personal record for this slow reader! Although it’s a bit Eat, Pray, Love of a privileged female getting time and freedom to face heartache, I couldn’t put it down and found it wildly relatable. Plus there are references to Gilmore Girls and My Best Friend’s Wedding. I laughed out loud often and appreciated the slightly neurotic thoughts of an anxious mind.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Manske

    I am giving this book 5 stars not because I think it is a perfect book but because within its pages I found exactly what I was looking for - humor, meditations on anxiety (so relatable!!), stories about my favorite show Broad City, and drawings. Lots of drawings. This is a special book that convinces me even further that Abbi Jacobson and I could be friends in real life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Hart

    Abbi Jacobson is a funny writer, which I anticipated. She’s also an incredibly vulnerable writer, cracking her heart open to write about a period of transition in her life and capture how it feels to be a young woman at a turning point in life. I thought this book was hilarious and comforting. It made me feel seen.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Louie

    This was a great book. It was super funny and insightful. I didn't know she read the audiobook version herself, but I read the entire book in her voice anyway so it was almost as good. Pretty much everything I knew about Abbi Jacobson before I read this was from watching Broad City. She is hilarious, and the show is awesome as well, so I definitely enjoyed reading about the background of how the show was developed and how she met Ilana. 4.75/5 stars - would definitely recommend! (Would recommend This was a great book. It was super funny and insightful. I didn't know she read the audiobook version herself, but I read the entire book in her voice anyway so it was almost as good. Pretty much everything I knew about Abbi Jacobson before I read this was from watching Broad City. She is hilarious, and the show is awesome as well, so I definitely enjoyed reading about the background of how the show was developed and how she met Ilana. 4.75/5 stars - would definitely recommend! (Would recommend Broad City also!)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Crupi

    Abbi needs Ilana. This was not great.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    “Everyone is on their own timeline when it comes to love, so it’s okay.”

  22. 5 out of 5

    Abbey

    10/10 recommend getting the audiobook for this because abbi <3

  23. 4 out of 5

    shirley

    I just...really loved this. Tender and funny and smart.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jude Germann

    I could rave about this one. So, so good and so relatable. Abbi touched on insecurities that women & all people have that are inevitably placed on us by society about fear of being alone, or lacking a significant other, & being okay with it. There were raw moments that comforted me and made me think "whew, I thought I was the only one that did that. Good to know".

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Newman

    I really loved this book. I felt like I was reading straight out of her journal or listening to my best friends rant about their lives over dinner. At times, I felt like I was with her on the road trip. Her story, worries, desires, and aspirations are very relatable. All of the questions she was asking herself or the stories she would come up with in her head are things I've done many times. I don't think everyone would enjoy this book - it is messy, informal, and a little all over the place. Th I really loved this book. I felt like I was reading straight out of her journal or listening to my best friends rant about their lives over dinner. At times, I felt like I was with her on the road trip. Her story, worries, desires, and aspirations are very relatable. All of the questions she was asking herself or the stories she would come up with in her head are things I've done many times. I don't think everyone would enjoy this book - it is messy, informal, and a little all over the place. There were even points during my reading where I just wanted to yell at her - give it up already! Overall, loved it. I would suggest it to any of my girlfriends.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alyson

    I loved this with every bit of my janky heart. This book found me at the right time, and I am grateful for it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kendall

    Sad, beautiful, smart, open and honest. That should be enough for you to want to read it. I never knew how much Abbi and I were alike and I want to thank her for sharing her stories with me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allison Morway

    I’ve read a few celeb essay collections/ memoirs, and most of the time I get the impression that they are pretending to try to sound relatable, but really just low key bragging. This one ACTUALLY felt vulnerable.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carly Budzynski

    I’ve never watched Broad City. Don’t judge please. But this book was beautiful. I needed this book when I was 22 and a bit broken like Abbi. But she took a road trip and I moved to Kentucky. Abbi is hilarious, yet poignant. I was very impressed with this book. I listened to the audio, and she’s an excellent narrator. 5 stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Exactly what I needed. One part memoir, one part observations on the world. I relate to Abbi so much, and I'm so glad she got a little more personal in this book. Can't wait to read more from her!

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