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I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff

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New York Times Bestseller From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a "poignant, funny, and beautifully unabashed" (Cheryl Strayed) bestselling essay collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across t New York Times Bestseller From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a "poignant, funny, and beautifully unabashed" (Cheryl Strayed) bestselling essay collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she going with friends? Wouldn't it be incredibly lonely? The North route is better! Was it safe for a woman? The Southern route is the way to go! You should bring mace! And a common one... why? But Abbi had always found comfort in solitude, and needed space to step back and hit the reset button. As she spent time in each city and town on her way to Los Angeles, she mulled over the big questions-- What do I really want? What is the worst possible scenario in which I could run into my ex? How has the decision to wear my shirts tucked in been pivotal in my adulthood? In this collection of anecdotes, observations and reflections--all told in the sharp, wildly funny, and relatable voice that has endeared Abbi to critics and fans alike--readers will feel like they're in the passenger seat on a fun and, ultimately, inspiring journey. With some original illustrations by the author.


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New York Times Bestseller From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a "poignant, funny, and beautifully unabashed" (Cheryl Strayed) bestselling essay collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across t New York Times Bestseller From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a "poignant, funny, and beautifully unabashed" (Cheryl Strayed) bestselling essay collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew. When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she going with friends? Wouldn't it be incredibly lonely? The North route is better! Was it safe for a woman? The Southern route is the way to go! You should bring mace! And a common one... why? But Abbi had always found comfort in solitude, and needed space to step back and hit the reset button. As she spent time in each city and town on her way to Los Angeles, she mulled over the big questions-- What do I really want? What is the worst possible scenario in which I could run into my ex? How has the decision to wear my shirts tucked in been pivotal in my adulthood? In this collection of anecdotes, observations and reflections--all told in the sharp, wildly funny, and relatable voice that has endeared Abbi to critics and fans alike--readers will feel like they're in the passenger seat on a fun and, ultimately, inspiring journey. With some original illustrations by the author.

30 review for I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff

  1. 4 out of 5

    Janday

    I want to give this book to all of my friends. I want to encourage us to write the shit out because we all need therapists and none of us can afford them. In a world where everything is so damn performative, Abby's voice isn't clear, nor is it fresh: it's one of a rambling, borderline obsessive overthinker. That selfsame voice screaming at us about that one time we mispronounced a word in front of our crush in eighth grade when we're now 35 and it's 3:32am and wehaveameetinginfivehoursforthelove I want to give this book to all of my friends. I want to encourage us to write the shit out because we all need therapists and none of us can afford them. In a world where everything is so damn performative, Abby's voice isn't clear, nor is it fresh: it's one of a rambling, borderline obsessive overthinker. That selfsame voice screaming at us about that one time we mispronounced a word in front of our crush in eighth grade when we're now 35 and it's 3:32am and wehaveameetinginfivehoursfortheloveofallthatisholy! The Anxiety in Me recognizes the Anxiety in You, Abbi. And I hope more of us can open up and be more honest with ourselves. I read an advance digital manuscript of this book that I obtained as an employee of Hachette Book Group.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    Rant Review From An Avid Broad City Viewer: I Might Regret This by Abbi Jacobson I was over the moon excited when I found this was out in the world and also (low-key) mad that I wasn't informed earlier of this release. Broad City was one of my highlights of September 2017, when I first discovered and watched the series with the release of season four, and featured my commentary and all the details on the show in my wrap up of the month. In hindsight, I guess some things are better left unread, l Rant Review From An Avid Broad City Viewer: I Might Regret This by Abbi Jacobson I was over the moon excited when I found this was out in the world and also (low-key) mad that I wasn't informed earlier of this release. Broad City was one of my highlights of September 2017, when I first discovered and watched the series with the release of season four, and featured my commentary and all the details on the show in my wrap up of the month. In hindsight, I guess some things are better left unread, like angry emails or rant-y reads. Going into this having left two disappointing books prior, I was hoping for a pick-me-up in the form of Abbi Jacobson's writing voice. I checked out the audiobook - read by the author - and it was a joy to discover her words read with such intending and meaning; Abbi Jacobson doesn’t just read her words, she lives through them. While reading, I also realized that this was my first foray into the author's solo work without Ilana being there to balance out her more every-day-awkwardness. It got me wondering which part of the Broad City duo I essentially enjoy more when they're apart. After reading nearly three chapters, it dawned on me pretty quickly... Source As much as I enjoy a good tangent, I'd like to, at some point in the storyline, reach the bigger picture, you know, the one mentioned in the title and then never elaborated on till the very rapid end... This is usually where Ilana comes in to balance out Abbi's long-winded talks with humor to light up the scene, so I found that aspect to be repeatedly missing in the essays. It's just that I'd rather not be taken through pages of discussion on her junk mail disposing routine and what that fully entails with the many different categories they're divided in. By the time she gets to the point, on finding a long-lost letter, I've already forgotten what the essay title was about. And this effect only snowballed the more she went on. It's at this point that I was extremely thankful for the 2X speed on audio. It got me wondering whether a certain word count was trying to be met?? Because Abbi Jacobson had so many worthy components to elaborate on (like discussing the actual seventy-year-old letter that reached her, her road trip which starts off the book but isn't mentioned for at least three chapters, the actual relationship she first experienced) but she either skims over the highlights in a quick paragraph or wraps it up in a speedy end, opting to discuss detailed throwaway things . And it made me feel slowly more riled up the more I found random tangents thrown my way. I'm perplexed as to why the audiobook is over six hours when that time could've been cut in half with all these rants on what-ifs and building up any possible scenario (that'll never happen) before and after the event... but then the event itself is barely discussed in detail. Like the chase to hunt down the owners of the seventy-year-old letter, which she spent romanticizing in plenty of paragraphs wondering what if, when in reality it was wrapped up in one page. Nonfiction essays are supposed to be a fun, easy-breezy read for me, like I recently experienced while listening to Anne Bogel's “I'd Rather Be Reading,” which cuts short at just over two hours. I wanted to be left wanting something more, which is what Broad City excels at with its 20-minute episodes. But this book just left me wanting something else. I jumped on any opportunity to be distracted in a google search by her mentions in the book, such as her friend's chase after the rightful owner behind the developed film found in a blizzard. I can appreciate a long tangent and vibe if it’s on a topic the writer personally cares about and I get to experience the excitement through her words, but Jacobson chose to elaborate on details that are usually cut in the second draft. There's a lot of pages filled with dreaming and fantasizing, but little to no actual time spent on the action of the event. She even acknowledges the same: “I’m going to go farther away from the B&B for a moment, because tangents are the most effective way I have to stall going to what I feel might be an extremely uncomfortable breakfast full of me halfheartedly making small talk over mediocre pastries. ” She goes again into an ‘I wonder what will happen…’ spiral when staying for the first time at a B&B on her road trip, instead of just skipping straight ahead to what actually went down. This occurs way too many times in her writing to make the book enjoyable to read for me. The fact is that she build-up so many possibilities in her head of what might happen so that it creates this effect of disappointment when the real-life event finally comes around to being discussed and pales in comparison. I mean, this is when you know the rants are bad: “While we’re here, I also want to touch on the whole saucer issue—” Plus: a whole chapter dedicated to all the items in her car for the 10-hour drive ahead. This is also where the frustrations hits rock bottom because there are so many moments when it’s acceptable to go in depth with something juicy, like Kelly Rippa holding an article about that same long-lost letter Abbi found from seventy years ago in her mail, which happens way before Broad City, and way before Kelly Rippa even appeared on the show. Like, was that ever mentioned in real life? Did Kelly remember delivering the story? So many details worth to elaborate on but are barely mentioned again. Even something as trivial as her friend’s last name being Bieber. Like, sure, go on a tangent about your junk mail and skip over this… Don’t mind me. There comes a point when you spend so much time wrapped up in fiction and fantasy that you tend to forget how simple and great real life can feel, how intimate and true. And I feel like this book lacked the intimate truths I was waiting to connect with, like those feelings evoked after watching a good episode of Broad City. So it's regrettable the good didn't come to outshine the bad because when Abbi Jacobson focuses on the subject in front of her she shines so brightly in her humor. She nails down so many specifics that had me nodding along. Like her do's and don'ts when it comes to her three-week road-trip. In the end, I just wish the author would've spent more time talking about herself, rather than wasting so many pages on unimportant details and scenarios that never came to happen. “Do not listen to Sia’s “Breathe Me.” If you must, do not be driving, especially not in a beautiful landscape. If you are, and it plays, do not by any means put your window down and picture your car driving through the expansive terrain from an aerial drone shot.”  Her insights are on-point: “SIDENOTE, “will-they-won’t-theys” are always will-theys, right?!” If you enjoy long-winded, off-the-page, stream-of-consciousness writing then  I Might Regret This  by Abbi Jacobson might be your kind of book. Make your bookish purchase through my Amazon Affiliate: I Might Regret This  by Abbi Jacobson. I’ll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils This review and more can be found on my blog.

  3. 5 out of 5

    BiblioBrandie

    I sent the publisher a fangirl email (always with the "I'm a librarian" mention) and begged for an advanced copy of this book. To my surprise, it worked! I quickly read through this collection of essays by one of my favorite funny ladies and her writing does not disappoint. Which really was not a surprise. There is so much to love within these pages...she's hilarious (I couldn't help but hear her voice as I was reading), there are some very touching moments (the long love letters to Ilana and he I sent the publisher a fangirl email (always with the "I'm a librarian" mention) and begged for an advanced copy of this book. To my surprise, it worked! I quickly read through this collection of essays by one of my favorite funny ladies and her writing does not disappoint. Which really was not a surprise. There is so much to love within these pages...she's hilarious (I couldn't help but hear her voice as I was reading), there are some very touching moments (the long love letters to Ilana and her mom are two of my favorite chapters), she includes some of her drawings, and there are some revealing moments (won't spoil!). It's exactly what I always hope for in a collection of personal essays. Sad it's over but my daughter was basically reading over my shoulder so she's happy I can pass it on to her now.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    Abbi Jacobson is cool, suave, and classy so it’s no surprise that her book is too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian

    I really enjoyed a lot of this book, especially as read by Abbi Jacobson in the audiobook. Her vulnerability in essays about her breakup and her musings on random topics were alternately moving and funny. However I can't help but feel like this memoir needed more editing, to push some of the essays further to get to the meat of the topic, to cut some of the tangents, and to give the book as a whole a structure or focus that made sense.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott S.

    Abby Jacobson - best known as one-half of TV's Broad City duo - is just all over the place here . . . Literally - Ms. Jacobson (a southeast Pennsylvania native - woot woot!) details her solo drive across the U.S. starting in New York City, with stops in Memphis, Tennessee; Austin, Texas; and Santa Fe, New Mexico, along with various smaller locales and some scenic locations out west. This is done in the aftermath of a relationship - her first with a another woman - that recently ended, so there i Abby Jacobson - best known as one-half of TV's Broad City duo - is just all over the place here . . . Literally - Ms. Jacobson (a southeast Pennsylvania native - woot woot!) details her solo drive across the U.S. starting in New York City, with stops in Memphis, Tennessee; Austin, Texas; and Santa Fe, New Mexico, along with various smaller locales and some scenic locations out west. This is done in the aftermath of a relationship - her first with a another woman - that recently ended, so there is a lot of navel-gazing and reflection interspersed with the humor / drama about being a single woman in her 30's. Random observations and hand-drawn sketches also pepper the chapters breaks. Her recounting of her early days, when trying to break into NYC's comedy writing / performing world, were interesting and reminiscent of similar chapters in books by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. There was a particularly nice section towards the end in which she speaks lovingly of her hearing-impaired mother, who sounds like quite a character. ("My mom is unlike anyone I've ever met. Her capacity to love and thoughtfulness towards others have been through lines in her life . . . her enthusiasm for life is roaring.") Additionally, Jacobson speaks highly of her mother's longtime boyfriend - her parents had amicably divorced when she was in high school - who had passed away unexpectedly in 2001, and she notes with some regret in hindsight that she could've been more pleasant towards / accepting of him but was (perhaps understandably) stuck in 'angsty teenager' mode at the time. I was not a viewer of Broad City - which is now ending after five seasons - but now I'm interested in checking it out, as well as any further books Ms. Jacobson has to offer.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Hager

    Confession time: I haven't watched Broad City (although it's been on my radar and I do want to watch; I'll probably binge pretty soon) and I accepted a pitch for this because Cheryl Strayed blurbed the cover. (And because I tend to love memoirs by funny women, regardless of my familiarity with their work.) I said that to say this: I am now a huge fan of Abbi Jacobson. This book is as funny as you'd expect (maybe even funnier; suffice to say it's a fantastic read) but she's also incredibly honest. Confession time: I haven't watched Broad City (although it's been on my radar and I do want to watch; I'll probably binge pretty soon) and I accepted a pitch for this because Cheryl Strayed blurbed the cover. (And because I tend to love memoirs by funny women, regardless of my familiarity with their work.) I said that to say this: I am now a huge fan of Abbi Jacobson. This book is as funny as you'd expect (maybe even funnier; suffice to say it's a fantastic read) but she's also incredibly honest. I'm not sure I've ever related to a stranger as much as I've related to her in this. (Her sleep study chapters, you guys. I feel like if you've ever had any problems sleeping, you'll know where this is coming from.) I expected to enjoy this book and I expected it to make me even more excited to watch Broad City. I didn't expect to completely love it and read it in a day. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    broad city is one of my all time favorite shows. it’s smart, funny, and unique. it shows us what our twenties are supposed to be like. so it was only obvious that i would read one of the co-creators memoir. i cannot believe i’m giving this book a two star rating. i wanted to bring it up to a three, but then i’d be lying to myself and to you. so much of the book felt fruitless. so much of this book was just over anxious rambling and underdeveloped life stories and advice. when there were chapters broad city is one of my all time favorite shows. it’s smart, funny, and unique. it shows us what our twenties are supposed to be like. so it was only obvious that i would read one of the co-creators memoir. i cannot believe i’m giving this book a two star rating. i wanted to bring it up to a three, but then i’d be lying to myself and to you. so much of the book felt fruitless. so much of this book was just over anxious rambling and underdeveloped life stories and advice. when there were chapters that i liked, they still weren’t great. even some of the advice felt redundant and cliche. just overall a really disappointing read from a person i love.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    I love Broad City and Abbi is a great comedian. I listened to her read the audiobook and enjoyed it. From what I gathered, the overarching story is that Abbi goes on a road trip after her first big breakup. She goes on long tangents for most of the book, but keeps returning to the road trip throughout the memoir. It was a very, very loose thread holding this together. After listening to the whole audiobook and then sleeping on it, I’ve already forgotten the end of her trip as I sit down to write I love Broad City and Abbi is a great comedian. I listened to her read the audiobook and enjoyed it. From what I gathered, the overarching story is that Abbi goes on a road trip after her first big breakup. She goes on long tangents for most of the book, but keeps returning to the road trip throughout the memoir. It was a very, very loose thread holding this together. After listening to the whole audiobook and then sleeping on it, I’ve already forgotten the end of her trip as I sit down to write this review. There were parts of this that were relatable, insightful, and funny. Then there were times I felt the amount of details were tedious. For example, she chronologically lists her thoughts and actions while she can’t sleep. The only thing more boring than my own insomnia is hearing about someone else’s.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Boyer

    I love Broad City and Abbi to start with and this was just an easy, fun read - essays written while on a solo road trip trying to figure out some personal stuff. Some chapters were REALLY good (finding comedy, meeting Ilana, filming Broad City) and some felt like filler. Overall, I'd only recommend this if you're already a fan or are just looking for an easy read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Get the audio book. You won't regret it. Abbi tells her stories and short rants effortlessly. I felt that she was so relatable while discussing her inner conflicts and going through heartbreak. Going on a cross country road trip solo is bad ass in its own but I like that she took the time to do it her way, without taking everyone's advice on must do's (something I'd like to try on my next trip). I really enjoyed the parts where she spoke about her step dad, mom, and Ilana. Now to figure out how Get the audio book. You won't regret it. Abbi tells her stories and short rants effortlessly. I felt that she was so relatable while discussing her inner conflicts and going through heartbreak. Going on a cross country road trip solo is bad ass in its own but I like that she took the time to do it her way, without taking everyone's advice on must do's (something I'd like to try on my next trip). I really enjoyed the parts where she spoke about her step dad, mom, and Ilana. Now to figure out how to look at the photos and drawings from the audio book...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Crupi

    Abbi needs Ilana. This was not great.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tessy Consentino

    Abbi is me and I am Abbi.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katherine D. Morgan

    I never really watched Broad City, but I know of the show and did like what I watched. There are some parts of this book that I really loved. Reading about Abbi’s heartbreak was comforting, because I’m going through my own at this moment. Reading about the creation of Broad City and meeting Ilana and discovering their mutual love of comedy was empowering. Abbi is a boss ass bitch, but I don’t think that she truly knows it. She’s funny and she is wise, and those bits and pieces of the book were t I never really watched Broad City, but I know of the show and did like what I watched. There are some parts of this book that I really loved. Reading about Abbi’s heartbreak was comforting, because I’m going through my own at this moment. Reading about the creation of Broad City and meeting Ilana and discovering their mutual love of comedy was empowering. Abbi is a boss ass bitch, but I don’t think that she truly knows it. She’s funny and she is wise, and those bits and pieces of the book were the best by far. The other half of the book tended to ramble. Abbi has a habit of going on these long winded tangents that just never seemed to end. There were a few times that my eyes glazed over or I flipped the pages a little faster for a chapter to end. I like the fact that you got to dive into Abbi’s mind, because it’s how my mind works as well. What if I see my ex in the parking lot and I drop a jug of milk on the ground and it explodes all over me? What if I see my ex and I have salad in my teeth? These are all valid thoughts and I did enjoy them; I would have enjoyed them more if they didn’t make up most of the book to be honest. All in all, I would still recommend this book. It’s a fast read (there’s a lot of illustrations, but also, the book is still pretty good!) and it allowed me to be open and honest about so many things with myself. 3 stars for you, Abbi!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lexa

    WHO HURT ABBI SHE IS P E R F E C T

  16. 4 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    Weird..but endearing. Abbi has a lot going on in her life. I mean, I guess that could be said about any young woman fighting her way towards her career goals and trying to deal with love, heartbreak, anxiety, depression, etc. But you really get the sense of how overwhelmed she feels in these "essays"/"journals" where she's just driving around trying to seek peace in a variety of places. Abbi seems a lot like her character in Broad City though she says she differs in the sense that she's an introv Weird..but endearing. Abbi has a lot going on in her life. I mean, I guess that could be said about any young woman fighting her way towards her career goals and trying to deal with love, heartbreak, anxiety, depression, etc. But you really get the sense of how overwhelmed she feels in these "essays"/"journals" where she's just driving around trying to seek peace in a variety of places. Abbi seems a lot like her character in Broad City though she says she differs in the sense that she's an introvert, whereas BC's Abbi is an extrovert?? This book illustrated that on a base-level they're really the same person; whether she wants to recognize it or not. This book sometimes felt like a test in my patience, if I'm going to be honest.. it just felt like writing for writing sake. The naval-gazing was at an all-time high with only hints and whispers of important conversations breaking through the noise and nonsensical static. The art was funny & cute tho, so there's that.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    Best book I've read in a year.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I love Abbi Jacobson and her work, but this book was a bit uneven. It shines where she is most specific in her stories (I.e. visiting an aura reader in Sedona) where I am often laughing and crying in the same breath. When she is speaking in generalities about life on the road or after a breakup or whatever it may be, I found myself drifting a bit. Sure, it’s relatable—but not in a way that is novel or makes you see those experiences in a new way. All in all, I enjoyed getting the chance to have I love Abbi Jacobson and her work, but this book was a bit uneven. It shines where she is most specific in her stories (I.e. visiting an aura reader in Sedona) where I am often laughing and crying in the same breath. When she is speaking in generalities about life on the road or after a breakup or whatever it may be, I found myself drifting a bit. Sure, it’s relatable—but not in a way that is novel or makes you see those experiences in a new way. All in all, I enjoyed getting the chance to have the author in my ear for a few hours.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy Polyreader

    Exactly the revitalizing read I needed! Humorous, engaging and self-reflective. I was lucky enough to be sent a copy from the publisher pre-release date, and I just devoured this in a few short sittings. Full review to come on the blog!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    A total delight! Equal parts poignant and funny, Abbi has a really cool perspective.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Smith

    A lovely, well-paced read. Such a special experience hearing some of Abbi’s vulnerabilities. Incredibly relatable, funny, and kind.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Silcox

    I really enjoyed this book. It felt like a conversation with a good friend that can be silly, vulnerable and profound all at the same time. I appreciated Abbi’s openness throughout the whole book and I was sad to finish it because I wanted more. I hope she continues to write more books!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    A bit scattered, a bit anxiety-producing, very relatable. During the moments in which she talked about having to plan out trips to places she's never been, allowing herself an extra thirty minutes, the anxiety of finding a parking spot, all that jazz and I'm like, "Yeah, I do that. Is that something most people don't do?" Anyway, I listened to the audiobook, and she reads it amazingly (obviously, she does voice acting, after all). However, you miss out on the drawings unless you're sitting there A bit scattered, a bit anxiety-producing, very relatable. During the moments in which she talked about having to plan out trips to places she's never been, allowing herself an extra thirty minutes, the anxiety of finding a parking spot, all that jazz and I'm like, "Yeah, I do that. Is that something most people don't do?" Anyway, I listened to the audiobook, and she reads it amazingly (obviously, she does voice acting, after all). However, you miss out on the drawings unless you're sitting there with the PDF file open. Man, this is a terrible review, I'm sorry. It's lunch and I'm beat. You guys ever have those days? Mondays, amirite? Read (or listen to) this book, though, it's interesting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    jenice

    i absolute love abbi and i try to support her any way i can, si when i heard she had a book coming out, i was HYPED. i have a very similar thought process to abbi’s so that really boosted my enjoyment of this book because i felt like i was catching everything she was throwing. i can definitely see why other would not like this as much as i did, but i just had a blast going through this and it made me reevaluate some shit in my life

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cami

    I'm a big fan of break-up literature, and there's a lot to like here. Abbi's voice is funny and vulnerable, but something just didn't connect for me. I've read a lot of essay collections in the past couple years and this one isn't really on my favorites list?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Waffle

    Ultimately this book is not much, and yet here I am with four stars to dole out. I have a soft spot for the mundane. I love queer awakening. I feel the anxieties. Did it go anywhere? No, but...isn’t that the point?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Delaney

    I regret it, I really do.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erica Solomon

    Some books increase in goodness because they come into your life right when you need them most. I needed this book right now.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Adams

    Listening to Abbi's voice really pushed this into the 5-star arena. As a voice actress on top of her comedic presence, she is able to capture a lovely balance between vulnerability and humor.

  30. 4 out of 5

    shirley

    I just...really loved this. Tender and funny and smart.

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