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Analog, Vol. 1

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It's 2024, and the internet is only for porn after the world is mass-doxxed. Every email, photo, and document ever sent rains down out of the cloud, and only a fool would send a secret over the web. This is the era of the "Paper Jockeys: " armed couriers with a briefcase of secrets that will get your sensitive information around the globe or die trying. Human punching-bag It's 2024, and the internet is only for porn after the world is mass-doxxed. Every email, photo, and document ever sent rains down out of the cloud, and only a fool would send a secret over the web. This is the era of the "Paper Jockeys: " armed couriers with a briefcase of secrets that will get your sensitive information around the globe or die trying. Human punching-bag Jack McGinnis and his partner Oona are two of the best couriers in the business. For a price, they'll move your sensitive information where it needs to go as they fight off fascists, criminals, and spies. From new star David O'Sullivan and Gerry Duggan, writer of Deadpool and Uncanny Avengers. Collects ANALOG #1-5


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It's 2024, and the internet is only for porn after the world is mass-doxxed. Every email, photo, and document ever sent rains down out of the cloud, and only a fool would send a secret over the web. This is the era of the "Paper Jockeys: " armed couriers with a briefcase of secrets that will get your sensitive information around the globe or die trying. Human punching-bag It's 2024, and the internet is only for porn after the world is mass-doxxed. Every email, photo, and document ever sent rains down out of the cloud, and only a fool would send a secret over the web. This is the era of the "Paper Jockeys: " armed couriers with a briefcase of secrets that will get your sensitive information around the globe or die trying. Human punching-bag Jack McGinnis and his partner Oona are two of the best couriers in the business. For a price, they'll move your sensitive information where it needs to go as they fight off fascists, criminals, and spies. From new star David O'Sullivan and Gerry Duggan, writer of Deadpool and Uncanny Avengers. Collects ANALOG #1-5

30 review for Analog, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    On the face of it Analog is a futuristic noir about your stereotypical private detective-type - trenchcoat, booze, clipped narration, dame troubles - who does shady stuff for shady types. That’d be ok by itself but Gerry Duggan tries to do more and ends up with a muddled mess of boring nonsense instead. Our anti-hero is Jack McGinnis, a “Ledger Man”, which looks to mean that he delivers packages to mob-types but later on he acts as a hitman, private investigator and basically whatever else the p On the face of it Analog is a futuristic noir about your stereotypical private detective-type - trenchcoat, booze, clipped narration, dame troubles - who does shady stuff for shady types. That’d be ok by itself but Gerry Duggan tries to do more and ends up with a muddled mess of boring nonsense instead. Our anti-hero is Jack McGinnis, a “Ledger Man”, which looks to mean that he delivers packages to mob-types but later on he acts as a hitman, private investigator and basically whatever else the plot needs him to be. Oh and he “destroyed the web” apparently even though it looks like it still very obviously exists? And he’s being blackmailed by “Aunt Sam” (the feminised version of “Uncle Sam” because PC) to do something with AI that’s inhabiting various robot animals…? Er, yeah, it’s overcomplicated and silly to say the least. After that cracking opening scene in St Louis which had that unexpected repetition to it that made it stand out, things went downhill fast and never improved. I don’t know why half of the things in this book are happening and I don’t care enough to go back and re-read it to find out as I won’t be continuing with this series and I suspect the answer is bullshit anyway. The world building is unconvincing, underwritten and shaky at best - apparently 2024 America is, sigh, a fascist state. There are, good lord, concentration camps, and Jack’s on-again-off-again wife/girlfriend/doesn’t matter is a hero for killing literal Nazis - so basically the far-left’s wet dream come true. There are underground speakeasies because I guess alcohol has become prohibited again and also illegal drinking dens are the best way to hide illegal immigrants… ? Duggan can write well occasionally but he’s wiffing it big style here. I wasn’t that impressed with David O’Sullivan’s art. Oh, which brings me to the weirdest problem with this book: Jack starts off as a white guy and then, two issues in, his skin turns bright pink/purple for no reason! Whaaaaaat?! Combined with that chin and he looked like a less bulky Thanos cosplaying as a generic gumshoe! Jordie Bellaire’s a fine colourist but I have no idea what she was thinking there. It’s so unnecessarily distracting! And it’s not some printing error either as Jack’s in some scenes with others, like Aunt Sam, who’re white like he was at the start but he’s still pink/purple! Analog’s a pile of pants - I wouldn’t recommend it. For a better futuristic post-internet-cloud-crash-crime-type comic, check out Brian K Vaughan and Marcos Martin’s The Private Eye instead.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Analog is set in the near future of 2024 when the entire internet was doxxed and everybody's personal information became public knowledge. In this world, Jack McGiniss works as an armed paper courier who delivers secret information from and to whoever trades in it, but he's also tangled in his own world of shit. I really enjoyed this one! Gerry Duggan's Marvel stuff is usually hit or miss for me (primarily because I don't like Deadpool, and that's the character he usually writes), so I was pleasa Analog is set in the near future of 2024 when the entire internet was doxxed and everybody's personal information became public knowledge. In this world, Jack McGiniss works as an armed paper courier who delivers secret information from and to whoever trades in it, but he's also tangled in his own world of shit. I really enjoyed this one! Gerry Duggan's Marvel stuff is usually hit or miss for me (primarily because I don't like Deadpool, and that's the character he usually writes), so I was pleasantly surprised to find out his new (first?) creator-owned series at Image is a really enjoyable and entertaining romp. This book borrows certain elements from film noir — the protagonist is a hard-boiled alcoholic human punching bag with a tough guy inner monologue, he likes to walk in the rain and brood about how the world went to shit, and his equally hard-boiled lady friend sometimes gets into trouble that he has to get her out of. But the book also doesn't take itself too seriously — it has plenty of quality ironic humour (Duggan's years of writing Deadpool definitely show). The characters are fun to follow around, their interactions are delightful, and the story is quite gripping and well told. It did lose me a little bit in an episode where Jack went to Japan on one of his assignments, that's when it started to introduce a certain concept that I felt was confusing and out of place. Thankfully, Duggan didn't dwell on it too much and the plot moved on from there quickly enough. Overall, Analog volume 1 is a really nice read that shows a lot of Gerry Duggan's writing talent, something I wish I could enjoy more often in his Marvel work. I really was pleasantly surprised by this comic and will be looking forward to volume 2.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Melding hard-boiled noir with a post-Facebook breach world is a brilliant idea. When nothing is private, the world’s only choice is to turn to Analog Volume 1. In 2023, Jack is a Ledger Man, a paper jockey hired to move confidential papers from place to place. He also literally broke the Internet. Now people have no privacy at all. Many welcome the all access. For those that don’t, Jack is hired. The government wants to break up Jack’s monopoly on confidentiality. “Aunt Sam” uses Jack’s loved one Melding hard-boiled noir with a post-Facebook breach world is a brilliant idea. When nothing is private, the world’s only choice is to turn to Analog Volume 1. In 2023, Jack is a Ledger Man, a paper jockey hired to move confidential papers from place to place. He also literally broke the Internet. Now people have no privacy at all. Many welcome the all access. For those that don’t, Jack is hired. The government wants to break up Jack’s monopoly on confidentiality. “Aunt Sam” uses Jack’s loved ones to coerce him to breach his clients’ documents. An old enemy returns forcing Jack to retreat. Jack is in hiding but not for long... Analog Volume 1 has excellent worldbuilding. The art is suitably dark. I just wish that the characters were more fleshed out. I’m unclear about the back stories and underlying motivations of all three main characters: Jack, his father and Oona, Jack’s girlfriend. I also expected more sarcastic humor from the author of Deadpool. Hopefully, future volumes will fulfill my wishes. I will definitely pick up the next one because the setting is awesome. Putting noir characters in a future setting has been done before. Fans of those tales like Blade Runner and Looper will enjoy this dark look into the future. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Thanks to Image Comics and Edelweiss+ for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    3.5* The world has gone completely digital. No secret is safe. If you want information coughed you send in someone like Jack. It has this Brubaker type noir to the story but it never quite hits the mark. It kinda doesnt take itself seriously. We still get Duggans trademark humour and comedic dialgoue. The artwork is ok but Ive seen much better. The story isnt overly exciting nor is the main character. Solid first outing but probably will gove volume 2 a miss. Will still check out what Duggan has 3.5* The world has gone completely digital. No secret is safe. If you want information coughed you send in someone like Jack. It has this Brubaker type noir to the story but it never quite hits the mark. It kinda doesnt take itself seriously. We still get Duggans trademark humour and comedic dialgoue. The artwork is ok but Ive seen much better. The story isnt overly exciting nor is the main character. Solid first outing but probably will gove volume 2 a miss. Will still check out what Duggan has to offer with other stories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    When I saw the initial press and previews for this, I couldn't work out why Image were publishing something which just looked like a dull version of another book whose physical edition they already handle, Vaughan and Martin's The Private Eye. Here, as there, the internet suddenly disgorged everyone's secrets, leading a scarred and chastened society back to offline life. But where The Private Eye suggested it would make the world more interesting, a riot of tiny subcultures and extravagant costu When I saw the initial press and previews for this, I couldn't work out why Image were publishing something which just looked like a dull version of another book whose physical edition they already handle, Vaughan and Martin's The Private Eye. Here, as there, the internet suddenly disgorged everyone's secrets, leading a scarred and chastened society back to offline life. But where The Private Eye suggested it would make the world more interesting, a riot of tiny subcultures and extravagant costuming as people's urge to curate moved off their screens, Analog appeared to suggest a return to the drabness of the 1950s-80s, lots of grey men in grey suits arguing in grey landscapes. Why bother? And yet, I gave it a go, because it was on Edelweiss as an ARC so fairly risk-free, and it turns out that preview was seriously underselling it. For one thing, The Private Eye wrapped in 2015, before Cambridge Analytica and Russian bots helped send the world insane. So where that book was a bit old-man-shouts-at-Cloud in its complaints about the young people and their screens, this one has a far more pressing reason for its anger, even if it does slightly overplay its hand with the Zuckerberg stand-in, who's outright villainous and megalomaniacal instead of the somewhat hapless figure the real version has always struck me as. For another, Analog takes the position that given the degree to which the web has exposed many of us as exhibitionists, then even when all our secrets are revealed, there are people who'll just say 'Fuck it' and carry on with their weird lives out in the open. And that partial withdrawal from the net seems much more plausible than The Private Eye's total shutdown; it's just that nobody trusts anything that needs to be secure on there. Which does make me wonder about the way the Internet of Things seems to be everywhere here – not just delivery drones and driverless cars, but dogwalking bots and tourist guides. Surely, if the myth of online security has been exposed, nobody's going to allow roads full of hackable vehicles? Still, that's a rare mis-step in the worldbuilding; even its more jaw-dropping moments, like the new turn the surveillance state takes in an offline world, feel horribly plausible given how ridiculous the world's become lately. And the story which takes place against that backdrop? Well, yeah, that is fairly noir - a hard man who nonetheless gets beaten up a lot, his righteous femme fatale lover, double-crosses and bodies dropping, all that. But the art sells it with sufficient personality that it doesn't come across too rote, and I ended up caring what happens to these people in a way I don't always with a Rucka or Brubaker story in similar territory.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandon St Mark

    If I’m honest, this more four stars but I’m bumping it up because the overall rating on Goodreads is too low. This was a really fun book and I like the noir style. The main character was fun to follow and I really like Oona (I believe that’s how it was spelt, the font made it seem like an O or a D, not 100% sure which one but I think O). Definitely gonna pick up the next volume. Not sure why this is rated so low tbh. I don’t think it does much new in the noir genre besides maybe the setting, but i If I’m honest, this more four stars but I’m bumping it up because the overall rating on Goodreads is too low. This was a really fun book and I like the noir style. The main character was fun to follow and I really like Oona (I believe that’s how it was spelt, the font made it seem like an O or a D, not 100% sure which one but I think O). Definitely gonna pick up the next volume. Not sure why this is rated so low tbh. I don’t think it does much new in the noir genre besides maybe the setting, but it was still a lot of fun to read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    This was a good future-noir comic, with a great premise – it's unfortunate, then, that of the five issues in this trade, one really fell flat with me. In the near future, the whole Internet is open to everyone, and nothing digital can be called private, so Private Eye-types act as couriers of secretive documents. Our hero is one such, until he gets leaned on to share those secrets with someone else. That's fine – it's a gritty world, with a voice-over to match, but where the problem comes in is This was a good future-noir comic, with a great premise – it's unfortunate, then, that of the five issues in this trade, one really fell flat with me. In the near future, the whole Internet is open to everyone, and nothing digital can be called private, so Private Eye-types act as couriers of secretive documents. Our hero is one such, until he gets leaned on to share those secrets with someone else. That's fine – it's a gritty world, with a voice-over to match, but where the problem comes in is that our man has a past. For he was one of those that killed the Internet, which for some reason means he has to go to a weird playground-like abode and talk to a collection of avatars of some AI. That is going to key in to the bigger story, for sure – but that's not the best of news, when the rest of the book, with all the twists and turns and machinations our man faces and causes, is perfectly fine. Memorable characters, a quick Millaresque sense of humour, and a well-played milieu, still make this as one to be interested in, but that downer makes the rating one that's given quite grudgingly. Optimistically, but grudgingly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    A Little Rough, But the Patter's Snappy Our hero is a courier. Since the internet has been opened wide and all secrets have been revealed anything important is put on paper and hand carried. So what you get here is sort of future-dystopia throwback. That's a nice angle. The artwork is a little rough, but it's effective. Our hero, Jack, has the snappy patter down - whether facing assassins, taking a new job from a corrupt smoothie, or needling his Dad, he's got the right line. This is clever, edgy A Little Rough, But the Patter's Snappy Our hero is a courier. Since the internet has been opened wide and all secrets have been revealed anything important is put on paper and hand carried. So what you get here is sort of future-dystopia throwback. That's a nice angle. The artwork is a little rough, but it's effective. Our hero, Jack, has the snappy patter down - whether facing assassins, taking a new job from a corrupt smoothie, or needling his Dad, he's got the right line. This is clever, edgy or witty enough to keep me reading, and I'm curious to see where we go from here. An interesting indie find. (Please note that I had a chance to read a free ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    There are two central ideas the the world this story is built in are based on, and only one of them really seems to play into the plot so far - the idea of the global doxxing is interesting but irrelevant beyond a motivation for the neo-luddites and the importance of paper jockeys as the carriers of secrets. That being said, the story is very entertaining, as our protagonist Jack gets run through the wringer, gets co-opted by the US government (maybe), and has an... interesting experience in Japa There are two central ideas the the world this story is built in are based on, and only one of them really seems to play into the plot so far - the idea of the global doxxing is interesting but irrelevant beyond a motivation for the neo-luddites and the importance of paper jockeys as the carriers of secrets. That being said, the story is very entertaining, as our protagonist Jack gets run through the wringer, gets co-opted by the US government (maybe), and has an... interesting experience in Japan. The writing is sharp, and Jack (and Oona) make for fun and sympathetic protagonists, and the action is whip-smart too. I laughed out loud several times at this book, even though it's not really a comedy - it was just darkly cynical in a way that pushed my buttons perfectly. And that scene in Japan is very unique and I really enjoyed it. There's a fairly complete story in this volume, but I really hope Gerry Duggan continues it because he's got a fascinating situation built here that I would love to see more of. The art works well, supporting the story and capturing the different locales and characters very well. All told, a very pleasant surprise.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ogreart

    Cool premise. All Internet secrets have been revealed. There is no such thing as online privacy. The only way to hide information is to not put it on the web. This brings about the need for Ledger Men, couriers who transport paper documents from one place to another. Dangerous work. Good story. I think I'd like to keep reading this series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Diana Rangelova

    It was great and kept me interested from beginning to end. I have to say that Jack's father was my favourite character (the man loves his meatballs) and the relation between Oona and Jack was just perfect. The quotes at the end of each Issue were a good touch.

  12. 5 out of 5

    t.i.m

    2.5 Oh, the irony! I was reading a digital copy on my phone!!! Ee gads

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Payne

    Didn't really get into this one. The main character is a bit annoying and it's a bit too bloodthirsty for my tastes. Had to force myself through the last issue because I didn't care about anyone.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul Porry

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nora

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Villwock

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

  19. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  20. 5 out of 5

    Llama

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andy Vann

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mithun Gangopadhyay

  24. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nick Zambrano

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephane Beaulne

  29. 4 out of 5

    Duan Greally

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alan Waltrip

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