kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Everything's Trash, But It's Okay

Availability: Ready to download

From New York Times bestselling author and star of 2 Dope Queens , Phoebe Robinson, comes a new, hilarious, and timely essay collection on gender, race, dating, and a world that seems to always be a self-starting Dumpster fire. Wouldn't it be great if life came with an instruction manual? Of course, but like access to Michael B. Jordan's house, none of us are getti From New York Times bestselling author and star of 2 Dope Queens , Phoebe Robinson, comes a new, hilarious, and timely essay collection on gender, race, dating, and a world that seems to always be a self-starting Dumpster fire. Wouldn't it be great if life came with an instruction manual? Of course, but like access to Michael B. Jordan's house, none of us are getting any. Thankfully, Phoebe Robinson is ready to share everything she's experienced in hopes that if you can laugh at her topsy-turvy life, you can laugh at your own. Written in her trademark unfiltered and singularly witty style, Robinson's latest essay collection is a call to arms. She tackles a wide range of topics, such as giving feminism a tough love talk in hopes it can become more intersectional; telling society's beauty standards to kick rocks; and demanding that toxic masculinity close its mouth and legs (enough with the manspreading already!), and get out of the way so true progress can happen. Robinson also gets personal, exploring debt she has hidden from her parents, how dating is mainly a warmed-over bowl of hot mess, and maybe most importantly, meeting Bono not once, but twice. She's struggled with being a woman with a political mind and a woman with an ever-changing jean size. She knows about trash not only because she sees it every day, but also because she's seen about one hundred thousand hours of reality TV and zero hours of Schindler's List. Everything's Trash, But It's Okay is a candid perspective for a generation that has had the rug pulled out from under it too many times to count, as well as an intimate conversation with a new best friend.


Compare
kode adsense disini

From New York Times bestselling author and star of 2 Dope Queens , Phoebe Robinson, comes a new, hilarious, and timely essay collection on gender, race, dating, and a world that seems to always be a self-starting Dumpster fire. Wouldn't it be great if life came with an instruction manual? Of course, but like access to Michael B. Jordan's house, none of us are getti From New York Times bestselling author and star of 2 Dope Queens , Phoebe Robinson, comes a new, hilarious, and timely essay collection on gender, race, dating, and a world that seems to always be a self-starting Dumpster fire. Wouldn't it be great if life came with an instruction manual? Of course, but like access to Michael B. Jordan's house, none of us are getting any. Thankfully, Phoebe Robinson is ready to share everything she's experienced in hopes that if you can laugh at her topsy-turvy life, you can laugh at your own. Written in her trademark unfiltered and singularly witty style, Robinson's latest essay collection is a call to arms. She tackles a wide range of topics, such as giving feminism a tough love talk in hopes it can become more intersectional; telling society's beauty standards to kick rocks; and demanding that toxic masculinity close its mouth and legs (enough with the manspreading already!), and get out of the way so true progress can happen. Robinson also gets personal, exploring debt she has hidden from her parents, how dating is mainly a warmed-over bowl of hot mess, and maybe most importantly, meeting Bono not once, but twice. She's struggled with being a woman with a political mind and a woman with an ever-changing jean size. She knows about trash not only because she sees it every day, but also because she's seen about one hundred thousand hours of reality TV and zero hours of Schindler's List. Everything's Trash, But It's Okay is a candid perspective for a generation that has had the rug pulled out from under it too many times to count, as well as an intimate conversation with a new best friend.

30 review for Everything's Trash, But It's Okay

  1. 4 out of 5

    Roxane

    Phoebe Robinson brings her infectious charm and utterly delightful sense of humor to her second essay collection, Everything’s Trash But That’s Okay. From body image to contemporary feminism to our culture of overwork, Robinson offers deft cultural criticism and hilarious personal anecdotes that will make readers laugh, cringe, and cry. Everything may indeed be trash but writing like this reminds us that we’re gonna make it through all the terrible things with honesty, laughter, and faith. It’s Phoebe Robinson brings her infectious charm and utterly delightful sense of humor to her second essay collection, Everything’s Trash But That’s Okay. From body image to contemporary feminism to our culture of overwork, Robinson offers deft cultural criticism and hilarious personal anecdotes that will make readers laugh, cringe, and cry. Everything may indeed be trash but writing like this reminds us that we’re gonna make it through all the terrible things with honesty, laughter, and faith. It’s not a perfect book--at times, Robinson overwrites, gets lost in tangents, and uses five jokes to make a point where one or two would sufice but this is still well worth a read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    Anyway, as I was saying, women are conditioned to waste hours, days, weeks, months (although, truth be told, it's most likely years) doubting, undermining, and ultimately hating parts, if not all, of themselves based solely on "problems" with their bodies that can be solved by buying products from an industry that invented these problems in the first place. How fucking convenient. And when all is said and done, what is the prize for this self-torture? Fitting neatly within society's destructive Anyway, as I was saying, women are conditioned to waste hours, days, weeks, months (although, truth be told, it's most likely years) doubting, undermining, and ultimately hating parts, if not all, of themselves based solely on "problems" with their bodies that can be solved by buying products from an industry that invented these problems in the first place. How fucking convenient. And when all is said and done, what is the prize for this self-torture? Fitting neatly within society's destructive narrative about the female body. 22 So. I think this book is even better than Robinson's debut You Can't Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have to Explain. It's more current, more relevant, and funnier IMO. Which is hard to say, because I gave her first book five stars. Robinson's genius is combining feminism and anti-racism with comedy. I'm a feminist and it's hard for me to read feminist books. Feminist books are important and I do read them. But they make me severely depressed and usually also make me feel like I should never touch a man again. Which is ridiculous - I know some amazing men and definitely know men aren't trash - but it's like reading the newspaper. You don't even have to be a feminist and be ingesting feminist literature to know women are hated and shat on by society. Just read the paper in the morning. Bam. I read the paper yesterday and it was just full of disgusting actions against women which had taken place. When people argue about feminism not being needed any more because women and men are equal now, I just look at them like they've grown two heads. It's SO OBVIOUS this isn't true that my head spins every time someone tells me this. You can say the same thing about racism. But the reason people avoid educating themselves on racism and sexism is because they don't want to be depressed and they don't want to give up their comforts and they don't want to face reality. I understand. Reading feminist books and books about racism make me very depressed, too. I understand people wanting to stick their heads in the sand and pretend everything is just peachy and there are no problems anymore. I imagine it's the same urge that drives climate-change deniers. Robinson is a genius. I've heard people take her to task because she "sugarcoats" her messages about how women and POCs are shat on in modern American society. But in fact, her way of presenting knowledge about the female experience and the non-white experience in America is GENIUS. She is a genius. She's so funny. Parts of the book have absolutely nothing to do with sexism and racism. She talks about random stuff, music, her friends, food, working, whatever. She has you laughing out loud. Then she shifts to talking about how horrible the patriarchy is. It's not sudden, it's not jarring. It's brilliant. You're laughing and then you realize how shitty what she is describing actually is. Then you're laughing again. People complain about Robinson's super-casual Twitter-speak which is long, rambling, filled with hashtags and random abbreviations and quite frankly a way of writing which will be indecipherable to a lot of people. I understand. I'm either too old or not "social media" enough to understand what she is talking about a lot of the time. Let's take a look: There was Carrie Fisher (White Jesus, why?), Prince (Black Jesus, why?), George Michael (Levi Jeans Jesus, I can't), and David Bowie (Alien Jesus aka the feathers from Björk's swan dress at the 2001 Oscar ceremony < squawk, blergh, blop > - because y'all know Björk and anything in Björk's universe only communicates through sound). Oof. I don't know about you, but I was overcome with emotion at seeing so many pop culture icons pass. Utterly devastated. Heartbroken and beside myself. So I mourned like we all did. APPROPRIATELY. Okay, I didn't, but I tried. Well, I tried the way I do when the heater in my apartment is too high and instead of getting up to adjust the thermostat, I say to no one, "It's too hot," and then unzip my onesie down to my hips so that I end up looking like a caterpillar taking a cigarette break mid-metamorph-morph aka metamorphosis. #IgnorantAbbrev #SorryForWastingYourTime. Anyhoo, I did not try very hard NOT to be utterly inappropriate mere days after Bowie's death. When he passed, I feel down the usual internet rabbit hole many of us are wont to do when someone famous dies. I read think pieces, bought any albums I didn't already own, watched old performances on YouTube. After about forty-eight hours of this, I became an unofficial truther of Bowie's personal life, hoping that in my quest to unearth all the last unknown details about him, this busywork would distract me from the reality that we're all going to die. And since this mission was rooted in earnest and profound love for the dead, I felt like Doogie Howser at the end of Doogie Howser, M.D., just writing smart bon mots about what I'd learned. But I wasn't. My good intentions were quickly replaced by my just-below-the-surface hot mess tendencies. About three days after Bowie died and amid a particularly wide-eyed-and-awake-at-four-in-the-morning internet hunt, I typed this into Google: Did David Bowie have a big penis? I know, I know, I KNOW! And it's not like I pulled up Googs's "incognito window," which wouldn't have recorded this question in my browser's history. I typed this question in the broad-as-the-Alaskan-daylight-during-midnight-sun season aka Google's regular search window, where anyone could track what I'd done. To which, Google basically responded à la Danny Glover from the Lethal Weapon franchise, "I'm too old for this shit," and then set about unsuccessfully trying to save me from my trifling ways. I started with "Did David Bowie," and before I could continue, Google countered with this auto-complete: Did David Bowie wrote "My Way" What in the hell kind of poor-grammar-of-a-troubled-youth-from-Dangerous-Minds voodoo is this? Can't lie, I admire the tactic, but this search engine knew not who they were messing with. In my twenties, I once had a girls' sleepover and made us watch Showgirls. Then we went to bed, and when we woke up, I convinced them to watch Showgirls again. Clearly, my ignorance is only matched by my determination. Googs sounding like the "Cash Me Outside, How 'Bout Dat" girl was cute, but no way was that stopping me. 4 I know some people are thinking, "Oh, I can't read a book written like this." But hear me out. I'm not well-versed in pop culture nor am I on Twitter. But if you are shaking and scratching your head, let me tell you, by page 30 I was laughing out loud. Really belly-laughing. Robinson is FUNNY. I mean, she's FUNNY. She reminds me of Erma Bombeck (I'm dating myself) in the way she can describe a situation in a way that has you in stitches. Even when Robinson is describing something completely horrifying - one example is a man who has sex with her, and then immediately after sex says to her, "There are exercises that you can do to tone up your thighs.". Things go downhill from there, but Robinson describes this scenario in such a hilarious way I was laughing hard. That's her genius. So, this guy is an asshole and Robinson talks about a lot of male assholes in this book. She talks about getting sexually harassed, she talks about being demeaned and degraded by men she meets at parties, men she's dated, men she's slept with. She talks about how society treats women and how society treats black women and how horrifying it is. Of course, reading this it all sounds terribly depressing and like the book is a huge downer. But because Robinson coats all this with her excellent sense of humor, people can be LEARNING and LAUGHING at the same time. She is making you laugh but at the same time inside you are going, "Wow, that's fucked up. I never realized this sexist/racist reality before." It's genius. All kidding aside, it seems after doing an informal survey with my straight girlfriends, the whole negging post-coit is commonplace. Some have been told they get "too wet" down there, take too long to come, are not thin enough to date publicly but are good enough for "sex on the DL," and one buddy of mine, who is not particularly into period sex but decided to go for it with encouragement from a guy she was dating , was told by him MIDSEX that he didn't really enjoy the way her vagina smelled while she was on her period. Are. You. Fucking. Kidding. Me?! Unfortunately, women are all too familiar with this type of gross body-shaming; furthermore, it is behavior that, for far too long, some men have thought is perfectly acceptable. But before I get into how society has conditioned men to express all opinions, especially the hurtful ones, about women TO women, let's return to #Thighgate2010, because every lady I know - whether she is gay, straight, or anywhere on the sexuality spectrum - has self-esteem issues in part due to outside sources like Eric. And us women all respond differently. Some do work out more. Or eat more. Or starve. Or feel unworthy. 32 It would also be a mistake to brush off Robinson's intelligence, which is formidable. I think because of the way she talks (like a fifteen-year-old girl on Twitter) people might dismiss her. That would be a mistake. After talking about some random stuff and making you laugh about, IDK, talking to your parents about sex or something, on the next page she could be laying down knowledge like she's a professor of women's studies. I mean... I've been a feminist for a long time, and I have to say Robinson knows her shit. She knows what she is talking about, and it would be a real mistake to underestimate her or think she is a lightweight or a tumblr-feminist. No, she's for real. It might be tempting to lose sight of this considering how she conveys information - how can she be a feminist when she isn't even being serious? - but in reality, it's the exact opposite. She lulls you into being amused and calm and then seeds her pages with some hard-core feminist ideas. She gives you belly laughs about her shenanigans with her best friends and then slams you with how modern racism still permeates daily life. It's very smart. It's very well-done. It's a great way to feed feminism and anti-racism to people who may be reluctant to educating themselves on those points. She also takes on fat-shaming and spends a chapter talking about fat activism and how we can help the world be a better place for fat people. I loved this, I think it's very necessary to talk about this. Especially since she did include a rather tone-deaf comment about being fat in her previous book. Seems like she's turned around since then. I loved how she was standing up for fat rights in here as well as fighting discrimination against women and POC. I'm talking real actual shit. Instead of being silently complicit or only speaking up half the time, I'm talking about putting dudes in their place every damn time they think they can fat-shame women who are bigger than me. I cannot tell you the amount of times I've heard men, who think they are in a "safe space" with me, reveal what they truly feel about women who don't fall within societal beauty standards. Let me just say that "disgusting," "pig," "never would I ever fuck her," and many other objectionable comments often make the rounds. 54 She's a size 10/12, and I think after putting up with a lot of shit from men, like when one said to her, "I would never date a girl whose thighs spread when she sat down." 35 she kind of realized what horrible bullshit there is about being a fat person and the way people think they can judge and comment on women's bodies (which are never 'good enough,' even when they are 'thin') without consequence. It's a great chapter. I know people who were upset with the tiny shades of fat-shaming in the first book will be ecstatic by this turn of events. I know I've talked a lot about the racism, feminism, and fat-hatred that Robinson tackles in this book - but there are just as many goofy moments and joking and laughs about Robinson's life and her experiences. Sometimes it can even fill you with joy. The section about her meeting her idol Bono was just the cutest thing I've ever read. So cute. She was so happy, and seeing her magical dreams come true in the most loving way possible was just so adorable and life-affirming. :D Very sweet. And she loves her parents, talks about them a lot. She has close girlfriends, watches too much tv, and always thinks whoever she's dating is The One she is going to get married to. She's very funny. It's a fun, cute book - which also educates you about the still-present desperate need for change in the way we treat others. TL;DR Even better than You Can't Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have to Explain in my opinion. Robinson kills it in this book. She's funny, she's whip-smart, she's making you laugh but she's also making you think. If you are put off by her writing style, please just give it til page 50. If she doesn't grab you by then, give up. But give her a fair chance to get her hooks into you. She might surprise you - in a good way. I personally found the book both hilarious and enlightening, and I'm a pretty harsh judge of books - as you probably know by now. I'll end with Robinson's thoughts on harassment, which I thought were on-point: "What's the situation?" he asked. I assumed he was asking about the party and he corrected me: "No, what's the situation... down there?" "Excuse me?" He looked down at my crotch and raised his eyebrows. I was pissed off, but I didn't want to cause a scene, so I simply told him what he was doing was disgusting and to knock it off. "Oh, come on," he started. "It's not like we're colleagues or anything." Oh, hell no! Because I was a newbie comic and not on the same level as him professionally, it was totally fine in his eyes to sexually harass me. Screw that! You should respect me whether this is my first day in stand-up or I'm a legend like Wanda Sykes. I stood my ground, he backed off, and I never talked to him again, and thanks to us being at different stages of our careers, we were never really on the same shows much after that. Until a few years later, when I arrived early to a gig and saw that Richard was also on the lineup. Seeing his name caused that uncomfortable moment to come rushing back to me. FUCK. I tried to keep my cool. All the comics on the show eventually trickled in one by one and were greeting each other with hugs. Then he appeared. I didn't know what to do, as I was sure he didn't remember what he said to me all those years ago. So I did what a lot of women are conditioned to do: I thought about the situation from every possible angle, considered what his feelings might be if I acted a certain way, and then decided his comfort was more important than mine. I hugged him and said it was good to see him. It wasn't. It sucked, but I didn't want to make HIM feel weird if everyone hugged him except me, so I "took one for the team." I know, I know, but in that moment, I couldn't overpower what society had conditioned in me. I hugged him even though I didn't want to touch him, let alone be in the same room as him. His presence reminded me of when I was new on the scene and male comics would test the waters to see if they could disrespect, harass, or intimidate me. I felt small again. And that's the thing people forget about harassment's real power. Harassment is not designed to be temporary; it's intended to stay with you, keep you in line, never allow you to fully relax and be calm. That way the perpetrator doesn't even have to do the work of oppressing you. You'll inadvertently do the work for him long after he's forgotten what he's done. So that instead of remembering how you stood up for yourself and using that memory as strength to propel yourself forward, you'll be taken back to when you felt weak. Harassment is not just about harming you that one time; it's about lingering around for every time afterwards and chipping away at you without you realizing it. 117

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I mean, there was no way I wasn't going to read this. Even if Phoebe Robinson of YOU CAN'T TOUCH MY HAIR fame hadn't wrote it, I would have picked it up anyway because it has 'trash' in the title. What kind of Trash Queen would I be if I didn't read a book that professes the solemn doctrine I hold so dear: that everything is garbage, and it's up to you to embrace the dumpster life because #traaaay (as in, trashy-slay). OF COURSE. EVERYTHING' Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I mean, there was no way I wasn't going to read this. Even if Phoebe Robinson of YOU CAN'T TOUCH MY HAIR fame hadn't wrote it, I would have picked it up anyway because it has 'trash' in the title. What kind of Trash Queen would I be if I didn't read a book that professes the solemn doctrine I hold so dear: that everything is garbage, and it's up to you to embrace the dumpster life because #traaaay (as in, trashy-slay). OF COURSE. EVERYTHING'S TRASH is a much different book from YOU CAN'T TOUCH MY HAIR. I feel like YOU CAN'T TOUCH was a series of dialogues about what it means to be a black woman that unpacked a lot of the things that make up the identity, the heritage, and the current joys and problems that are associated with being black. EVERYTHING'S TRASH, on the other hand, adopts a broader focus while also refusing to bow down to white feminism or stray away from things that people might find uncomfortable or unsavory (e.g. white people can be trash). I enjoyed this book a lot. Her sense of humor actually reminds me a lot of Tiffany Haddish's in her memoir, THE LAST BLACK UNICORN, but I feel like Robinson has a better idea of where the line is and knows when to stop. (Haddish, on the other hand, well. If we've read her book, we're familiar with the Roscoe chapter and we know how ~cringe~ it is.) I loved how she made up funny words and phrases that actually made a lot of sense in context, and I loved the topics she wrote on, which covered everything from sizeism to toxic masculinity to black lives matter to white feminism (and the problems associated with that) to sexism to racism. There was a lot, and I feel like her ideas are going to make a lot of people angry (ha). I obviously was not, because I agreed with mostly everything she said, even (maybe especially?) about what she said about white people closing their eyes and covering their ears and going lalalalala every time someone tries to bring up race. It is uncomfortable to talk about, but that's all the more reason we should have these conversations. Talking about race is not inherently racist and saying that you don't see color is just as problematic as focusing on it too much. These are simple truths, and yet so many people can't be bothered to hear them. She has similar refrains when it comes to sexism and philosophy, as well. Her brief mention of what it means to be agnostic and mortality salience particularly struck me because it was a little too r e a l. I wasn't really prepared for how comparatively dark this book would feel while juxtaposed against the first, but once I got used to it, I was like, "Okay, yeah." EVERYTHING'S TRASH, BUT IT'S OKAY is a very different book from YOU CAN'T TOUCH MY HAIR, but still manages to keep the same tone that made me appreciate the first so much. Honestly, I wish we made bigots take "good person" classes the way people who suck at driving have to take driver's ed, because this is one of the books I'd hand them to read as one of their assignments. Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy! 4 to 4.5 stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eilonwy

    First thing I've got to say is, my review will be pathetic. So go read Carmen's brilliant review which got me to immediately put a hold on this. I've heard of the 2 Dope Queens podcast, but never listened to it. (I may have to rectify that.) So I had to look Phoebe Robinson up when I saw Carmen's glowing review. Phoebe turns out to be from the same corner of Ohio as me, one county over, which extra sealed my having to read this book. And I'm really glad I did. It covers a range of topics: Weight First thing I've got to say is, my review will be pathetic. So go read Carmen's brilliant review which got me to immediately put a hold on this. I've heard of the 2 Dope Queens podcast, but never listened to it. (I may have to rectify that.) So I had to look Phoebe Robinson up when I saw Carmen's glowing review. Phoebe turns out to be from the same corner of Ohio as me, one county over, which extra sealed my having to read this book. And I'm really glad I did. It covers a range of topics: Weight/clothing size/body image and how much energy women waste on thinking about this crap; feminism and its uneven relationship with women of color; "all the ways being a woman is ridic"; interracial dating; how to recognize non-trash moments of one's life and feel good about them; Bono; money; workaholism; being single; and (view spoiler)[not being single any more (hide spoiler)] . All of them are covered with a combination of very strong opinions and deeply personal experiences, conveyed with so much humor that I was laughing and snorting out loud on nearly every page even while often wanting to fume and cry at the same time. (This is similar to my reaction to Lindy West's Shrill; doing stand-up comedy has given both these women an ability to be simultaneously cutting and funny that I deeply envy.) All of her writing is sprinkled with pop culture references and little asides that just added to the depth and hilarity. (Trust me -- there's probably a reference in here for everyone, no matter your age, gender, or background.) The first four chapters were the hardest-hitting for me. These are such powerful issues, and they never seem to get resolved or go away. (1) All women, of all sizes and ethnic backgrounds, suffer from constant judgement of our bodies, by other people, and also by ourselves. It's a constant drumbeat no matter what else is going on in our lives, and it sucks. (2) Feminism is important and has helped millions of women, but it still manages to fail entire communities by often being too narrowly focused on middle class and up, mostly white women (and straight women, and cis women to the detriment of transwomen). Phoebe makes terrific points about intersectionality, and standing up for ALL women. (3) Being a woman is totally ridic, and it's nice to be made to laugh about some of the absurdity in such a friendly, "oh-gosh-yes-me-TOO!" way. (And any men reading this -- you should absolutely read this chapter.) And (4) It is also totally ridiculous how fraught interracial dating remains in freaking 2019. I could have lived without all the Bono fangirling; it was cute, but yawn for me. The chapters on money and workaholism felt a little too self-help-y and simplistic to me (Phoebe admits to a penchant for self-help books, and you can tell from these chapters that she's read a number of them. This just wasn't what I was reading this book for after those powerful first few chapters). But these chapters are still worth reading, and not worth knocking a star off for. There is a well-deserved waiting list for this at my library. Phoebe is just brilliant. I'm going to read her first book now, and then tap my fingers impatiently until she comes out with another one. Now seriously, if you haven't already read Carmen's review, go back to the top of mine, click the link, and do it!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Didi

    Really good read. Check out my review video by clicking the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Unrfq...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    4.5 Stars. This lives up to hype. Phoebe Robinson delivered the fun, humorous, enlightening essays that I was expecting. I think her talent as a writer has grown more solid and mature. I honestly found myself enjoying this collection of essays more than her previous book, which I enjoyed quite a bit. I have been wanting to read this for months, ever since I saw the cover uploaded to Goodreads, and am very happy to have been granted an ARC from the publisher. A part of me is disappointed that I 4.5 Stars. This lives up to hype. Phoebe Robinson delivered the fun, humorous, enlightening essays that I was expecting. I think her talent as a writer has grown more solid and mature. I honestly found myself enjoying this collection of essays more than her previous book, which I enjoyed quite a bit. I have been wanting to read this for months, ever since I saw the cover uploaded to Goodreads, and am very happy to have been granted an ARC from the publisher. A part of me is disappointed that I didn’t get to listen to the author read the audiobook. While her stream of consciousness jokes and witty observations are entertaining, sometimes she went into all out Virginia Woolf mode. I think Robinson’s writing flows best while being spoken aloud. I’m still going to check the audiobook out from the library. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a free copy of this ebook in exchange for an unbiased review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    Everything's Trash, But It's Okay really delivered on so many levels. Phoebe isn't afraid to go there and talk about the really trivial things to the downright TRASH! I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, I found myself laughing out loud, getting enraged, nodding my head in agreement, crying (yes- I cried) and screaming "Hellz Nah!". I went through a rage of emotions while reading this book and even though a lot of things are trash, Phoebe really made me feel like its okay. I didn't expect t Everything's Trash, But It's Okay really delivered on so many levels. Phoebe isn't afraid to go there and talk about the really trivial things to the downright TRASH! I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, I found myself laughing out loud, getting enraged, nodding my head in agreement, crying (yes- I cried) and screaming "Hellz Nah!". I went through a rage of emotions while reading this book and even though a lot of things are trash, Phoebe really made me feel like its okay. I didn't expect to enjoy this book as much as I did, but it is clear her writing got better with her second book. The book is so topical and timely. A lot of the things she wrote about you've probably read about but she writes about it from an entirely refreshing angle. The book covers dating, feminism, finance, Phoebe meeting Bono and #BritishBae . The entire time I was reading this book I could hear Phoebe in my head which speaks to how authentic the writing is. Everything Is Trash, but this book isn't! I definitely recommend picking this one up. Thanks DuttonBooks!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    This gif will make sense in a second, okay? It is relly rell (relevant). I wanted so badly to love this as much as I loved Robinson's debut! However, I am An Old, because a book that is rife with Robinson's signature stand-up style of phrases like "sosh meeds" written as such instead of social media, I just cannot hang. This book would, I imagine, be HILARIOUS as an audiobook read by the author, or as a standup monologue, but my brain is too tired by the end of the night to parse out Robinson's u This gif will make sense in a second, okay? It is relly rell (relevant). I wanted so badly to love this as much as I loved Robinson's debut! However, I am An Old, because a book that is rife with Robinson's signature stand-up style of phrases like "sosh meeds" written as such instead of social media, I just cannot hang. This book would, I imagine, be HILARIOUS as an audiobook read by the author, or as a standup monologue, but my brain is too tired by the end of the night to parse out Robinson's unique way of phrasing things. It's like.....imagine the character Tom Haverford wrote a novel, full of chicky-chicky-parm-parm (chicken parmesan) or bean blankies (tortillas) etc but then also spelled them been blankees, just to be funny/difficult to read when you are An Old. Except it turns out I'm two years younger than Robinson. Anyway. I love Phoebe's podcast with Jessica Williams! I did not want to give this 2 stars! But I also skimmed SO MUCH because I just.couldn't.deal. [image error] I also wish Robinson had more time for this book -- it felt like a lot of it was "I am bad at money lol!" and "U2!" and it lacked the depth that I thought her debut contained. But much like when I have a blog post deadline and I need to make some writing money, sometimes you have to churn your brain butter with the material you have available. TL;DR treat yoself to her first book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stella

    I read this entire book with Phoebe Robinson's voice in my head. From her deep dive into her trouble with feminism (I feel you, girl) to her deep and abiding love for Bono, Phoebe is hilarious, insightful, talented and real. She's a real person with real feeling about real things. She's not afraid to be honest. This book is much needed in this current climate. Also, Phoebe - Let's be friends because of many reasons, but mainly because "Ugh, but lol" is the perfect epitaph for my future gravestone I read this entire book with Phoebe Robinson's voice in my head. From her deep dive into her trouble with feminism (I feel you, girl) to her deep and abiding love for Bono, Phoebe is hilarious, insightful, talented and real. She's a real person with real feeling about real things. She's not afraid to be honest. This book is much needed in this current climate. Also, Phoebe - Let's be friends because of many reasons, but mainly because "Ugh, but lol" is the perfect epitaph for my future gravestone as well. Thanks to NetGalley, the publisher and the Queen Phoebe Robinson for the ARC.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chinook

    This is solidly interesting because Phoebe is funny andnshe does a good audiobook reading. But I didn’t love it as much as her first book, except maybe the addendum, which is super sweet and adorable as she talks about how she met her bae and he chimes in as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I so adored her first book, but I can’t recommend this one. Bummed because I enjoy her podcasts and body of work and preordered this book anticipating a fun, insightful read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    lit.erary.britt

    I have to admit I’ve never listened to “2 Dope Queens” (only because I don’t listen any podcasts), but I enjoyed Robinson’s first book You Can’t Touch My Hair, so I snatched this one up on pub day. I admire a smart, strong, funny woman who isn’t afraid to share personal stories, but will also broach important societal issues. This essay collection is a good mix. Robinson’s boisterous personality and comical narration is an entertaining audio experience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    So much better than her first book. Yo I closed Everything Is Trash, laughed, whooped and high-fived the air like she was in the room with me!!! Phoebe Robinson is funny. Bruh, if you had asked me if I thought she was funny when I read her first book.. you would have gotten all my side-eye.. you can read my review for the first book on here.. but real talks - I have a change of heart! She has definitely upped her game with Everything Is Trash! The truth just poured out of her and it was like sw So much better than her first book. Yo I closed Everything Is Trash, laughed, whooped and high-fived the air like she was in the room with me!!! Phoebe Robinson is funny. Bruh, if you had asked me if I thought she was funny when I read her first book.. you would have gotten all my side-eye.. you can read my review for the first book on here.. but real talks - I have a change of heart! She has definitely upped her game with Everything Is Trash! The truth just poured out of her and it was like swimming through truth-bomb after truth-bomb sans any cheese. I love the real-world/real-girl struggling to make it story. It’s the same in every career where you’re putting yourself out there to make a name for yourself but it’s hit with stops and starts. I love all her political commentary even tho it’s relatively stuck to one essay which I also appreciated. I love how she spoke of the complexities black women faced joining the women’s march — it’s something that I definitely went through at the time it occurred. I love how much she rode for sisters in this book. Her obsession with Bono is hilarious, her new beau and all the tea she spilled about loneliness and money really impressed the fuck out of me. Just her ability to be candid was so inspiring. I think this she redeemed herself in Everything Is Trash and she solidified herself as a certified comedy-memoir writer. I’ll read all of them, keep writing Pheebs!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    3.5 STARS

  15. 4 out of 5

    Georgette

    Hilarious. Perfect thing to read with the holidays on our heels. Holidays in retail are not great fun but reading this helps!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Loved the chapter on feminisms, but otherwise only okay. The first book was much better.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I really feel like Everything's Trash, But it's Okay by Phoebe Robinson just was not for me. And I really can't tell whether the book is very good because I just couldn't get past Robinosn's writing style. I've read a few reviews that suggest listening to the audiobook is better, but when it comes to the book I found that I just couldn't stand Robinson's constant asides, derailing her commentary into a long tangent about nothing in particular and nothing of import. Ironically, the introduction to I really feel like Everything's Trash, But it's Okay by Phoebe Robinson just was not for me. And I really can't tell whether the book is very good because I just couldn't get past Robinosn's writing style. I've read a few reviews that suggest listening to the audiobook is better, but when it comes to the book I found that I just couldn't stand Robinson's constant asides, derailing her commentary into a long tangent about nothing in particular and nothing of import. Ironically, the introduction to her work should have been warning enough for me that I wasn't going to like this book because it mentioned all her strange renditions of words and phrases, basically foreshadowing for the reader the ginormous mess that they would soon find themselves rifling through. I feel like a lot of Robinson's points are lost among her commentary, missing among jokes that really weren't that funny and a dense level of conversational tone that just didn't make me feel involved in the book. Robinson's regular trailing from the point and personal unique way of writing, with the asides and the modified words were just too much for me at the end of the day and I really couldn't get past it. While I always appreciate a commentary about important topics such as these, I was far too annoyed with the writing style the entire time I was reading to really appreciate much of it. I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. | Twitter | Reader Fox Blog | Instagram |

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    My favorite thing about Phoebe Robinson's writing is that I can't read it without hearing her voice in my head. After listening her friendly and hilarious voice on her 2 Dope Queens and Soooo Many White Guys podcasts for the last few years, this compilations of essays (along with her first book released in 2016) are the perfect extension of her craft. If you're already a fan of Phoebe's, this book is positive, real, and hilarious must read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    More than a few laugh out loud moments in here. And more than a few #YQY moments.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    Audiobook read by Phoebe was gold. I've started abrev-ing, and using millenial phrases like "my bae" and "cuz I'm basic". She makes me so happy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Mester

    Definitely get the audio, her asides are often even funnier than the book and #BritishBaekoff co-narrates the addendum with her. As before her essays are uneven but the overall experience is enjoyable

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark Ballinger

    The essays are good. Her story of a financial hole and how she got there is pretty important. But, so often the message is buried in irritating fake hashtags, fake urls, and strained cultural references. Take this example, where she's writing about feminism and intersectionality: "part of the reason these growing pains aren't entirely apparent to all feminists is because they're hidden underneath feel-good decorations the way I'd cover a wine stain on a couch cushion by using my Nicki Minaj 'Mil The essays are good. Her story of a financial hole and how she got there is pretty important. But, so often the message is buried in irritating fake hashtags, fake urls, and strained cultural references. Take this example, where she's writing about feminism and intersectionality: "part of the reason these growing pains aren't entirely apparent to all feminists is because they're hidden underneath feel-good decorations the way I'd cover a wine stain on a couch cushion by using my Nicki Minaj 'Miley, what's good?' throw pillow."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    A funny, thoughtful, and sharp collection of essays on (if occasionally a little prone to tangents or overextended metaphors) that deftly tackle topics from body image to modern dating to feminism, ideal for dipping in and out of on a trip or with a mug of tea and some excellent snacks.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ofilia

    This book made me laugh out loud twice while on a plane in the middle seat. I'm pretty sure the two people on either side of me thought I was nuts. Robinson uses her trademark voice and humor to discuss various issues of the day from politics, to dating to money. Part memoir, part self-help book, Robinson assures her readers that at the end of the day we are going to be ok and that's always nice to hear.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Started off 💯 ended ho hum but I think that is to do with how I have a icy heart and don’t want to read about people finding love through cute meets. She’s still a queen and I want two dope queens to podcast forever.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Libby Chennell

    I laughed out loud, I questioned my previous beliefs about feminism and my role as a white woman in it (had to pause the audio to take notes and reflect on my instant, uncensored reactions to what she had to say- and wow, the result was not what I wanted it to be- so had to listen a second time to the feminism chapter to really ensure it was sinking in). I applaud Phoebe for producing one thing that makes me laugh so hard and think deeply at the same time. I still my not agree with her 100% on e I laughed out loud, I questioned my previous beliefs about feminism and my role as a white woman in it (had to pause the audio to take notes and reflect on my instant, uncensored reactions to what she had to say- and wow, the result was not what I wanted it to be- so had to listen a second time to the feminism chapter to really ensure it was sinking in). I applaud Phoebe for producing one thing that makes me laugh so hard and think deeply at the same time. I still my not agree with her 100% on everything (Bono is not sexy and Raphael Nadal is not a “person of color”- he white), but I really loved this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Aldridge

    Essays and books by women who are comedians will always be my favorite guilty pleasure reads (so not that guilt after all). I can’t tell you how many times I found myself cackling on the bus & metro while reading this, and how “one more chapter” kept turning into two and three more chapters, despite being exhausted from work. Robinson has such a fun and unique voice, and is able to describe her experiences with body imagine, sexism, dating, and meeting U2 (jealous, I know) in ways that are r Essays and books by women who are comedians will always be my favorite guilty pleasure reads (so not that guilt after all). I can’t tell you how many times I found myself cackling on the bus & metro while reading this, and how “one more chapter” kept turning into two and three more chapters, despite being exhausted from work. Robinson has such a fun and unique voice, and is able to describe her experiences with body imagine, sexism, dating, and meeting U2 (jealous, I know) in ways that are relatable, informational, and touching all while being hilarious. She talks about serious issues and in a serious time, but it’s so, so fun, and I never wanted this book to end. She’s really hit her stride and I’m so excited to keep reading all her books & listening to her podcasts.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This is literally the worst "book" I have ever "read"; "book" meaning "is it really a book if it's so incomprehensible that it might actually be making me illiterate in my attempt to read it?" and "read" meaning I tried on three separate occasions to get through it and the furthest I ever made was around page 18. If I could get a refund, and damages for lost time and brain cells spent on this mess, I would.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hilary Land

    Hey Booboos! This was a very funny audio book and I snorted on the subway a few too many times. As Ilana Glazer writes in the foreward, Phoebe's relationship with language is extraordinary. I got lost in a few tangents but it was worth it for the "lol.coms" I found this book had a great deal of depth, particularly in her chapter on feminism and Im still a big fan of the Phoebs. I'm glad she is seeing success and that she is continuing to make us laugh (and think).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shoshana Frank

    Phoebe Robinson’s hilarious new sophomore book is stand-up comedy at its best. Robinson’s self-narration is an outstanding element of the story; she brings such energy to the words. Filled with pop culture references, acronyms, and hashtags, Robinson’s fast-paced essays on American society is an antidote to modern woes; especially for a generation that is struggling with extreme disappointments and alarming changes at an ever increasing rate. Robinson attacks preconceived notions about race, fem Phoebe Robinson’s hilarious new sophomore book is stand-up comedy at its best. Robinson’s self-narration is an outstanding element of the story; she brings such energy to the words. Filled with pop culture references, acronyms, and hashtags, Robinson’s fast-paced essays on American society is an antidote to modern woes; especially for a generation that is struggling with extreme disappointments and alarming changes at an ever increasing rate. Robinson attacks preconceived notions about race, feminism, politics, weight, and dating in the technological age with humor and honesty. Robinson’s career in spoken word, shines in this candid story that is meant to be heard. Readers will laugh, cry, and rally with Robinson’s personal anecdotes and real-life examples. While everything IS trash Robinson leaves readers with hope filled action steps and ways to make a positive impact on the world. This is perfect for fans of podcasts and late-night show personalities. I LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.