kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Incomplete Book of Running

Availability: Ready to download

Peter Sagal, the host of NPR’s beloved show Wait Wait..Don’t Tell Me and a popular columnist for Runner’s World, shares his insightful and entertaining look at life and running that explores the transformative power of the sport.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Peter Sagal, the host of NPR’s beloved show Wait Wait..Don’t Tell Me and a popular columnist for Runner’s World, shares his insightful and entertaining look at life and running that explores the transformative power of the sport.

30 review for The Incomplete Book of Running

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    4 stars for the running parts. 2 stars for the frankly off-putting way Sagal writes about his ex-wife and daughters, as well as pretty much all other women (except for his current wife - she seemed like an actual human being). I get that he was also processing his divorce and the aftermath, I just found it really weird. Averaging out = 3 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Van Reese

    As a long time runner, I was very pleased to win this book in a give away (thank you Simon & Shuster). The only negative, I felt, was that he talks about his divorce; a lot. It was painful, so O.K. We will let it go. Most of the book was, surprise, actually about running. I felt that I could relate well with his running experiences, and found we had much in common. My dad also ran and kind of influenced me getting started running (though I never made fun of him); I also asked for real runnin As a long time runner, I was very pleased to win this book in a give away (thank you Simon & Shuster). The only negative, I felt, was that he talks about his divorce; a lot. It was painful, so O.K. We will let it go. Most of the book was, surprise, actually about running. I felt that I could relate well with his running experiences, and found we had much in common. My dad also ran and kind of influenced me getting started running (though I never made fun of him); I also asked for real running shoes (and got them); I also ran marathons (though not as many as Pete, and not Boston...yet). One of my favorite parts was at the end when he talks about the difference between running as a lifestyle and "jogging" for exercise. I quote part of it, "Joggers wait to finish; we runners expect to get somewhere." People will sometimes ask me, "Are you still jogging?" (Jogging? As if!) Like maybe I have finally put that phase behind me. I usually just say, "Yes, I still run almost every day. The other thing is how they are amazed that I run in the winter. Actually, there might be some legitimate craziness there, but yes, I still run even when it is dark and single digits; because I am a runner. I felt that Peter expresses that sentiment quite well in this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I love the saying he recounted: if you can't play sports, run. If you can't run, run long. I can relate. I'm a fan of Wait Wait and thought this book was entertaining. Peter Sagal talks about his running history, his meshugas about his weight, and his midlife crisis leading to more running and eventual divorce. Spoiler alert, a man got remarried quickly after a divorce. What else is new? I did feel for him. He talks about his depression, how he felt he failed as a husband and a father. He also ca I love the saying he recounted: if you can't play sports, run. If you can't run, run long. I can relate. I'm a fan of Wait Wait and thought this book was entertaining. Peter Sagal talks about his running history, his meshugas about his weight, and his midlife crisis leading to more running and eventual divorce. Spoiler alert, a man got remarried quickly after a divorce. What else is new? I did feel for him. He talks about his depression, how he felt he failed as a husband and a father. He also can seem a little slimy and self important sometimes. Sorry.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Doug Gordon

    I'm a runner and also a fan of "Wait, Wait", so I really expected to enjoy this book a lot, but would find it hard to recommend to either a runner or non-runner. Mainly, I thought it would be mostly about running with a lot of humorous anecdotes, but instead it was more of a personal memoir that delved a bit too far into the author's personal life and problems, which he dwelt on a bit too much in my opinion. The book also had the feel of being a bit rushed to print and could have used a bit more I'm a runner and also a fan of "Wait, Wait", so I really expected to enjoy this book a lot, but would find it hard to recommend to either a runner or non-runner. Mainly, I thought it would be mostly about running with a lot of humorous anecdotes, but instead it was more of a personal memoir that delved a bit too far into the author's personal life and problems, which he dwelt on a bit too much in my opinion. The book also had the feel of being a bit rushed to print and could have used a bit more editing to smooth out the flow from chapter to chapter. Maybe it would be useful to someone thinking of taking up the sport of running, but the useable information was scattered too thinly to be very helpful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ron S

    A mid-life memoir you needn't be a runner to enjoy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Vulnerable and made me want to run marathons. Should prob have a trigger warning about dieting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Funny, wry and charming! I love Peter Sagal, not only from Wait, Wait but also his GoT recaps with Nerdette. I’m also glad to know that he is someone who can laugh at himself while singing along to a jingle stating that he’s the worst. 😂 I often have a hard time relating to running books because my experience is not that of a 3:05 marathon. But Sagal recognizes that and after all, this is *his experience. But there is a line (that I’m badly paraphrasing) which says that the only proper response t Funny, wry and charming! I love Peter Sagal, not only from Wait, Wait but also his GoT recaps with Nerdette. I’m also glad to know that he is someone who can laugh at himself while singing along to a jingle stating that he’s the worst. 😂 I often have a hard time relating to running books because my experience is not that of a 3:05 marathon. But Sagal recognizes that and after all, this is *his experience. But there is a line (that I’m badly paraphrasing) which says that the only proper response to someone’s race results, no matter how slow, is thrilled congratulations. And i really appreciate that!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jan Van Bruaene

    I didn't know what to expect about this book. I only know about Peter Sagal from NPR Wait Wait Don't Tell me Show. And I heard he co-wrote the less than stellar movie Dirty Dancing Havana Nights. He wrote a book about running? What does Peter Sagal know about running? It turns out he knows quite a bit about it, and has a great number high paced races to show for it. I expected a funny and witty book. It is not. It is an honest and often raw story about the running part of his life. I could not p I didn't know what to expect about this book. I only know about Peter Sagal from NPR Wait Wait Don't Tell me Show. And I heard he co-wrote the less than stellar movie Dirty Dancing Havana Nights. He wrote a book about running? What does Peter Sagal know about running? It turns out he knows quite a bit about it, and has a great number high paced races to show for it. I expected a funny and witty book. It is not. It is an honest and often raw story about the running part of his life. I could not put this book down. And once I finished it, the only natural thing to do was to end it with in true radio tradition of Paul Harvey: "And now you know the rest of the story".

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jacques Bezuidenhout

    Picked up this book based on it being a running book. Not knowing the author or his shows. Yes most of the book is centred around running, but it ended up being more of a personal / mid-life memoir of Peter. It is plainly put about Life. And Life happens. Each of us have our own things that happen during life, and we cope in certain ways. This book is not about someone constantly succeeding, actually it is with about someone mostly struggling in situations, and dealing with it. I did like the runni Picked up this book based on it being a running book. Not knowing the author or his shows. Yes most of the book is centred around running, but it ended up being more of a personal / mid-life memoir of Peter. It is plainly put about Life. And Life happens. Each of us have our own things that happen during life, and we cope in certain ways. This book is not about someone constantly succeeding, actually it is with about someone mostly struggling in situations, and dealing with it. I did like the running aspects. And there was a lot I can relate to. He puts things bluntly, and hits the nail on the head. You'd probably need to be into both running an memoirs to actually enjoy this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jamey Bradbury

    Peter Sagal's slim memoir about running through the turmoil of his own life and the turmoil of the world at large is entertaining and perfectly captures the radio host's voice and sensibility. I was surprised at how candid he was about the bitterness of his divorce, but it was kind of refreshing. As an amateur runner, he still has great advice to offer other amateurs or wannabes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nate Hawthorne

    Not a how to book, but I learned a lot anyway. I have read some of his articles in Runner's World and also listened to him on Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me. He has a comfortable, casual way of writing that is completely accessible. There are some good stories and motivational quotes. It is a quick read and worth every moment.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allison Sauntry

    Funny memoir that I’d recommend to any runner (especially if you are a Wait Wait fan!) It’s a really fast read — I started and finished it over Christmas Eve/Day, even with a good bit of that time consumed with family parties! As someone who is running the 2019 Boston Marathon, I also enjoyed reading about his Boston experiences.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Grant Den Herder

    Loved this book! I went into this one thinking it would be a humorous take on running; instead, Peter Sagal takes us through all of the highs and lows of life and how running has made an impact through it all. Emotional and hilarious. This book makes me want to be a more mindful person, not just a more mindful runner. I would highly recommend!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Platt

    Highly recommended. Great book on running and life in general.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I want to be Peter Sagal’s running buddy. A funny, poignant meditation on aging, exercise and love. Loved it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lenny

    Absolutely brilliant. Have a whole new respect for this man and a whole new respect for runners, even myself.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Savil Srivastava

    A fun, quick meditation on running and life. If you can, get the audiobook. Peter Sagal works in radio and has a hilarious radio voice!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Beth Jusino

    So... I wanted to like this book. I wanted it to make me want to run again. It didn't. (Sorry, Peter Sagal. I really like your radio show and wanted to like this book.) Sagal bookends his work with great stories about the Boston Marathon, both on the day of the terrorist bombing and the following year. They're about the relationships among runners, and between runners and their bodies, and between human beings and competition. And those are great. But the middle...is about being middle aged. Ther So... I wanted to like this book. I wanted it to make me want to run again. It didn't. (Sorry, Peter Sagal. I really like your radio show and wanted to like this book.) Sagal bookends his work with great stories about the Boston Marathon, both on the day of the terrorist bombing and the following year. They're about the relationships among runners, and between runners and their bodies, and between human beings and competition. And those are great. But the middle...is about being middle aged. There's a lot about being divorced. And a lot about stats and numbers and what a great runner Sagal disciplined himself to be. And then it repeats. In the end, The Incomplete Book of Running didn't drive me off my couch. It didn't make me laugh. It didn't make me feel all that good about middle age. But it did help me know that Peter Sagal is a really, really good amateur runner. Was that the goal?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Got to hear Sagal give a book talk at Sixth and I about this book and it was lovely. This is a nice, short book about how running has changed his life for the better. Also nice shout out to my buddy Bobby Gill who started Cupid’s Undie Run! I think I introduced the two on twitter when I saw Sagal tweet that he was running the race!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Auntjenny

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really like memoirs about running. I’ve read three others that I can recall, and this one is now my favorite. Though as I read I wasn’t sure it would be, because I wasn’t sure I really liked Peter Sagal. My first criticism is that Sagal sort of comes off as pitying the blind runners he guides for. My mom is blind, so I have some experience with this (experience with blind people and, specifically, experience with blind people who don’t like to be pitied). For example, when talking to a girl at I really like memoirs about running. I’ve read three others that I can recall, and this one is now my favorite. Though as I read I wasn’t sure it would be, because I wasn’t sure I really liked Peter Sagal. My first criticism is that Sagal sort of comes off as pitying the blind runners he guides for. My mom is blind, so I have some experience with this (experience with blind people and, specifically, experience with blind people who don’t like to be pitied). For example, when talking to a girl at a blind school Sagal says, “it occurred to me that my trials and my successes were all pissant little annoyances compared to what she endured every day as she woke to darkness.” Well, hm. I have a really radical perspective on this matter, and here it is: we all have trials. Every last one of us. Some of us can’t see, and some of us are wound-up, self-critical runners with depression going through a divorce, but we all have trials. To posit that people who can’t see have worse trials than the rest of us is a way of “othering” them. And pitying them. And it’s a little icky. I will say, I think Sagal makes up for these transgressions at the end of the book, which was really quite moving. Sagal tells the story of a man with retinitis pigmentosa who just kept changing sports as his disease progressed. Sagal talks about how limitations are not roadblocks; they are fences we can all cross. This is also the same section where Sagal talks about his own depression (itself a disability!) and it becomes apparent just how awful his divorce really was: it sounds like his relationship with his daughters is maybe nonexistent at this point. I enjoyed his perspective about why people become runners too. I can relate to a lot of what he describes. I think maybe some of us runners are a bit keyed up. We’re a wee bit anxious. We’ve got a lot of energy and like dogs, we become destructive when we don’t get our exercise. Maybe by running we’re refusing to give in to sedentary modern life and becoming the people we were born to be. P.S. No surprise: Sagal is also quite funny.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I'm not a runner nor do I aspire to be one, but I still found plenty of inspiration in this book. Mostly I'm a fan of Peter and Wait Wait! Don't Tell Me! but I've also gotten to know a little bit about Peter's off-radio life through Twitter, his prior book (The Book of Vice: Very Naughty Things), and some of his columns for Runner's World. He's a smart guy, we have some people in common, and I enjoy absorbing his writing. This book was more interesting and engaging than The Book of Vice. It was m I'm not a runner nor do I aspire to be one, but I still found plenty of inspiration in this book. Mostly I'm a fan of Peter and Wait Wait! Don't Tell Me! but I've also gotten to know a little bit about Peter's off-radio life through Twitter, his prior book (The Book of Vice: Very Naughty Things), and some of his columns for Runner's World. He's a smart guy, we have some people in common, and I enjoy absorbing his writing. This book was more interesting and engaging than The Book of Vice. It was more personal and emotional, although there was still some expository sprinkled throughout that clued non-runners such as myself in on things that we'd otherwise be in the dark about. Peter's topic is a subject he's clearly passionate about, but through the book he relates explosive tales (and I'm not just talking about his poops!), gives the reader some big-picture thoughts about running, discusses his personal journey, and more. I guess it's his personal journey and the particularly explosive Boston Marathon that really got me. Obviously being that close to the Boston Marathon bombing is inherently emotional, but there are bits sprinkled throughout about his divorce and how that reshaped him as a person that really spoke to me. I too have been hard at work doing my physical activity of choice (different than his) using the time alone to process, emote, and retort through inner monologue. The book was so engaging to me, in fact, that I got through 90% in less than a day! It would have been the whole thing in a day, but I finished another book in the morning and also had chores that needed doing. :) Pro tip: If you're not familiar with Jim Fixx's Complete Book of Running, I highly encourage you to have a close look at the cover design at some point while you're reading Peter's book. Since I wasn't familiar, I was highly amused.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    [Audiobook Review] Why wouldn't I listen to Peter Sagal's lovely voice narrate this humorous yet emotionally poignant book?! A big recommendation to everyone considering the audiobook - it is, in my opinion, the best way to experience Sagal's radio announcer persona, voice, and comedy. Truth be told, I had no idea what to expect from this memoir. Sagal is a well known comedian from NPR and one I've been listening to for over a decade. I expected more comedy than drama. However, I was pleasantly [Audiobook Review] Why wouldn't I listen to Peter Sagal's lovely voice narrate this humorous yet emotionally poignant book?! A big recommendation to everyone considering the audiobook - it is, in my opinion, the best way to experience Sagal's radio announcer persona, voice, and comedy. Truth be told, I had no idea what to expect from this memoir. Sagal is a well known comedian from NPR and one I've been listening to for over a decade. I expected more comedy than drama. However, I was pleasantly surprised with the depth he presented. He readily depicts less than flattering portraits and of himself. For example, in one chapter he delves into a overweight runner's journey to run the Boston Marathon. At first, Sagal unabashedly states that he thought the guy was a total idiot and glory hound; but, with the due diligence of a journalist, comes to sincerely appreciate and respect his journey. It's his honest voice that makes the book SO refreshing. While he is at times, self-deprecating, he doesn't employ it as a comedy trope. Sagal admits his flaws in running, life, and his first marriage. He doesn't shy away from the ways in which he's acted poorly, made bad decisions, and been completely human. As he explains, we are hardest on ourselves. This book has inspired me in life and my athletic pursuits to be a little easier on myself and find joy in the ride.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Connolly

    In 2013 when the Boston Marathon bombs went off NPR news show host Peter Sagal (Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, which I loathe) just finished the race and was 100 yards from the explosions. The terrorist strike serves as the loose epicenter of Sagal’s The Incomplete Guide to Running, a mildly entertaining book. The title riffs off of Jim Fixx’s running phenom book The Complete Guide to Running which helped usher in America’s love affair with running in the 1980s. Sagan’s book is not a running guide; In 2013 when the Boston Marathon bombs went off NPR news show host Peter Sagal (Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me, which I loathe) just finished the race and was 100 yards from the explosions. The terrorist strike serves as the loose epicenter of Sagal’s The Incomplete Guide to Running, a mildly entertaining book. The title riffs off of Jim Fixx’s running phenom book The Complete Guide to Running which helped usher in America’s love affair with running in the 1980s. Sagan’s book is not a running guide; this book is a memoir of sorts of Sagal’s running life. He writes, “There are not a lot of training tips in this book because in general I am skeptical that training advice is useful for most runners it’s analogous to writing advice. You want to be a writer? Don’t worry about the brand of pen or paper, software, or exercises or outlines, just sit down and write at whatever time of day in whatever room works for you. The more you write the better a writer you will become. You want to be a runner, run when you can and where you can increase your mileage gradually.” Due to his celebrity (?) Sagal has become somewhat a fixture at races around the country and this book is partly his background fodder. It’s a very undemanding read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jan Thullen

    Audio: Audible I won a 5k once. It was an informal Weight Watchers run/walk, and I was the only one doing any running. My prize was a certificate for free bagels every month for a year, which seemed like a paramedic pushing you into traffic. I’ve run/walked a few half marathons, hours behind my daughters who run fast and easily. The start of races is so energizing, but then you need to keep going, watching people effortlessly pass while it feels like chug, chug, wheeze, WTF. I was usually in the Audio: Audible I won a 5k once. It was an informal Weight Watchers run/walk, and I was the only one doing any running. My prize was a certificate for free bagels every month for a year, which seemed like a paramedic pushing you into traffic. I’ve run/walked a few half marathons, hours behind my daughters who run fast and easily. The start of races is so energizing, but then you need to keep going, watching people effortlessly pass while it feels like chug, chug, wheeze, WTF. I was usually in the last corral, where we were just happy to have shown up, sloggers, people whose running goals seem to exceed our abilities, but hey, we’re here, what a triumph. My only running these days is an occasional sprint down a hallway or some running in place until Alexa tells me my 3 minutes are up. Peter Sagal, NPR’s Wait, Wait Don’t Tell Me host and marathon runner, is a funny guy, and this audio read by him seemed perfect for a new year. It is, funny and maybe inspiring if you are more inclined to take on running goals. He has opinions on treadmills (don’t) and buying new shoes at the start (again, don’t), and I’d say, go for it, the listening and maybe the running. I’ll be right here, gamely running a little in place.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I read the book on a Saturday, punctuating my couch-potato-ness with a bunch of fast walks--and nary a run, having retired from running a couple of years ago. Thoroughly entertaining! Sagal mentions at one point that he’s “funny by profession." True. Also very honest about his repeated struggles with his weight and with a divorce that happened about the time of this memoir. I especially liked hearing how running changed his outlook during his teens, 30s, and the time of the book. Other favorite b I read the book on a Saturday, punctuating my couch-potato-ness with a bunch of fast walks--and nary a run, having retired from running a couple of years ago. Thoroughly entertaining! Sagal mentions at one point that he’s “funny by profession." True. Also very honest about his repeated struggles with his weight and with a divorce that happened about the time of this memoir. I especially liked hearing how running changed his outlook during his teens, 30s, and the time of the book. Other favorite bits: spare-no-grossness descriptions of what happens to one's body during a marathon, stories of guiding blind runners at the Boston Marathon, reflections on male anorexia. For most of the book I had in the back of my mind that maybe I’d take up running again, ~2 years after having stopped because of a foot problem. This morning, more sober, I reckon I’ll just keep fast-walking and yoga-ing, to not tempt fate. Enduring memory of Fixx’s Complete Book of Running--after which Segal named his book: Fixx kept a journal of the number/value of coins he found during his runs. He saw more pennies in later years, concluding that more people judged them not worth picking up.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    If you need anymore convincing that exercise almost always helps with emotions, listen to this. Peter Sagal has a great radio voice (of course) and he's a comedian so he applies those things to this discussion of how running has helped him weather his family falling apart and a difficult divorce as well as doing his best to keep his weight off. The book is a wee bit repetitive - there are a couple of times where he urges the listener to take out their earbuds to run (I like to run with mine if I If you need anymore convincing that exercise almost always helps with emotions, listen to this. Peter Sagal has a great radio voice (of course) and he's a comedian so he applies those things to this discussion of how running has helped him weather his family falling apart and a difficult divorce as well as doing his best to keep his weight off. The book is a wee bit repetitive - there are a couple of times where he urges the listener to take out their earbuds to run (I like to run with mine if I'm running alone but, like Sagal, I prefer to run with other people) and I thought briefly that my audiobook was repeating itself. But it's a minor quibble. He maintains humour throughout even when discussing depression but without minimizing the pain. His stories about guiding runners with vision challenges are fascinating and you have to be very glad that the person he was guiding in 2013 gutted out the last mile of the Boston marathon finishing just a very few minutes before the bombs went off. (The interview with NPR makes him rightfully cringe but hindsight is 20/20.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Conflicted on this one. I didn't find the running part inspirational, mostly because I will never be the runner Sagal is. I wanted to hear from Drew Carey (who Sagal offhandedly mentions has run a 4.5 hour marathon) instead of the 3 hour Sagal. The personal bits were more interesting, but Sagal's insistence on leaving out details (which I totally understand!) made the book less compelling. It did force me to examine some of my own prejudices though. Initially, knowing that Sagal has a high-profi Conflicted on this one. I didn't find the running part inspirational, mostly because I will never be the runner Sagal is. I wanted to hear from Drew Carey (who Sagal offhandedly mentions has run a 4.5 hour marathon) instead of the 3 hour Sagal. The personal bits were more interesting, but Sagal's insistence on leaving out details (which I totally understand!) made the book less compelling. It did force me to examine some of my own prejudices though. Initially, knowing that Sagal has a high-profile job and learning that he has a consuming, daily hobby I was inclined to blame him for his personal troubles. Revelations about depression made him much more sympathetic, but came at the very end of the book. This made me question my biases, which was good! But overall the most interesting parts of the book were given short shrift in favor of race-day tales which were entertaining, but ultimately unrelateable.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Mannon

    Like many others here, I wanted to love this book. I have been a competitive runner for decades. I also really enjoy Peter Sagal and I listen to Wait, Wait every weekend. The parts I appreciated the most about this book were his stories about running as a volunteer with the blind. I think this topic could have been a whole book in itself and the writing would have been much stronger with this focus. I agree with others that the relationship part of this book is incongruous with the running part Like many others here, I wanted to love this book. I have been a competitive runner for decades. I also really enjoy Peter Sagal and I listen to Wait, Wait every weekend. The parts I appreciated the most about this book were his stories about running as a volunteer with the blind. I think this topic could have been a whole book in itself and the writing would have been much stronger with this focus. I agree with others that the relationship part of this book is incongruous with the running part and neither is very strong. Sagal, perhaps, was trying to convey how running helps us process through difficult times in our lives, but I don't think that came through well. Another reviewer said that it seems like this book was rushed through publishing. Perhaps this is also the case. The book seemed very bumpy and unpolished, lacking much humor and filled with the not fully processed pain of divorce and a broken family. (I'm sorry Mr. Sagal!)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway from the publisher. Love listening to Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me on car rides to visit family, and I’ve always enjoyed Peter’s sense of humor. The book was great - not just about Peter’s experience and time spent running but about others’ experiences and time spent running as well. And about the Boston bombings. And life. And challenges. And failures. And on running being a solo and group sport. It didn’t tell any one specific story in detail, but it tells t I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway from the publisher. Love listening to Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me on car rides to visit family, and I’ve always enjoyed Peter’s sense of humor. The book was great - not just about Peter’s experience and time spent running but about others’ experiences and time spent running as well. And about the Boston bombings. And life. And challenges. And failures. And on running being a solo and group sport. It didn’t tell any one specific story in detail, but it tells the story of running and how it has helped and motivated countless people very well. This is just what I needed for motivation to put my running shoes back on and get back out there. Though, probably for a half marathon at the most. Or at the least some chill feet-to-pavement time of casual running. I’d recommend this book to anyone who has ever had at least one good run. Or wants to have at least one good run. Or anyone enjoys retelling of not so perfect but very much inspiring stories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laurelin

    As a newbie to the world of running, Peter Sagal's The Incomplete Book of Running was a fun read that's motivating me to keep training even as the winter weather takes a turn for the worse. Sagal weaves tales of the many races he's run with anecdotes about the colorful characters he's met in the world of running along the way. He also uses marathons as a metaphor for relationships, juxtaposing his marathon experiences with his painful divorce. His memoir is imbued with humor and wit, and it's an As a newbie to the world of running, Peter Sagal's The Incomplete Book of Running was a fun read that's motivating me to keep training even as the winter weather takes a turn for the worse. Sagal weaves tales of the many races he's run with anecdotes about the colorful characters he's met in the world of running along the way. He also uses marathons as a metaphor for relationships, juxtaposing his marathon experiences with his painful divorce. His memoir is imbued with humor and wit, and it's an easy read that will motivate anyone to jump off the couch and give running a try. I've only run in one race, but I don't think you need to be a runner to appreciate the warmth of Sagal's stories and his lessons on life. I'd recommend it to anyone in danger of falling off the exercise or running wagon.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.