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In the House in the Dark of the Woods

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"Once upon a time there was and there wasn't a woman who went to the woods." In this horror story set in colonial New England, a law-abiding Puritan woman goes missing. Or perhaps she has fled or abandoned her family. Or perhaps she's been kidnapped, and set loose to wander in the dense woods of the north. Alone and possibly lost, she meets another woman in the forest. Then "Once upon a time there was and there wasn't a woman who went to the woods." In this horror story set in colonial New England, a law-abiding Puritan woman goes missing. Or perhaps she has fled or abandoned her family. Or perhaps she's been kidnapped, and set loose to wander in the dense woods of the north. Alone and possibly lost, she meets another woman in the forest. Then everything changes. On a journey that will take her through dark woods full of almost-human wolves, through a deep well wet with the screams of men, and on a living ship made of human bones, our heroine may find that the evil she flees has been inside her all along. The eerie, disturbing story of one of our perennial fascinations--witchcraft in colonial America--In the House in the Dark of the Woods is a novel of psychological horror and suspense told in Laird Hunt's characteristically lyrical prose style. It is the story of a bewitching, a betrayal, a master huntress and her quarry. It is a story of anger, of evil, of hatred and of redemption. It is the story of a haunting, a story that makes up the bedrock of American mythology, but told in a vivid way you will never forget.


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"Once upon a time there was and there wasn't a woman who went to the woods." In this horror story set in colonial New England, a law-abiding Puritan woman goes missing. Or perhaps she has fled or abandoned her family. Or perhaps she's been kidnapped, and set loose to wander in the dense woods of the north. Alone and possibly lost, she meets another woman in the forest. Then "Once upon a time there was and there wasn't a woman who went to the woods." In this horror story set in colonial New England, a law-abiding Puritan woman goes missing. Or perhaps she has fled or abandoned her family. Or perhaps she's been kidnapped, and set loose to wander in the dense woods of the north. Alone and possibly lost, she meets another woman in the forest. Then everything changes. On a journey that will take her through dark woods full of almost-human wolves, through a deep well wet with the screams of men, and on a living ship made of human bones, our heroine may find that the evil she flees has been inside her all along. The eerie, disturbing story of one of our perennial fascinations--witchcraft in colonial America--In the House in the Dark of the Woods is a novel of psychological horror and suspense told in Laird Hunt's characteristically lyrical prose style. It is the story of a bewitching, a betrayal, a master huntress and her quarry. It is a story of anger, of evil, of hatred and of redemption. It is the story of a haunting, a story that makes up the bedrock of American mythology, but told in a vivid way you will never forget.

30 review for In the House in the Dark of the Woods

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Will. Leave this unrated as I will not finish after 50%. Have no idea what is going on and find I don't care enough to continue. For a while I was intrigued by the strangeness, but then it just became tiresome.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Strange read....confusing narrative....difficult to find a focal point or become interested in a character or direction of plot. Almost called it quits a couple of times. Gave it my all though re-reading pages and chapters bc of enticing book summary depicting witchcraft in colonial New England, but a no-go and a long 224 pages for me. Honestly, no clue I was even in colonial America. Thank you NetGalley and Little Brown and Company for the arc in exchange for my honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Janday

    I'm developing a bit of a habit of reading books about witches and primeval woodland magic. In the vein of traditional, heavily symbolic folk tales about the sonorant evil that lives in the deep forest, this story is about the unstoppable transformations that happen to women when they leave their hearths. Here be magic birds, killer swarms, tepid wells, glamor magic, hags, and the blackest magic of all: memory. While there isn't so much a "story" in these pages, there is rather an unquantifiable I'm developing a bit of a habit of reading books about witches and primeval woodland magic. In the vein of traditional, heavily symbolic folk tales about the sonorant evil that lives in the deep forest, this story is about the unstoppable transformations that happen to women when they leave their hearths. Here be magic birds, killer swarms, tepid wells, glamor magic, hags, and the blackest magic of all: memory. While there isn't so much a "story" in these pages, there is rather an unquantifiable, foreboding atmosphere that you could cut with a knife. But I warn you, it's going to bleed. If you loved The Good People or A Secret History of Witches, you'll devour this book like the ravenous crone you are. I read an early digital manuscript that I obtained as an employee of Hachette Book Group.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hanna

    Oh the beautiful cover, the ever-present feeling of dread, and magic derived from nature. This book was an adventure into the world of the women in the Dark of the woods. How did they get here? Why are they here? Or better yet, what have they done to get here? A story of redemption, or maybe punishment, or maybe even the power of reclamation. Witchcraft, wolves, spooky forests, and boats made of flesh & bone, this book has it all. For a dark tale that is absolutely impossible to summarize an Oh the beautiful cover, the ever-present feeling of dread, and magic derived from nature. This book was an adventure into the world of the women in the Dark of the woods. How did they get here? Why are they here? Or better yet, what have they done to get here? A story of redemption, or maybe punishment, or maybe even the power of reclamation. Witchcraft, wolves, spooky forests, and boats made of flesh & bone, this book has it all. For a dark tale that is absolutely impossible to summarize and leaves a lot for you to interpret, pick up this book!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Masters

    A wonderfully spooky, dreamlike treasure of a book. Positively dripping with atmosphere, Hunt's novel tells the seemingly simply story of a women getting lost in the woods in colonial New England. But the novel quickly becomes anything but ordinary, filled with fantastical images, beautiful writing, strange twists, and pervasive sense of intangible dread; 'In the House in the Dark of the Woods' is the perfect book to read by the fire on a dark night. Can't wait to revisit this again soon!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Sullivan

    Update: I want to clarify that this book is definitely objectively better than 1 Star. But I still hold that my experience of reading it was so disappointing that I’m sticking to this low rating. *** I have no idea what I just read. Obscure fiction works for me sometimes, but this was just too much. I couldn’t wait for it to end and I’m so glad to be done with it that I can’t even be bothered to write a full review. The writing itself is good, but I hated the experience of reading this so much.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    Inspired take on the traditional witches in the woods story. There is a lot going on in this fairly shot novel about a Goodwife (goody) who finds herself on the other side of reality. The first half of the novel is full of unexplained happenings and frustrating wandering, but Hunt manages to wrap things up into a tight little metaphor for Hell. In many ways, I agree with Hunt's take - circular time and grotesque games are the stuff of nightmares and hellscapes more so than any snide Dante-ish co Inspired take on the traditional witches in the woods story. There is a lot going on in this fairly shot novel about a Goodwife (goody) who finds herself on the other side of reality. The first half of the novel is full of unexplained happenings and frustrating wandering, but Hunt manages to wrap things up into a tight little metaphor for Hell. In many ways, I agree with Hunt's take - circular time and grotesque games are the stuff of nightmares and hellscapes more so than any snide Dante-ish contrapasso. And even beyond the magic and fantastic, there is a stark brutality that seeps into the novel as Hunt presents life for the religious ardent in a New America. A life that most stories of this type gloss over - for instance the inexperience and luxury of a full body bath... Anyway. Really well done.

  8. 5 out of 5

    KC

    A truly atmospheric tale of a young Puritan woman who finds herself lost in the woods, desperately trying to get home to her son and husband. While stumbling within the dark forest she soon encounters two strange and possibly menacing women and although little happens within the pages of this very short story, the imagery is extremely reflective of Hannah Kent. I absolutely loved the cover of this novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jee Hooked On Bookz

    Riveting! Devoured this in 2 days. You’d first meet a woman nicknamed ‘Goody‘ who would then meet Captain Jane, Eliza and Granny Someone, all of whom were witches, although one of them will claim she was not, and that she was in the woods to save lost souls, another fed on children and another seemed not to be who she claimed to be. Then there was also a mysterious character, Red Boy, whom was feared but respected by the dwellers of the woods. It took me awhile to get into Hart’s writing style. Bu Riveting! Devoured this in 2 days. You’d first meet a woman nicknamed ‘Goody‘ who would then meet Captain Jane, Eliza and Granny Someone, all of whom were witches, although one of them will claim she was not, and that she was in the woods to save lost souls, another fed on children and another seemed not to be who she claimed to be. Then there was also a mysterious character, Red Boy, whom was feared but respected by the dwellers of the woods. It took me awhile to get into Hart’s writing style. But once I got the hang of it, I was hooked! The story builds slowly and gradually, but beautifully... Just be prepared though, you don’t want to be caught off guard when you find yourself in the deepest, darkest part of the woods, one that’s chilling and eerie. You’d want to be ready when you are off flying above the clouds in a boat made of human flesh and human bones, with a witch claiming to 'have a mercy to perform'. The story gets darker with every page. You’ll be surrounded by screams, howls, cries so piercing you’ll have a hard time listening your thoughts. Be ready to be spellbound! Full review on my blog: https://hookedonbookzblog.wordpress.c...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alisa H. (worldswithinpages)

    Felt a bit disorganized and rambling which made it hard to follow. The idea behind the story was promising, but the execution was a bit lackluster. Thank you to Little Brown for the free copy and a chance to review!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Molly Riportella

    A mother’s errand turns dark and mystical in Hunt’s newest take on witches in Colonial New England. A bright-eyed Goody walks into the woods to gather berries for her husband and young son when the air turns dark. Soon our nameless protagonist is lost, and encounters a magnetic Captain Jane, a bizarre hermit named Eliza, and an ephemeral girl in a yellow dress, each one welcoming and yet exuding a cautious eagerness. Circumstances continually keep the Goody from making her way home. As the tale A mother’s errand turns dark and mystical in Hunt’s newest take on witches in Colonial New England. A bright-eyed Goody walks into the woods to gather berries for her husband and young son when the air turns dark. Soon our nameless protagonist is lost, and encounters a magnetic Captain Jane, a bizarre hermit named Eliza, and an ephemeral girl in a yellow dress, each one welcoming and yet exuding a cautious eagerness. Circumstances continually keep the Goody from making her way home. As the tale unravels, snippets of the Goody’s past come into focus and the reader begins to understand that Goody has much more in common with the dark, ominous forest than it first appeared. With an unambiguous ending, IN THE HOUSE IN THE DARK OF THE WOODS is a quick and thoroughly enjoyable horror novel. Hunt’s style will not please readers who strongly prefer prosaic writing, but the story is so engrossing that one can easily overcome any prejudices regarding narrative style. A perfect treat (or is it a trick?) for Halloween. Highly recommended for horror fans and admirers of lyrical narrative. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    2.5 stars. This book is written in surreal, dream-like, lyrical prose. If you like that, and if you like fairy tales, you will probably love this book. But for me, that kind of narrative is like seeing a story unfold behind frosted glass. It's just not my thing, and I prefer a more concrete, grounded style. So this book was only okay for me, but still, while I usually DNF most books with this writing style, this one kept me reading, so I'm rounding up. I did enjoy the eerie feeling I got as I re 2.5 stars. This book is written in surreal, dream-like, lyrical prose. If you like that, and if you like fairy tales, you will probably love this book. But for me, that kind of narrative is like seeing a story unfold behind frosted glass. It's just not my thing, and I prefer a more concrete, grounded style. So this book was only okay for me, but still, while I usually DNF most books with this writing style, this one kept me reading, so I'm rounding up. I did enjoy the eerie feeling I got as I read, though it started to lose me around the time our protagonist started sailing around the sky in a boat. This is the kind of book where I get to the end and feel like Brigitta in The Sound of Music saying, "But it doesn't mean anything!" That's just me though, and I think a lot of people will find it much more meaningful! Just not my jam, but it gets points for being one of the few books written in this style to keep me engaged.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bill Hsu

    One of my favorites of 2018 so far. The leisurely fairy-tale narrative keeps slipping. Questions are posed and shrugged off. Like in this delicious exchange: "Once upon a time there was and there wasn't a woman who went to the woods... Now why did she go?" "Why did she go?" "Why did she go and what did she do?" "Went down to the stream and took off her shoe." "And before that?" "Set off from her house in a bonnet blue." "Now tell me, what did she rue?" ... "What did she rue?" I don't come across many nove One of my favorites of 2018 so far. The leisurely fairy-tale narrative keeps slipping. Questions are posed and shrugged off. Like in this delicious exchange: "Once upon a time there was and there wasn't a woman who went to the woods... Now why did she go?" "Why did she go?" "Why did she go and what did she do?" "Went down to the stream and took off her shoe." "And before that?" "Set off from her house in a bonnet blue." "Now tell me, what did she rue?" ... "What did she rue?" I don't come across many novels that stubbornly resist explanations and resolutions, yet seem to hold my interest effortlessly. The marvelously odd and unstable ending is very satisfying. (Needless to say, if you refuse to dot your i's, you end up with a lot of one- and two-star goodreads ratings.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Audra (ouija.doodle.reads)

    Reading a Laird Hunt novel is always an immersive experience. His writing is something that latches on and doesn't let go easily, so if you're sitting down with one of his books, you might just consider your afternoon and evening booked. Though I think there is definitely a clear narrative to this story, I feel that this book is more about the journey, reading through the main character's experiences and fully coating yourself with the strange and unsettling rhythm and mystery of the words. There Reading a Laird Hunt novel is always an immersive experience. His writing is something that latches on and doesn't let go easily, so if you're sitting down with one of his books, you might just consider your afternoon and evening booked. Though I think there is definitely a clear narrative to this story, I feel that this book is more about the journey, reading through the main character's experiences and fully coating yourself with the strange and unsettling rhythm and mystery of the words. There are elements of fairy tale and magical realism in this fiercely lyrical fever dream of a tale; it is the historical reality of strait-laced Puritan New England coming up against the dark and tangled lore of witches and the woods. And it is a darkly empowering delicious journey. Also, I can't write a review of this one without commenting on the amazing cover art—one of my favorites of the year—and the interior design too. A book can be a piece of art on multiple levels, and this one is definitely a masterpiece. My thanks to Little Brown for sending me a finished copy to read and review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raven Ross

    This darkly entrancing novel was perfect for the Halloween season! The women are powerful and violent, but not lacking complexity in the least. The scenes are sooo creepy and enjoyable as fuuuuck. Go read it, because this literary journey leaves no regrets (well, for the readers at least).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Creepy, dark, twisty, enchanting, surreal, dreamlike(maybe more of a nightmare that you never want to leave),haunting, and a wild rush the whole way through. The only book to ever give me the creeps. (But in a good way.) I HIGHLY recommend! ETA: unnerving (the entire time!) brilliantly done, Laird!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chaitra

    It was slight, and as such it was not a bad reading experience. It took me a while to cotton on to where it was going. But even when I did, I didn't fully get the point. It's eerie and atmospheric, but ultimately too vague to be satisfying.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica (jessreadsalatte)

    *I was sent an Advance Readers Copy by Hatchette Book Group in exchange for an honest review* 4 Stars I actually quite enjoyed this one. I’m seeing a lot of reviews saying the writing wasn’t really their type, but for me, I enjoyed the writing a lot. It felt poet almost, like it was a dream-like fairytale.. or nightmare per se. It was a lot shorter than I was hoping for and at first, I was quite disappointed about that. But after reading it in full, I do think it’s a nice size for the content provi *I was sent an Advance Readers Copy by Hatchette Book Group in exchange for an honest review* 4 Stars I actually quite enjoyed this one. I’m seeing a lot of reviews saying the writing wasn’t really their type, but for me, I enjoyed the writing a lot. It felt poet almost, like it was a dream-like fairytale.. or nightmare per se. It was a lot shorter than I was hoping for and at first, I was quite disappointed about that. But after reading it in full, I do think it’s a nice size for the content provided. Overall, I really enjoyed it. It was creepy, poetic, and just an overall great read just in time for Halloween

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    3.5 I enjoyed this dark, twisty tale and it's very fairy like qualities. It reminds me of Jeanette Winterson's The Daylight Gate. Interesting twists and turns throughout, over all I think I'd have enjoyed it more had it been told in less of a fable-like way. Very good and of high quality.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This was really odd, but I think I liked it. It's very literary and symbolic and seems to be written in the vein of a traditional folk tale style. It's dark, a bit eerie, and leaves a lot of things ambiguous in a good way. Find this review at Forever Lost in Literature! This was an odd little book, but it was also a good one. This is going to be a shorter review because there really just isn't a lot to review. Although there is a plot and there are a few main characters, this is a book much more This was really odd, but I think I liked it. It's very literary and symbolic and seems to be written in the vein of a traditional folk tale style. It's dark, a bit eerie, and leaves a lot of things ambiguous in a good way. Find this review at Forever Lost in Literature! This was an odd little book, but it was also a good one. This is going to be a shorter review because there really just isn't a lot to review. Although there is a plot and there are a few main characters, this is a book much more focused on the themes, symbols, and overarching story. In the House in the Dark of the Woods is written with a strong folktake-esque style that reads very much like a classic tale, which makes it difficult to speak directly of and analyze the characters and plot itself. I can, however, speak to Hunt's writing style and how he makes this story so engaging. This book is brimming with magic, seemingly both innocent and overflowing with evil and ambiguity. There's a constant darkness that permeates the atmosphere at all times, but somehow this book still didn't feel quite as dark I as I had hoped it would be. Looking back on it, it feels darker than it seemed while I was reading it, if that makes sense, but I still found it very unsettling due to the constant sort of unease and sense of 'this isn't quite right' feeling present while reading it. The main characters we meet are our protagonist, a woman known as 'Goody' for this story, Eliza, Granny Someone, and Captain Jane. All are women with their own goals and desires that lead them to the various roles that they play. I enjoyed meeting these women and seeing how their role would play into the storyline and I especially loved how each seemed to have both light and darkness lurking within them. Goody's husband and child are also mentioned many times throughout the book in a way that made it seem as though she was steadfastly loyal to them, but that she didn't particularly care for them, either. There are a lot of interesting dynamics at play between the various characters that made for an intriguing story. I didn't love this book quite as much as I expected to and I did feel slightly lost at various points, but it was still an interesting enough story for me to follow along and enjoy. There is a lot of symbolism to unpack, as well as a lot of reading between the lines to fully understand hidden meanings and actions on behalf of the characters. For me, the ending was probably the best part of this novel--it was clever, revealing, and added an even darker and more ominous tone that the rest of the book already had. All in all, I would recommend this book for anyone looking for a dark folktale-esque to dive into this fall. Overall, I've given In the House in the Dark of the Woods four stars!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rory O'Connor

    In this dark fairy tale set in colonial New England, an unnamed puritan woman sets out in the forest to pick some berries for her husband and little boy. She does not return. Perhaps she’s lost. Or perhaps she’s fleeing her tyrannical husband and eerily quiet son. Lost, alone, and injured, she is rescued by a woman – Captain Jane – wrapped in the pelt of a wolf. She takes the Goody to Eliza’s charming stone cottage. But in the house in the dark of the woods, all is not as it seems. On the surface In this dark fairy tale set in colonial New England, an unnamed puritan woman sets out in the forest to pick some berries for her husband and little boy. She does not return. Perhaps she’s lost. Or perhaps she’s fleeing her tyrannical husband and eerily quiet son. Lost, alone, and injured, she is rescued by a woman – Captain Jane – wrapped in the pelt of a wolf. She takes the Goody to Eliza’s charming stone cottage. But in the house in the dark of the woods, all is not as it seems. On the surface, this is the story of a woman who is lost, wandering in the woods. She is a wife and mother, she wants to return to her family. Page by page, her journey gets darker the deeper she goes into the woods. She runs into things both fair and foul, beautiful and strange. Hunt’s prose is meandering and lyrical, with searing descriptions. “Its scratch was like the dry sparking of a flint and a page with fresh marks on it like a blazing porcupine. A tale written down must be like that, I thought. It must be like the block of wood of the body sprouting tiny tongues of fire and who knows where the next one will rise and burn.” Laird Hunt’s novel is filled with a dream-like terror – beautiful, huge swarms of insects, a water well most foul, a ship made of skin and bones, a watchful master – and filled with witches. Yet it is not terrifying. Is it filled with a building, pervasive dread? Yes. Does it frighten? Yes. This chilling fairy tale is tempered by its lovely, quiet prose and the slow revelation of the nature of these complicated women. In the House in the Dark of the Woods will haunt you, but you might just be grateful. Highly recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bri (brinocheeze)

    Thank you Little Brown Company for a copy of this book in an exchange for a honest review. Laird Hunt ’s In the House in the Dark of the Woods is a psychological horror rollercoaster. The cover art for this book was one of my favorite parts of the book, intriguing and inviting. I experienced a lot of confusion in the beginning of the book, but that didn’t stop me from powering through. I read over half the book in one sitting and devoured the other half the next day. Hunt’s beautiful lyrical wr Thank you Little Brown Company for a copy of this book in an exchange for a honest review. Laird Hunt ’s In the House in the Dark of the Woods is a psychological horror rollercoaster. The cover art for this book was one of my favorite parts of the book, intriguing and inviting. I experienced a lot of confusion in the beginning of the book, but that didn’t stop me from powering through. I read over half the book in one sitting and devoured the other half the next day. Hunt’s beautiful lyrical writing kept me engaged and needing to know more. A woman gets lost in the woods and her journey into the woods becomes about self recognition, punishment, and sacrifice. This woman encounters different characters and all the while she continues to say she needs to go home but she becomes enveloped with the dark world in the woods. The horror, psychological warfare, and character development in this book was breathtaking and well done. The character development in the ‘Elizas’ and Captain Jane towards the end of the book was profound and easily my favorite. Towards the end of the book is when everything fell into place for me and the epilogue was a jaw dropper and now I wonder will there be a continuation to this story? The reasoning behind my rating is because while I enjoyed it, I didn’t enjoy being confused for most of the book and the story finally clicking in my head at the end. I could’ve used a bit more of explanation and understanding throughout the book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a horror story that begins with a walk in the woods, set during colonial American times. It is a dark story populated with women with untoward motivations toward our main character, who is referred to as Goody. The plot is interesting, but suffers from the convoluted sentence structure that is apparently Hunt's signature style. If you can muscle through the prose, there is an atmospheric, creepy story to be had - but for being such a short story, this book reads like a much heftier tome. T This is a horror story that begins with a walk in the woods, set during colonial American times. It is a dark story populated with women with untoward motivations toward our main character, who is referred to as Goody. The plot is interesting, but suffers from the convoluted sentence structure that is apparently Hunt's signature style. If you can muscle through the prose, there is an atmospheric, creepy story to be had - but for being such a short story, this book reads like a much heftier tome. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an e-arc of In the House in the Dark of the Woods, this in now way affects my review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    What a strange little book! Its a self-described horror book but it honestly felt more like a fairy tale - in the eerie, bizarre way that the original tales are. There are some horror-y moments but the witches in the woods and the story itself has a spooky Hansel and Gretel feel. I really liked it though it was confusing at times and weird in the way that certain fantastical stories are (Alice in Wonderland, The Hike). It was the perfect length though for something like that - the book is small What a strange little book! Its a self-described horror book but it honestly felt more like a fairy tale - in the eerie, bizarre way that the original tales are. There are some horror-y moments but the witches in the woods and the story itself has a spooky Hansel and Gretel feel. I really liked it though it was confusing at times and weird in the way that certain fantastical stories are (Alice in Wonderland, The Hike). It was the perfect length though for something like that - the book is small in height and is only 214 pages!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dan Radovich

    Go buy this book, then wait until you have time to sit in a comfy chair for a read in one sitting trip into darkness. Hunt delivers a short tale of horror that will make fans of the genre giddy. His style takes a bit to get into, but what a treat you have here. Atmosphere! Characters! YES! Venture into the Dark of Laird Hunt's Woods and be prepared to be scared.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    *** I received a free audiobook thru Libro.fm's Bookseller Listener program*** The narration of this strange, magical, fevered dream is wonderful! The story is strange and witchy, which I liked, even if I didn't always know what the hell was going on. Definitely recommending the audiobook version! #Readathon

  27. 4 out of 5

    meg

    deliciously spooky; managed to be a book about witches in colonial america that wasn’t also deeply stupid and I have to respect that

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    this book is almost nonsensical — it’s creepy, visceral, and uniquely morbid. although the book itself is not violent, it’s violence is written in such a way that it allows the readers mind to almost run wild. the characters are people and yet not. they are almost animal, rabid. the women restless yet vengeful. demure with teeth. and I couldn’t put it down once I’d found the time to pick it up. it’s an absolute perfect read for this time of year and I’m so glad I had friends who suggested it to this book is almost nonsensical — it’s creepy, visceral, and uniquely morbid. although the book itself is not violent, it’s violence is written in such a way that it allows the readers mind to almost run wild. the characters are people and yet not. they are almost animal, rabid. the women restless yet vengeful. demure with teeth. and I couldn’t put it down once I’d found the time to pick it up. it’s an absolute perfect read for this time of year and I’m so glad I had friends who suggested it to me and doubly little brown for sending it my way. if you’re someone who likes the poetic and dark, I would highly recommend this book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I hated this book. Incomprehensible gibberish.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    One hauntingly cool and beautifully nuanced book!

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