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In this romantic road trip story perfect for fans of Sarah Dessen and Morgan Matson, a teen girl discovers the value of ordinary objects while learning to forgive her absent father. After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of In this romantic road trip story perfect for fans of Sarah Dessen and Morgan Matson, a teen girl discovers the value of ordinary objects while learning to forgive her absent father. After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. So when she finds a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast willing to pay enough money for the car to save her childhood home, Ali can’t wait to get going. Except Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift. But guess who does? Ali’s ex-boyfriend, Nico. And Nico has other plans. He persuades Ali that instead of selling the car, they should “trade up” the items they collect on their trip to eventually reach the monetary amount Ali needs. Agreeing with Nico’s crazy plan, Ali sets off on a unique adventure that is unlike anything she ever could have expected. And it’s through Ali’s travels, through the strangers she meets and the things that they value—and why they value them—that Ali eventually comes to understand her father and how his life may not have been as easy and carefree as she previously thought. Because just like the seemingly insignificant objects Ali collects, not everything is exactly as it appears.


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In this romantic road trip story perfect for fans of Sarah Dessen and Morgan Matson, a teen girl discovers the value of ordinary objects while learning to forgive her absent father. After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of In this romantic road trip story perfect for fans of Sarah Dessen and Morgan Matson, a teen girl discovers the value of ordinary objects while learning to forgive her absent father. After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. So when she finds a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast willing to pay enough money for the car to save her childhood home, Ali can’t wait to get going. Except Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift. But guess who does? Ali’s ex-boyfriend, Nico. And Nico has other plans. He persuades Ali that instead of selling the car, they should “trade up” the items they collect on their trip to eventually reach the monetary amount Ali needs. Agreeing with Nico’s crazy plan, Ali sets off on a unique adventure that is unlike anything she ever could have expected. And it’s through Ali’s travels, through the strangers she meets and the things that they value—and why they value them—that Ali eventually comes to understand her father and how his life may not have been as easy and carefree as she previously thought. Because just like the seemingly insignificant objects Ali collects, not everything is exactly as it appears.

30 review for The Geography of Lost Things

  1. 5 out of 5

    Camila Roy ••RoyIsReading••

    RATING: 4/5 e-ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review Another fun, romantic yet insightful novel by Jessica Brody. Having read and loved both A Week Of Mondays and The Chaos Of Standing Still, I had high expectations. Fortunately, this book did not disappoint. Jessica Brody is now an auto-buy author for me. Ali Collins doesn’t have room in her life for clutter or complications. So when her estranged father passes away and leaves her his only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird con RATING: 4/5 e-ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review Another fun, romantic yet insightful novel by Jessica Brody. Having read and loved both A Week Of Mondays and The Chaos Of Standing Still, I had high expectations. Fortunately, this book did not disappoint. Jessica Brody is now an auto-buy author for me. Ali Collins doesn’t have room in her life for clutter or complications. So when her estranged father passes away and leaves her his only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—Ali knows she won’t keep it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. And especially not when a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast is offering enough money for the car to save her childhood home from foreclosure. There’s only one problem, though. Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift.But her ex-boyfriend, Nico, does. The road trip leads Ali to an unknown truth about her father. A truth that will finally prove to Ali that some things—even broken things—are worth saving. In some cases, a synopsis can make a book sound better than it actually is. The premise of this book, however, doesn't do it justice. You might get the impression that this is just another romantic YA. But I promise you, it is more than that. Characters: (There’s only two relevant ones) Ali: I loved her. Sometimes it's hard for me to get attached to the story's narrator. I either find them annoying or uninteresting. But connecting with Ali was effortless. She felt like an actual person with strengths and flaws, not a made-up fictional character. We get to witness her grow and develop emotional throughout the book and I enjoyed her self-reflection journey immensely. Nico: He is so sweet, understanding and supportive of Ali's struggles. He's also really smart and patient. God, where can I find a guy like that? *sigh* Plot: Most of the events take place during the road trip. Nico suggests an alternative way of getting the money Ali needs. They begin to trade cheap objects for more expensive ones. it starts with a hair net and it escalates to chess sets, among other things. Eventually, Ali realizes that these objects are somehow connected to her father and his life (the life he lived apart from Ali and her mother when he abandoned them). The road trip was entertaining. It was fast-paced, so I never felt bored. I finished it a lot sooner than I anticipated. Themes and moral of the story: Forgiveness, love, family, shame, regret and nostalgia. I think the moral of the story is that, no matter how broken something or someone seems to be, saving them is worth a shot. Ali liked to dispose of things that brought back painful memories, but she learned that it is better to embrace those memories and let them shape you into a better person. The things we lose in the past might find us again in the future. ...every once in a while, if we're lucky, a road can lead us right to where we need to go. Straight towards the things we lost Overall, a great novel. I will keep it close to my heart. It definitely taught me an important life lesson. Would recommend!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carlene Inspired

    Find this review and others at Carlene Inspired. The Geography of Lost Things is, as the title suggests, a story about loss, lost things, and a road trip that teaches its main character about forgiveness and love. After her father passes away it seems the hits just keep on coming for Ali, first with her mother giving in to the letters left on their door and then with her dad's baby, his true love, his car, ending up in her possession. Ali doesn't hang on to things though and the car is the first Find this review and others at Carlene Inspired. The Geography of Lost Things is, as the title suggests, a story about loss, lost things, and a road trip that teaches its main character about forgiveness and love. After her father passes away it seems the hits just keep on coming for Ali, first with her mother giving in to the letters left on their door and then with her dad's baby, his true love, his car, ending up in her possession. Ali doesn't hang on to things though and the car is the first thing on her list to get rid of. While a road trip might sound fun for some, Ali is dreading this one, especially when her ex-boyfriend points out that she can't drive stick and that he'll need to accompany her. Nico sets out to prove to her that they can take worthless items and turn them into money by trading up, hoping to convince her that the car's monetary value is not as much as the memories and lessons it holds. What starts as a mission to unload an ugly reminder of her past turns into an insightful journey that teaches her about her father and the impact he'd made on her life despite not being around for much of it. The Geography of Lost Things is much more than the Young Adult storyline the blurb makes us believe it is. Jessica Brody has created characters who have experienced the same love and loss and hard lessons that many of us have. It's relatable and yet the story is incredibly unique. Ali is mature beyond her years, accustomed now at eighteen to having the same responsibilities as an adult. She works, is well aware of the financial struggles her absentee father put her mother through, and holds onto only the things and people she needs. What she doesn't realize though is how much her father's constant coming and going changed her, leaving her unable to trust and unable to leave the comfort of home. Ali is so strong and stubborn, I loved every single bit of her as the narrator of this story. Nico, her not so welcome companion, is equally as stubborn and in many ways even more well-versed on the adult world each was thrust into oo young. The car, the one thing he leaves to her in his passing, holds more memories than Ali would like to remember in it and it is the answer to rescuing her mom from financial ruin. The majority of the story takes place on the road, with the one night trip turning into something much more as Nico trades one item for another, detouring them from their final destination, a car dealership. As they trade up the items Ali begins to realize that this road trip, the items, they're all things that remind her of her father and as she fights the love and memories she has for him Nico encourages her along patiently, standing beside her as she mourns a man she didn't know as well as a child deserves. I loved that Jessica Brody explored family, forgiveness, love, and loss in The Geography of Lost Things, those emotions play such a massive role in every youth's life and the way they go through them is pivotal in growing up. Ali's father, though absent, shows immense love for his daughter in other ways and it is the journey that reveals that love to her. It was a fantastic novel and I highly recommend it to Young Adult readers. ARC provided.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    I always enjoy Brody's books, but usually there's a little something that keeps it from getting those all-the-stars. That was not the case with The Geography of Lost Things! Seriously, this is what I looked like when I finished reading this book: I was crying. I was smiling. I was crying AND smiling. I just loved this story. Five things I really loved about The Geography of Lost Things Brody really took me on a fantastic road trip. I got to travel through the picturesque Pacific Northwest, and Brod I always enjoy Brody's books, but usually there's a little something that keeps it from getting those all-the-stars. That was not the case with The Geography of Lost Things! Seriously, this is what I looked like when I finished reading this book: I was crying. I was smiling. I was crying AND smiling. I just loved this story. Five things I really loved about The Geography of Lost Things Brody really took me on a fantastic road trip. I got to travel through the picturesque Pacific Northwest, and Brody even took a little time out to visit some sights along the way. This was both a physical and emotional journey. Ali learned a lot about her dad and herself. She discovered there were things were holding her back, and recognized that figuring out her relationship with her dad and her past was the key to her future. Who knew Craig's List trading up could be so addictive. I found myself eager to see what they would barter for next, and even if it was fictional, I found the trades quite thrilling. I liked the additional characters these deals brought into the story as well. They all seemed to have some interesting personal stuff to add, which always had some sort of tie-in to Ali's situation. I also loved the idea of how an object can have multiple meanings depending on the person. This experience helped Ali see things in a different way, and each bit of progress she made was so gratifying for me. There were two pieces of information Brody made me work for, which I was worried she wasn't going to reveal. One was Ali's legal name. It wasn't the name, but rather the origin of the name that got me right in the feels. The second thing was about Nico. It was forever before we found out his story, but it definitely made me understand and love him more. And seriously, Nico ❤️ There were all these little flourishes, which enhanced my enjoyment, such as: The Everything About Everything podcasts, all the little quizzes embedded in the narrative, the multitude of love for The Goonies, and the dogs! I believe I smiled every time one of these things popped up. And I have to do a BONUS shoutout for the ending. Brody knows how to do an ending. I was so happy at that point in the books, I was bouncing up and down. Not only was it an ending that left me elated, it also answered a lot of questions, and for that, I am grateful. Overall: A fun and emotional journey, which allowed Ali to untangle her past to make room for her future. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  4. 5 out of 5

    Juliana

    I received a digital arc from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I absolutely LOVE this book. It was enjoyable from beginning to end. Ali is in financial trouble and is losing her childhood home if she can't come up with a hefty sum of money. Her father recently passed away and has left her a 1968 firebird convertible. She puts it up on Craigslist and a car collector offers more than enough money for it. There's just one problem. She can't drive stick and her ex-boyfriend can. Thus begin I received a digital arc from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I absolutely LOVE this book. It was enjoyable from beginning to end. Ali is in financial trouble and is losing her childhood home if she can't come up with a hefty sum of money. Her father recently passed away and has left her a 1968 firebird convertible. She puts it up on Craigslist and a car collector offers more than enough money for it. There's just one problem. She can't drive stick and her ex-boyfriend can. Thus begins an adventure of a lifetime, which starts out at a 5 hour road trip and turns into so much more. I found so much of this story to be enthralling and I was zipping through the pages to see where Ali and Nico were headed next. Ali is very hesitant to start the trip with her ex-boyfriend because they left so much up in the air when they broke up. You discover so much on their road trip, including why they broke up and that they clearly still have feelings for each other. Of course, there's a lot to the story that could be fixed with better communication but I'm not going to hold it against them. There's a nice simmering tension that lasts through much of the book that doesn't disappoint, Nico suggests that they begin trading up items to make the tip more interesting and to see if they can get more money. This part is probably my favorite part of the story. It's a unique adventure and I loved seeing what they traded, where they had to go, and just how far it got them. They run into big problems and you feel their pain right along with them. The reveals make your heart crack just a little bit and you want to reach through the pages to comfort them. Intertwined with the current story are flashbacks of Ali's time with her father. He was not the greatest man and it's clear she was conflicted in her feelings for him with her memories. It wasn't my favorite part of the story, only because it detracts from the present adventure. I did also find that while there was a deadline to needing money, there wasn't as much of a sense of urgency as I had hoped. We have one conversation from the mother in the beginning and we never hear from her again. It seems odd that she never checks in on her daughter once throughout the story. Ali has only one change of clothes and Nico has none but they never talk about needing other clothes. They're on the road for a few days and I definitely would want to change. This is nitpicking because I enjoyed everything else enough for it to earn 4 stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grace {Rebel Mommy Book Blog}

    Yay my first Jessica Brody book!! I own several but it took her latest to finally get me to pick one up. So happy I finally did. There was so much to love here: Road Trip!!! Who doesn't love a good road trip in a book??Exes on the Road Trip. I mean you know it's going to be interesting when exes are stuck together for that long. Craig's List. In order to get money they keep trading things up on Craig's List. It sounds silly but it was a really fun element to the trip. Quizzes. Within the book there Yay my first Jessica Brody book!! I own several but it took her latest to finally get me to pick one up. So happy I finally did. There was so much to love here: Road Trip!!! Who doesn't love a good road trip in a book??Exes on the Road Trip. I mean you know it's going to be interesting when exes are stuck together for that long. Craig's List. In order to get money they keep trading things up on Craig's List. It sounds silly but it was a really fun element to the trip. Quizzes. Within the book there were all these little quizzes she does in her mind. I LOVE quizzes so they were an extra fun touch. Beyond just those fun few items this book touched on a lot of good themes such a forgiveness, family and relationships. My biggest issue was with our MC Ali and just her stubborn way of thinking about things. I wanted her to be more open and a bit more realistic about things. Still, really enjoyed this one a lot. This review was originally posted on Rebel Mommy Book Blog

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kath (Read Forevermore)

    An arc of this book was sent to me by Simon Pulse (Simon Teen) in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Rating: 3.5 / 5 The Geography of Lost Things is a fun, cute and quick contemporary read. It has the fun road trip setting, something I’m completely obsessed with. However, I found the book to be a wee bit boring in terms of the plotting. Don’t get me wrong, it was a pretty good book. It’s just I didn’t find it to be overly interesting. — writing When it comes to rati An arc of this book was sent to me by Simon Pulse (Simon Teen) in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Rating: 3.5 / 5 The Geography of Lost Things is a fun, cute and quick contemporary read. It has the fun road trip setting, something I’m completely obsessed with. However, I found the book to be a wee bit boring in terms of the plotting. Don’t get me wrong, it was a pretty good book. It’s just I didn’t find it to be overly interesting. — writing When it comes to rating the writing style in contemporaries, I’m always quite lost. But this book was definitely cute, swoon worthy *coughs “Nico” coughs*, and cliché. What more could you ask for in a contemporary? — characters There are two main characters, Ali and Nico. They were super cute, and I LOVED THEM! Ali, also the narrator, was super relatable and I had an amazing time reading about her and watching her develop as a character. Nico, the ex, was super sweet and understanding of Ali. And geez was he patient with that girl. But seriously, where can I find a guy like that? 😭 — plot This book takes place on a road trip. I found the first half of this to be super fast-paced, while the ending half to be slow and confusing. I also found the second half to be super predictable, but I kind of liked it? But I did find this book to be super entertaining and I highly recommend it if you like books set on road trips.

  7. 5 out of 5

    alice (arctic books)

    I really liked this one! RTC!

  8. 5 out of 5

    La La

    4.5 stars on the blog. When I requested this on Netgalley I thought it was Adult Contemporary Fiction and when I started reading and realized it was YA, I braced myself for a slobbery romance overload, but it never raised its ugly head. Anyone who knows me knows I am allergic to romance, and even though this story does have it, it is not over the top in either amount or content. The author gets HUGE accolades from me for this. There are a lot of heavy themes in this book: absentee parentism, addic 4.5 stars on the blog. When I requested this on Netgalley I thought it was Adult Contemporary Fiction and when I started reading and realized it was YA, I braced myself for a slobbery romance overload, but it never raised its ugly head. Anyone who knows me knows I am allergic to romance, and even though this story does have it, it is not over the top in either amount or content. The author gets HUGE accolades from me for this. There are a lot of heavy themes in this book: absentee parentism, addiction, and abandonment issues, but the author doesn't hit the reader over the head with them. The story felt real, like you could be reading a memoir. The relationship between the MC and her ex is believable. Everything that happens is plausible. These things are important to me in Contemporary Fiction. There is a solid growth arc, and a change arc and many things learned along the way. It is pretty much YA perfection in those aspects. I have a problem with explicit sex scenes in YA because it is classified as being for twelve years of age and up, and what young readers might know and not know, and yes... what their parents might not want them to know varies widely between twelve and eighteen. The amorous moments in this story are written in a way where the reader is only going to visualize what they know. I like that. The .5 deduction comes from a few musical element missteps. Characters who are musicians seem to be the popular thing in YA right now and if there are scenes or settings which involve the music business, and the author doesn't have firsthand knowledge, they should have someone who does read it over. There were some totally off assumptions. There was a mystery of sorts in the story, too, and it was portioned out in just the right amounts and at the perfect pace. I thoroughly enjoyed my time reading this book. I was approved for an eARC, via Netgalley, in return for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Ali's father has done nothing but take and take from her mother. When he dies, he leaves her with his vintage convertible, which he always seemed to care about more than her. When she finds out what it's worth, she decides to sell it so she can save her house from being repossessed. But her ex-boyfriend, Nico, is the only one who can drive a stick shift with her up the coast... and he's not sure that selling it is a good idea. I raced through The Geography of Lost Things, much like Ali and Nico i Ali's father has done nothing but take and take from her mother. When he dies, he leaves her with his vintage convertible, which he always seemed to care about more than her. When she finds out what it's worth, she decides to sell it so she can save her house from being repossessed. But her ex-boyfriend, Nico, is the only one who can drive a stick shift with her up the coast... and he's not sure that selling it is a good idea. I raced through The Geography of Lost Things, much like Ali and Nico in her 1968 Firebird-- enthralled by the flurry of emotions and understanding Ali goes through. Between memories (both good and bad) of her father, her childhood, and her short lived love with Nico, pieces of what make Ali who she is are revealed in a beautiful, sharply orchestrated way. A gorgeous coming of age novel. I'm so thrilled that I got to take this journey, too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trianna

    This was a cute book that I flew through in one sitting. It had a fun road trip element (which I am always trash for) which was my favorite part. Other than that, it wasn't amazing and I am probably going to forget everything that happened quite soon.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Every one of her books centers around heartache, which often makes them hard to read. This was hard to read and frustrating at times, but overall, it was sweet. The ending was much better than I anticipated and I’m glad she got some closure.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shreya

    Thank you to Simon and Schuster for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. AAAAAAAAHHHHHHH???????!!!!!!!!!!!! Honestly, I think any review I write will have to contain a lot of excited screaming, but I'm going to try to write cohesive sentences anyways. Coming soon, I promise!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Madison

    The Geography of Lost Things is a fun road trip novel about learning to forgive and starting over. Jessica Brody weaves together a compelling story of second-chance romance and father-daughter relationships, family financial difficulties and learning to see again the value in little things. Ali has just days until the bank will reclaim her family home and she and her mother must find somewhere else to live. Years of paying the debts of her flaky father, of learning that his promises can’t be tru The Geography of Lost Things is a fun road trip novel about learning to forgive and starting over. Jessica Brody weaves together a compelling story of second-chance romance and father-daughter relationships, family financial difficulties and learning to see again the value in little things. Ali has just days until the bank will reclaim her family home and she and her mother must find somewhere else to live. Years of paying the debts of her flaky father, of learning that his promises can’t be trusted and knowing he will never come home have made Ali angry for everything she has lost. So, when a knock on the door reveals her father has left her his most prized possession - a 1968 Firebird convertible - Ali is quick to list it for sale, hoping the money can save her home. The only problem is the buyer is miles away and she can’t drive stick. Her ex-boyfriend Nico can, though, and when he wiggles his way into her road trip Ali is sure it’s going to be a disaster. What will a car, miles of road, too many secrets, lies and broken dreams to count and a possiblity of a redo bring? The Geography of Lost Things is a lighthearted, fun-to-read novel with some compelling themes about relationships, abandonment, and debt. Flashbacks are used throughout the book, both to reflect back on childhood memories of time Ali spent with her father and to moments in Ali’s relationship with Nico. Sweet, happy, sad, these memories build up a clear picture of why Ali responds to mentions of her father and relationship triggers as she does. Why she is so quick to sell her father’s car and why she has so much anger and distrust for her father are all made clear through memories of forgotten birthdays and broken promises. There is some mystery about why Nico and Ali broke up. While the flashbacks describe the time and place of the breakup and little hints are given - glove boxes, rain and comets- the final pieces of the puzzle don’t fall into place until much later in the story. This mystery becomes tied up with Ali’s relationship with and feelings towards her father. As Nico and Ali travel they begin to see each other in a fresh light. They also have the opportunity to reflect on their past relationship, the good times and the mistakes they made. The road trip allows Ali to explore her relationship with Nico and her father. It brings her into contact with people she never could have imagined and it gives her a chance to re-evaluate and start over. The Geography of Lost Things is a fresh and fun exploration of love, family and relationships. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own. Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library

  14. 5 out of 5

    Skye ~ A Court of Binge Reading

    **Thank you to NetGalley and to Simon and Schuster for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review** The Geography of Lost Things was the contemporary book I didn’t know I needed. I truly loved this story. I think anyone who has a strained relationship with a parent should read this book. The author writes such a raw, realistic interpretation of an estranged child and parent relationship. She also expertly conveys how this estrangement can affect the child and their behavior. At its co **Thank you to NetGalley and to Simon and Schuster for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review** The Geography of Lost Things was the contemporary book I didn’t know I needed. I truly loved this story. I think anyone who has a strained relationship with a parent should read this book. The author writes such a raw, realistic interpretation of an estranged child and parent relationship. She also expertly conveys how this estrangement can affect the child and their behavior. At its core, this story is about how the relationships between us and our parents can shape us in positive and negative ways. Ali’s father, Jackson, left her and her mom for the first time when she was 9 years old. The second time he left was when she was 12 years old. At first, she was too young to understand what his leaving meant. She believed him when he said his job as a roadie for his favorite band, Fear Epidemic, was extremely important. But, when he left for the second time with only a post-it on the fridge proclaiming, “I’m sorry, I had to” Ali realized she was not as important to him as the band. Needless to say, as a result of this Ali fiercely guards her heart and she cannot tolerate anyone lying to her as her father did. This book starts after Jackson, Ali’s father, has died. But, even though he may not be physically on the Earth anymore he is still wreaking havoc on Ali and her mom. Over the years, Jackson had taken out credit cards in her mom’s name and maxed them all out. Now, Ali and her mom’s house is going to be foreclosed on in a week--unless they can somehow wrangle 25,000 dollars. Ali’s mom has accepted that they will just have to move to an apartment complex, but Ali refuses to give up her home. So, when a guy comes by with the deed of her father’s most prized possession, his 1968 Firebird 400 Convertible, Ali’s first thought is to sell it. After she puts the ad on Craigslist, she realizes that this car is worth 30,000 dollars. Finally, Jackson is helping her instead of causing her more pain! The only problem is that the seller is 5 hours away in Crescent City and the Firebird is a stick-shift. Ali needs someone who can drive stick-shift...and the only person she knows is her ex, Nico. The Geography of Lost Things is the perfect summer read! It’s a road-trip full of self-discovery, healing, acceptance, grief, and forgiveness. Ali and Nico both let down their guards for the first time with each other. They both learn how to trust each other after that trust has been seemingly broken. Most of all, Ali learns that there is more to her father than she initially thought. Ahhh, word’s can’t accurately describe how much I enjoyed this book. I was surprised by how much I loved it. I connected with Ali and Nico easily; their pain was mine just as their joy was mine. I felt nearly every single emotion possible while reading this book: amusement, joy, sadness, anger, annoyance, and giddy. I cannot recommend this book enough. The message of this book is so important; sometimes the things we believe can be wrong, sometimes we judge someone too harshly, and sometimes we turn into the thing we fear most as a way to protect ourselves from being hurt.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Camila

    Awww que libro tan hermoso, ¡Me dieron ganas de irme de roadtrip! Sentí que literalmente también estaba dentro del viaje y AMÉ el personaje de Nico. Otro detalle que me fascino fue como describían la ruta de los destinos, hacían la historia más real y complementó mi fascinación por la geografía Gracias Juli, tus recomendaciones nunca fallan :) **Full review coming soon***

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    Find me: Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Spotify I am sooo thrilled to be part of the tour organized by Fantastic Flying Book Club for this amazing book. You can check out the tour schedule here. You know that feeling when you read the blurb and you think that you already know the story? That’s the impression I had of this book. I thought this would be a light read, complete with all the cliches ever made for road trips and contemporary romance stories. But I was wrong. ABSOLUTELY wrong. Beca Find me: Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Spotify I am sooo thrilled to be part of the tour organized by Fantastic Flying Book Club for this amazing book. You can check out the tour schedule here. You know that feeling when you read the blurb and you think that you already know the story? That’s the impression I had of this book. I thought this would be a light read, complete with all the cliches ever made for road trips and contemporary romance stories. But I was wrong. ABSOLUTELY wrong. Because this book was so, so much more than that. I am surprised at how much emotion there is in this book. I felt the awkwardness between Nico and Ali, their hurt over how things ended between them, and how they tried so hard to let go of their feelings. There was also one scene which was so shocking and devastating, I felt like their sorrow was my own. At one point, it even made me cry. One of the things that I loved about this book is how the story smoothly transitioned between the past and the present. It only gives you what is needed and will keep you guessing for more. It was unpredictable. It was intriguing. Reading this felt like an adventure on its own. If you think the focus of this book is the romance, you’re wrong. This book is about love, yes. But there are different kinds of love. Ultimately, this book is about trust and forgiveness. It is about how sometimes, we let go of things for fear of getting hurt, when at the end of the day, we’re the ones who end up hurting ourselves. "Sometimes, we throw things away and we never get them back. But sometimes, when we're really lucky, they come back to us." Review can also be found on my blog.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Hager

    I absolutely loved this book.  One of my favorite themes is grief, and this is a unique approach. We all know what it's like to miss people we love, but I don't know what it's like to lose someone you had a complicated relationship with. And Ali's relationship with her dad is mostly negative. There are positive aspects and memories, but mostly, she remembers him leaving and gone.  This book is an emotional roller coaster. A lot of that is due to the presence of her ex-boyfriend, but she's also con I absolutely loved this book.  One of my favorite themes is grief, and this is a unique approach. We all know what it's like to miss people we love, but I don't know what it's like to lose someone you had a complicated relationship with. And Ali's relationship with her dad is mostly negative. There are positive aspects and memories, but mostly, she remembers him leaving and gone.  This book is an emotional roller coaster. A lot of that is due to the presence of her ex-boyfriend, but she's also confronting her relationship with her dad. There are a lot of unmet expectations, and that's always a hard thing to confront. Like all of Jessica Brody's books, this is an incredibly fast, fun read. But it's also very thought provoking. Highly recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrienne

    This book has a lot going for it-great character development, well-defined plot, interesting scenarios, and superb writing. Ali was abandoned as a child by her father and she was left with his dad’s prized possession-a classic car that might be worth a lot of money. The only thing is, she can’t drive stick shift so her ex-boyfriend agrees to go with her to sell it to an interested buyer a few hundred miles away. Lots of adult crossover appeal. Thoroughly enjoyed this one. Thanks to the publisher This book has a lot going for it-great character development, well-defined plot, interesting scenarios, and superb writing. Ali was abandoned as a child by her father and she was left with his dad’s prized possession-a classic car that might be worth a lot of money. The only thing is, she can’t drive stick shift so her ex-boyfriend agrees to go with her to sell it to an interested buyer a few hundred miles away. Lots of adult crossover appeal. Thoroughly enjoyed this one. Thanks to the publisher for providing access to a review copy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Bassett

    Simple, fun, and easy to read. Great story. Reccomended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog! Thank you to Simon Pulse for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review. I loved everything about this book and for being almost 500 pages, it's a fast one. Once I started, I had to keep going to see whether they would reach the goal or not here. Plus, the relationship aspect between Ali and her dad plus Ali and Nico was far too intriguing to me not to be interested by. There's a lot of connected subplots between the father, his My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog! Thank you to Simon Pulse for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review. I loved everything about this book and for being almost 500 pages, it's a fast one. Once I started, I had to keep going to see whether they would reach the goal or not here. Plus, the relationship aspect between Ali and her dad plus Ali and Nico was far too intriguing to me not to be interested by. There's a lot of connected subplots between the father, his music connection, and Nico's seeming similarity to him that makes this very well written. Beyond the well written characters, the style it's written also made me fall in love too. Since it's a road trip book, the chapters are broken up by time stamps, locations, and the current inventory of items they have. It keeps that feeling of adventure and journey going even with the breaks between pages, which added to the sensory journey for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Real rating: 3.5 stars! It was a bit slow going at first but I ended up liking it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jenia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. So when she finds a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast willing to pay enough money for the car to save her childhood home, Ali can’t wait to get going. Except Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift. But guess who does? Ali’s ex-boyfriend, Nico. And Ni After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. So when she finds a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast willing to pay enough money for the car to save her childhood home, Ali can’t wait to get going. Except Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift. But guess who does? Ali’s ex-boyfriend, Nico. And Nico has other plans. He persuades Ali that instead of selling the car, they should “trade up” the items they collect on their trip to eventually reach the monetary amount Ali needs. Agreeing with Nico’s crazy plan, Ali sets off on a unique adventure that is unlike anything she ever could have expected. And it’s through Ali’s travels, through the strangers she meets and the things that they value—and why they value them—that Ali eventually comes to understand her father and how his life may not have been as easy and carefree as she previously thought. Because just like the seemingly insignificant objects Ali collects, not everything is exactly as it appears A beautiful, heart aching story. JESSICA BRODY has a way to hook the reader from start. This wasn’t first book I read by her. The novels that I had read prior to THE GEORAPHY OF LOST THINGS this one was my favorite so far. I always enjoyed road trip books, and once I found that this one was, I knew that I have to check it out. I’m so glad that I did. THE GEOGRAPHY OF LOST THINGS a road trip unlike any other ones that I read in past. I can’t imagine being stuck in car with an ex, I don’t think I would make it far before wanting get away from him. I am aware that only reason she did, is because Ali had no other choice, and she needed that money, in order to save her house. I knew that it was awkward being stuck in car with your ex boyfriend, but I am glad that he came. Nobody should go someone they met on craigslist to sell the car. It’s not safe. I am glad that Nico found out where she was going. I liked Ali, I loved how she was determined to sell the car, in order to save the house. That she was willing to make the trip all the way there. Nico, I liked him and it was clear to me, before Ali realized it, that he still cares about her. I feel as if that one of main reasons that he offered to come on the road trip with her. I wondered what would happen, would they sell the car, and go their separate ways? Or will the be able to reconnect, to start over. For me, it was the 2nd one. I feel as if Ali should let Nico explain that night that they broke up. I know that he would told her what’s going on with his mom. Maybe if he explained, they would be together. Of course I was rooting for them all through the book, that they would talk about it and get back together. It was clear that they had feeling for one another still, even if Ali was in denial about it. I was hoping that both of them will realize, that they belong together. One of best things about this road trip, besides the stops. The craigslist posts about exchanges of things they got, found. You never know what they came across, or who. They did collect few good things. They took the kind of road trip that I would loved to go to. THE GEOGRAPHY OF LOST THINGS will play with your emotions, and at the same time will keep reading, wondering what else would happen, if they would reach their destination. That’s a reason I finished this book fast, I didn’t want to put it down. Now that I read this book, I know that JESSICA BRODY that I will be reading for years to come. I am already curious what she will write next. The title fit the story perfectly. A book that everyone should read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Teenreadsdotcom

    How well do you get along with your ex? Ali’s father, Jackson, was never around. He didn’t help pay the bills, wasn’t there to see Ali grow up, enter high school, get her first job. Ali and her mother haven’t heard from Jackson for a while, and then the hospital calls. He’s dead. A few days later, a man shows up at the door, giving Ali what her father left in his will --- his 1968 Firebird 400 convertible. Ali does not want her father’s prized possession, a car he loved more than her family, tain How well do you get along with your ex? Ali’s father, Jackson, was never around. He didn’t help pay the bills, wasn’t there to see Ali grow up, enter high school, get her first job. Ali and her mother haven’t heard from Jackson for a while, and then the hospital calls. He’s dead. A few days later, a man shows up at the door, giving Ali what her father left in his will --- his 1968 Firebird 400 convertible. Ali does not want her father’s prized possession, a car he loved more than her family, tainted with the memories of what could have been. Even more of an incentive to sell the car is the car dealer a short distance away offering her a ton of money for it. Ali just has to bring the car to him. Then she’ll have enough money to help her mom save their house from foreclosure. There’s only one small issue. The Firebird has a manual transmission, and Ali doesn’t know how to drive stick. Another issue? There’s only one person Ali knows that can, and that’s her ex-boyfriend Nico. It’ll just be a quick trip, and then they can go back to ignoring each other. But things never happen the way that people expect. Ali has to endure setback after setback, and the awkwardness of being stuck with her ex for an extended period of time. When Nico acquires an item from a stranger, he sets them on a journey they never expected to happen. He and Ali meet many interesting people on their trip who offer them important lessons on what it means to forgive and forget. To start off, I live in California and have been up and down the coast, driving down the same roads and seeing the same massive redwoods that Jessica Brody describes in THE GEOGRAPHY OF LOST THINGS. I couldn’t imagine a better setting for this book to take place. California is a large state, with gorgeous scenery that really sets the tone for Ali and Nico’s adventure. I think the landscape fits their personalities and mirrors their inner emotions beautifully. But I’m not writing this review to show how much I love California, I’m here to tell you how much I loved this book. Brody is one of those authors who makes you feel like you’re there with the characters. You read about their epiphanies in real time and suddenly all the small details revealed earlier in the story make sense. Brody also has the unique talent of being able to use flashbacks in ways that don’t confuse readers. She can go from the present day to 10 years ago and back seamlessly. Her characters are always witty and dynamic and easy to love. Ali and Nico were very easy to fall for and I was rooting for their happy endings. The way Brody writes feels fuzzy and warm and lighthearted, like a hug from an old friend, but I still felt like I was learning more about life with each page I read. Ali and Nico met so many people over the course of the book. A few questions was all it took to discover something new about them, and to establish a relationship with someone who was a stranger just a few moments before. Everyone has a story to tell if someone is just willing to listen. Even the objects in this book had a story behind them, and it just goes to show how many new perspectives there are waiting to be revealed. THE GEOGRAPHY OF LOST THINGS is a fresh new take on the typical “trapped with my ex” trope. Brody manages to weave multiple stories, multiple lessons together to create a masterpiece reminding us that there’s always more to the story than what we see at face value.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rissi

    I received this product from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. The Geography of Lost Things by Jessica Brody | Book Review This review was originally posted on Finding Wonderland THE STORY | Ali is anything but sentimental when it comes to the father who abandoned her. This is why when she is willed his prize possession, a 1968 Firebird, she cannot be rid of the inheritance fast enough. Her mother is about to los I received this product from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. The Geography of Lost Things by Jessica Brody | Book Review This review was originally posted on Finding Wonderland THE STORY | Ali is anything but sentimental when it comes to the father who abandoned her. This is why when she is willed his prize possession, a 1968 Firebird, she cannot be rid of the inheritance fast enough. Her mother is about to lose their home, and loathe to move, Ali determines this car is the answer to their financial prayers. Her road trip plans to sell the car falls through when her ex-boyfriend, Nico invites himself along. What begins as a single goal mission soon changes when Ali is forced to reexamine her life, and her opinion of the man who left her. REVIEW | A rare occurrence in my reading habits is a good book that really surprises me. There are novels that take my breath away, but I usually crack them open anticipating this. There are novels that make me smile, but don’t leave a lasting impression, but again, I anticipate this. Then there are the books like ‘Lost Things’ that go in unexpected directions. The synopsis for this book does draw a reader in as does the cover, but I still have reservations because of the road trip angle. For some reason, this is a book trope I’m not overly fond of. I suspect this is because most of the stories I’ve experienced like this have been boring. Fortunately, The Geography of Lost Things is anything but. I did see one reviewer comment that this story could have been a little bit shorter, and I do agree. However even though the story many have been just as effective with 10-20 pages less, it never bores me. The characters help to keep the story rolling forward and easily capture our hearts. Ali is a kind of emotional wall in many ways, but through Nico, she learns a great deal. She opens herself to new experiences and her heart to new possibilities. It’s a journey not only in the physical sense (because of her road trip), but also for her emotional health. Then there’s Nico. His character is one of the best YA heroes I’ve met in recent years. Gentleman that he is, he’s not without his own scars. Brody writes a compelling story with a clear first-person narrative that introduces us to a variety of quirky characters. To go with this there is also fun chapter headings (which list Ali’s finds along the journey), Craigslist trades, and a beautiful little romance. Whether it’s Ali’s love of quizzes or Nico’s cute “swearing” game, this love story is hard not to adore. If you enjoy Emery Lord or Kasie West novels, The Geography of Lost Things is lovely. From the opening pages to the final lesson, it’s a gem. It’s the kind of book that makes me want to immediately pick up another novel from Jessica Brody, and the sort of story you should definitely seek out. Content: There is some profanity, but most is of the commonplace variety. There is some minor innuendo.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I have enjoyed books by Jessica Brody for a while. Since her early books, I have always enjoyed her different stories with beautifully written characters. I tend to cry in a lot of them, and I wasn't surprised when I had a moment of tears in this. So fair warning, there may be tears. The Geography of Lost Things by Jessica Brody is a beautiful story about finding yourself in the shadow of grief. At first, I wasn't sure if I was ready - 1) Contemporary stories and I don't always get along; 2) I al I have enjoyed books by Jessica Brody for a while. Since her early books, I have always enjoyed her different stories with beautifully written characters. I tend to cry in a lot of them, and I wasn't surprised when I had a moment of tears in this. So fair warning, there may be tears. The Geography of Lost Things by Jessica Brody is a beautiful story about finding yourself in the shadow of grief. At first, I wasn't sure if I was ready - 1) Contemporary stories and I don't always get along; 2) I almost always avoid stories about grief. But Brody knows her audience, her returning and potential new readers, and her words held my hand throughout the whole story.  The Geography of Lost Things is a story about Ali, a young girl who has had a broken childhood. Her father's departures throughout her childhood take a toil on her and her mother, leaving a trail of financial and emotional despair. Whether her father was physically or emotionally present, she had loved him. Until she didn't. The story begins with news of her father's death, and immediately, the theme of the story takes place. Ali is left with a car, which presents as a solution to their debt. The catch? She has to drive the car to the buyer with an unexpected guest. Estranged fathers are always a touchy subject. I've read many stories where stereotypically, fathers and daughters either love each other or hate each other. Brody did very well talking about the fine line of the in between. She sets the story with flashbacks, and in these moments we see a painted picture of how things were, how things progressed, and the demise of the end. The moments were mimicked Ali's feelings towards her father, all in varying stages of her life. There are more components of the story, and a character that I loved. And while I want to continue this conversation for forever, I'll minimize what I say to protect spoilers. I loved this story. The writing was beautiful, the pacing was natural, and the characters? I loved them. Brody is an author that I will always support, because her writing seems like it was meant for me. **Thank you to the publisher for providing an advanced copy for an honest review. My thoughts are my own. **

  26. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Originally posted at www.bickeringbookreviews.com I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Summary: Ali’s father disappeared six years ago. He left her and her mother without a backwards look. He’s only legacy is the huge amount of debt he left. Now, Ali and her mother are just days away from losing their home and Ali is desperate to find a solution and one appears when Ali’s father leaves her his prized 1968 Firebird convertible. Ali Originally posted at www.bickeringbookreviews.com I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Summary: Ali’s father disappeared six years ago. He left her and her mother without a backwards look. He’s only legacy is the huge amount of debt he left. Now, Ali and her mother are just days away from losing their home and Ali is desperate to find a solution and one appears when Ali’s father leaves her his prized 1968 Firebird convertible. Ali knows the car will save them and she has even found a buyer but there is just one problem. Ali doesn’t know how to drive the classic car’s standard transmission. Ali only knows one person who can drive a stick shift… her ex-boyfriend, Nico. Nico agrees to help Ali get the car to the buyer however Nico has a counter offer. Instead of selling the car Nico thinks they can trade items they find on Craigslist to earn the money Ali needs. Ali reluctantly agrees and the two start a journey up the west coast to try to save Ali’s home and possibly salvage their broken relationship. Review: When I was in college I stumbled across a website about a guy trying to turn a paperclip into a house through a series of trades. This became my favorite guilty pleasure and I checked in on the site at least once a week. All of this is me saying that there is a possibility that I was a little bias to The Geography of Lost Things. The story of two teens trying to make trades on Craigslist to earn enough money to save one of their homes hooked me from the first page. It is the perfect quirky storyline. The items they collect and the people the encounter felt original and gave the book a fresh feel. The plot was also the perfect storyline to compliment Ali’s journey of to forgive her late father and Ali and Nico’s journey back to each other. The two stories fit together perfectly and gave Ali and Nico a complexity which made this book feel more like a character driven family drama than just a fluffy love story. The characters, their histories, and their dreams made the book a perfect combination of realistic family drama, teen romance, and charming road trip story. The entire book comes together to verify that Jessica Brody is becoming a must read in YA realistic fiction.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mina

    **Review originally posted on My Fangirl Chronicles** My Rating: 4 stars I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Initial Thoughts: Despite owning several of Jessica Brody's novels, this is the first YA contemporary of hers that I've read. There were three main reasons why I decided to pick up this book: 1) the cover is absolutely beautiful; 2) I was very interested in the concept of discovering the value of ordinary objects; and 3) I had yet to find a good "road tr **Review originally posted on My Fangirl Chronicles** My Rating: 4 stars I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Initial Thoughts: Despite owning several of Jessica Brody's novels, this is the first YA contemporary of hers that I've read. There were three main reasons why I decided to pick up this book: 1) the cover is absolutely beautiful; 2) I was very interested in the concept of discovering the value of ordinary objects; and 3) I had yet to find a good "road trip story" that's been able to hold my attention for longer than two chapters - I'm not sure if that's because I get distracted easily or it's just my chronic issue of struggling with the first ten chapters of every book I pick up. Plus, every time I meet Jessica she's always been so lovely and amiable, I felt terrible having not read more of her books; I felt like it was time to finally start changing that! Things I Liked: As always with pretty much any book I read, I become highly invested in the main character and their love interest really early on, sort of right when they're first both introduced. I love seeing how they go through the whole pre-relationship phase, when feelings develop, change, and deepen until they demand to be acknowledged. In this book, however, Ali and Nico are exes right from the get-go and through this road trip we get to find out what caused their breakup and if, through this journey together, they're going to rekindle their romance. I found the whole mystery of the reason for their breakup to be really intriguing. That, and finding out what secret Nico has been hiding compelled me to keep reading. Another mystery that I really wanted to discover the truth to was the reason for Jackson's departure. I felt really sympathetic to Ali, especially during flashbacks to her childhood of all the times Jackson gave her good memories, only to disappoint her later on when she was old enough to realize his unhealthy and destructive pattern. The unveiling of the truth behind her father's constant absence had a more significant impact on me than I anticipated. Despite already having passed away, Jackson's presence and the effects of his decisions were strongly present throughout the entire novel, and acted as the guiding force for Ali's journey to forgiveness. I felt somewhat sympathetic towards Jackson but my heart mainly ached for Ali, especially once the effects and full consequences of his absence became clearer. I admit that I'm the type of person to hang onto things because of their sentimental value, so I really enjoyed seeing what different objects people valued and what they were willing to let go of to obtain something else. The whole trading concept that Nico introduced Ali to was a completely new thing to me, I had never heard of doing such a thing before so it was really interesting to learn about. Personally, I think it was too risky but it was one of the other aspects of the story that kept me enthralled and invested. The writing was engaging and I really enjoyed the list of inventory at the beginning of each chapter, especially during the later parts of the book. It was amusing to see how the labeling of some items in their inventory would change depending on Ali's opinions and emotions. Things I Disliked: I'm not really sure what it was exactly that prevented me from giving this book 5 stars, but I guess there's a few little things that when added up together made me feel 4 stars best conveyed my feelings towards it. I thought it was a little strange that Ali's mom didn't contact her more frequently during her road trip with Nico, and I also wish there had been an epilogue of some sort to give me more closure at the end. I liked how it ended and it felt fitting for the story overall, but I guess I was looking for a more solid ending. I also wouldn't have minded a bit more in the romance department, but I do understand that this story was mainly about Ali and her relationship with her father. Final Thoughts: An insightful exploration of the impact of an absentee parent in a young girl's life, The Geography of Lost Things is equal parts heartbreaking and heartwarming. This book addresses abandonment and addiction while highlighting the importance of forgiveness, family, love, and finding the courage to pave one's own path. This resonated with me more than I anticipated and I am certain that I will always remember the life lessons taught within its pages. I would definitely recommend this if you enjoy heartfelt road trip stories.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arrow Jameson

    5/5 OR 10/10 STARS I HAVE FOUND IT. I HAVE FINALLY FOUND THE PERFECT ROAD TRIP BOOK. I DID NOT THINK I’D FIND ONE THIS YEAR WITH ALL THE MEDIOCRE BOOKS ON-THE-ROAD I’D READ, BUT I DID. I CAN REST IN PEACE NOW. No but seriously, I’m the happiest person on this planet. Road trips are a freaking brilliant concept and the fact that nobody in the YA world seemed to be getting it spot-on was just devastating; finding this book that got it just right is the coolest thing ever. The best thing about this bo 5/5 OR 10/10 STARS I HAVE FOUND IT. I HAVE FINALLY FOUND THE PERFECT ROAD TRIP BOOK. I DID NOT THINK I’D FIND ONE THIS YEAR WITH ALL THE MEDIOCRE BOOKS ON-THE-ROAD I’D READ, BUT I DID. I CAN REST IN PEACE NOW. No but seriously, I’m the happiest person on this planet. Road trips are a freaking brilliant concept and the fact that nobody in the YA world seemed to be getting it spot-on was just devastating; finding this book that got it just right is the coolest thing ever. The best thing about this book was EVERYTHING. I know, this review seems a lot like me just rambling and talking incoherently about it in praise, but it was worth it. I devoured it in half a day, all while admiring how well Brody has got all the aspects of this book. Ali and Nico were both just amazing. The fact that the story revolved around only both of them as protagonists and didn’t have any other unnecessary best friends and random characters was just the best thing. The road trip focused on their development and adventures; neither of them was clingy or cringeworthy or stupid, and I didn’t feel bored of them even though I read about just them for an entire book. That’s some good characters right there. Then, of course, the trades. Oh my god, that sub-plot was freaking awesome!! I mean, it didn’t just have her rough past and their relationship struggles and self-discovery, it also had a super cute, dope other plot that BROUGHT THIS BOOK TOGETHER. Good old Craigslist. Nuh-uh, you gotta read the book, folks. And finally, the infamous depressing-past-plot. I was afraid it was gonna ruin the book because, I mean . . . but it didn’t! Even the depressing past had a super cool twist! I loved how it strung together with the adventure Nico and Ali had with the “barter system”, and there wasn’t anything that seemed forced or WTF. I thought I’d be worn out by the end because it is a comparatively longer book, but I’m still craving more??? I think Nico-Ali is one of the cutest couples I’ve read about. Ever. And The Geography Of Lost Things is one of the bets books I’ve read. Ever.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    From my blog and instagram account - @livereadandprosper You’ve got a surprise in the mailbox and it’s a book you’ve been so excited to read! You: A. Jump for joy and begin reading it immediately. B. Hide away in your room and don’t come out until your finished reading it. C. All of the above 😍 Thank you Simon Pulse for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review! Past decisions that Ali’s dad has made things quite hard for her and her mom. Now that he’s passed and left Ali and her mom in a lot From my blog and instagram account - @livereadandprosper You’ve got a surprise in the mailbox and it’s a book you’ve been so excited to read! You: A. Jump for joy and begin reading it immediately. B. Hide away in your room and don’t come out until your finished reading it. C. All of the above 😍 Thank you Simon Pulse for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review! Past decisions that Ali’s dad has made things quite hard for her and her mom. Now that he’s passed and left Ali and her mom in a lot of debt, it’s time to figure out what to do. Then comes another surprise – Ali’s dad’s car in mint condition. She puts it up on Craig’s List and someone wants it for a great amount of cash. Ali’s willing to drive the 5 hours to sell it, problem is she can’t drive stick. In comes Ali’s ex-boyfriend. He’s willing to help, but is she willing to survive the trip with all the baggage they’ve left for each other? This book keeps you coming back for more, over and over again! The book references the past multiple times and leaves cliff hangers throughout. Why did her dad leave? What was in Nico’s glovebox that’s driving Ali so crazy? There’s tons of little references like this….Doesn’t make sense to you now, but you’ve just gotta find out for yourself! I felt like I had this uneasy stomach reading it because I felt for Ali so much. She was making such a huge decision to drive so far with her ex just to help her family out. Oh, the anxiety! I was on the edge of my seat the whole time. Honestly, it was everything in me to not read the last chapter of the book to find my missing answers I so desperately needed. It does remind me of other romance adventure novels, but it was still a very loved book by me. 4/5 Stars

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Urquhart

    For more reviews, please visit my blog: What's She Reading? If you're looking for a nice road trip book, then this is for you. I, personally, LOVE road trip books and this one checked all of the boxes. It definitely makes me want to take a drive along the Western coastline of the US! Ali and Nico were both likable characters and I thought the pacing of the book was really good. We didn't have to spend too much time in the car with them, but were given just enough as a reader to feel like our chara For more reviews, please visit my blog: What's She Reading? If you're looking for a nice road trip book, then this is for you. I, personally, LOVE road trip books and this one checked all of the boxes. It definitely makes me want to take a drive along the Western coastline of the US! Ali and Nico were both likable characters and I thought the pacing of the book was really good. We didn't have to spend too much time in the car with them, but were given just enough as a reader to feel like our characters were on a journey and not just appearing in different cities. The plot of the book was good as well. I thought it created a really good atmosphere for Ali to grow and develop as a character. I thought the flashbacks were written well and didn't detract from the pacing of what was supposed to be happening currently. I love the idea of trading up for things even if I think it's a tad unrealistic. Overall, I thought this book was great! My only issues really, involved Ali and Nico's relationship. Specifically, I felt like the amount of time we spent in Ali's head thinking about the demise of their relationship was too much. Either tell us what was in the freaking glove box already, or stop bringing it up! Other than that, though, this book was a good read--perfect for summer or maybe just when you wish it felt a little more summery. Overall Rating: 4 Language: Mild Violence: None Smoking/Drinking: Mild Sexual Content: Mild Note: I received this book free from the author/blog tour in exchange for an honest review.

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