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The Ten Commandments for Business Failure

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Don Keough—a former top executive at Coca-Cola and now chairman of the elite investment banking firm Allen & Company—has witnessed plenty of failures in his sixty-year career (including New Coke). He has also been friends with some of the most successful people in business history, including Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Rupert Murdoch, and Peter Drucker. Now Don Keough—a former top executive at Coca-Cola and now chairman of the elite investment banking firm Allen & Company—has witnessed plenty of failures in his sixty-year career (including New Coke). He has also been friends with some of the most successful people in business history, including Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Rupert Murdoch, and Peter Drucker. Now this elder statesman reveals how great enterprises get into trouble. Even the smartest executives can fall into the trap of believing in their own infallibility. When that happens, more bad decisions are sure to follow. This light-hearted “how-not-to” book includes anecdotes from Keough’s long career as well as other infamous failures. His commandments for failure include: Quit Taking Risks; Be Inflexible; Assume Infallibility; Put All Your Faith in Experts; Send Mixed Messages; and Be Afraid of the Future. As he writes, “After a lifetime in business I’ve never been able to develop a step-by-step formula that will guarantee success. What I could do, however, was talk about how to lose. I guarantee that anyone who follows my formula will be a highly successful loser.”


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Don Keough—a former top executive at Coca-Cola and now chairman of the elite investment banking firm Allen & Company—has witnessed plenty of failures in his sixty-year career (including New Coke). He has also been friends with some of the most successful people in business history, including Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Rupert Murdoch, and Peter Drucker. Now Don Keough—a former top executive at Coca-Cola and now chairman of the elite investment banking firm Allen & Company—has witnessed plenty of failures in his sixty-year career (including New Coke). He has also been friends with some of the most successful people in business history, including Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Rupert Murdoch, and Peter Drucker. Now this elder statesman reveals how great enterprises get into trouble. Even the smartest executives can fall into the trap of believing in their own infallibility. When that happens, more bad decisions are sure to follow. This light-hearted “how-not-to” book includes anecdotes from Keough’s long career as well as other infamous failures. His commandments for failure include: Quit Taking Risks; Be Inflexible; Assume Infallibility; Put All Your Faith in Experts; Send Mixed Messages; and Be Afraid of the Future. As he writes, “After a lifetime in business I’ve never been able to develop a step-by-step formula that will guarantee success. What I could do, however, was talk about how to lose. I guarantee that anyone who follows my formula will be a highly successful loser.”

30 review for The Ten Commandments for Business Failure

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nazrul Buang

    Just finished reading "The Ten Commandments for Business Failure" (2008) by Donald R. Keough. To be honest, I only bought this book as a wild card for my second Amazon book purchases, and I wasn't really hoping for a lot from it. It turned out to be a dark horse of a business book. What caught my attention about Keough's book is that it goes against the common patterns of most business books. While most business books would be about ways to succeed (and being very adamant about the ways), Keough Just finished reading "The Ten Commandments for Business Failure" (2008) by Donald R. Keough. To be honest, I only bought this book as a wild card for my second Amazon book purchases, and I wasn't really hoping for a lot from it. It turned out to be a dark horse of a business book. What caught my attention about Keough's book is that it goes against the common patterns of most business books. While most business books would be about ways to succeed (and being very adamant about the ways), Keough belongs to the same school of business thought such as Phil Rosenzweig and Warren Buffett. He admits to not know the formula to success but insteads offers the recipe of success. Like how Rozenzweig took on the unfamiliar path of dispelling most business books, Keough does it by announcing what most business books don't do: tell people what NOT to do for business. The Ten Commandments are very simple, but Keough's wealth in sharing his knowledge proves invaluable. From sharing Drucker's philosophies to even pointing out the common psychological tendencies in business, his no-nonsense classic approach is one that stands firm in an industry where people to churn out new fancy terms for practices that never seem to guarantee success. As an added bonus, he also offers an optimistic eleventh commandment not just for business people but basically to anyone who reads the book. Lastly, as a huge favour, he theoretically applies his commandments to the 2008 financial crisis and understands that somebody out there is certainly committing one of his commandments right now, which he wishes would not bear heavy consequences. NEXT BOOK: "Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions" (2008) by Dan Ariely.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lokesh Joshi

    I had a startup, I managed that for 5 years before getting acquired. This book is really good !

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sylv C

    This is a nice, short book - it won't teach you how to market your product, raise capital, or the other "skills" covered in typical business books, but it will give you some sense of the temperament required to lead and build a business. Keough peppers the book with lively examples both from Coca-Cola and other businesses. He ends with the important, even though obvious, reminder that loss of optimism and passion are a certain recipe for failure, and that the term "American Dream" was actually c This is a nice, short book - it won't teach you how to market your product, raise capital, or the other "skills" covered in typical business books, but it will give you some sense of the temperament required to lead and build a business. Keough peppers the book with lively examples both from Coca-Cola and other businesses. He ends with the important, even though obvious, reminder that loss of optimism and passion are a certain recipe for failure, and that the term "American Dream" was actually coined in the depths of the Great Depression. It's a nice book to keep on the shelf and gift others. Keough keeps the book squeaky clean and doesn't go into some of the activities necessary for any large business, which are covered in depth either in Pendergrast's or Allen's company histories of Coca-Cola.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Deepak Shah

    Business leaders turned writers tend to take a more politically correct tone instead of presenting uncomfortable truths. So, I did expect some of it from a former president of Coca-Cola. But, here's where the problem lies: excessive optimism is no solution to pessimism. There lies a fine balance, but perhaps, with good intentions, Don wanted to make it look simple. This robs readers from uncomfortable truths. I am pretty sure that many great business leaders like Elon Musk flaunt multiple of "Do Business leaders turned writers tend to take a more politically correct tone instead of presenting uncomfortable truths. So, I did expect some of it from a former president of Coca-Cola. But, here's where the problem lies: excessive optimism is no solution to pessimism. There lies a fine balance, but perhaps, with good intentions, Don wanted to make it look simple. This robs readers from uncomfortable truths. I am pretty sure that many great business leaders like Elon Musk flaunt multiple of "Donald's commandments of failure". In nutshell, while I am convinced that these surely are commandments for business failure I disagree that all of these rules apply to 100% of cases as Donald insists?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vorbis

    2 1/2 stars. Strange that a book with so many praises sung on its front cover ends up with no-one reading and reviewing it. I picked it up in the free library outside work. The commandments in this book are probably true. That said, the part where you have to really believe in your product - and they believed that what they were selling was the 'spirit' of coke rather than an actual drink... I dunno. How much can you believe in an addictive drink that has so much sugar in it it's actively bad fo 2 1/2 stars. Strange that a book with so many praises sung on its front cover ends up with no-one reading and reviewing it. I picked it up in the free library outside work. The commandments in this book are probably true. That said, the part where you have to really believe in your product - and they believed that what they were selling was the 'spirit' of coke rather than an actual drink... I dunno. How much can you believe in an addictive drink that has so much sugar in it it's actively bad for you? It's like getting to read the lawyer from Thank You For Smoking's biography. Glib, but feels a bit off.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sjors

    This slim volume reads like an elaborate speech given by a highly successful business aristocrat - and this is exactly what it is. Sadly, not a lot to learn here for me - although I liked the approach of giving a recipe for business failure, rather than success. The dust jacket made me laugh when I did a double take of it and read that on it were words of praise from the likes of Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Rupert Murdoch, former president GHW Bush, etc etc. Oh and it notes that Warren Buffet wrote This slim volume reads like an elaborate speech given by a highly successful business aristocrat - and this is exactly what it is. Sadly, not a lot to learn here for me - although I liked the approach of giving a recipe for business failure, rather than success. The dust jacket made me laugh when I did a double take of it and read that on it were words of praise from the likes of Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Rupert Murdoch, former president GHW Bush, etc etc. Oh and it notes that Warren Buffet wrote the introduction. This has to be the highest praised slender volume I have yet encountered. Mr. Keough has an enviable set of friends.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tirath

    It's by Don Keough - - so I assumed there would be some very good insights. And they are great. I liked the negative template - and while a lot of these things seem simple, people regularly fall for these mistakes. Best takeaways: watch the bull, not the man fight bureaucracy with all your might - its one of the greatest dissatisfaction inducers for your people shut the noise - - odds are that certain countries have a lot of progress ahead in store culture can be contagious 2 men looked out of prison It's by Don Keough - - so I assumed there would be some very good insights. And they are great. I liked the negative template - and while a lot of these things seem simple, people regularly fall for these mistakes. Best takeaways: watch the bull, not the man fight bureaucracy with all your might - its one of the greatest dissatisfaction inducers for your people shut the noise - - odds are that certain countries have a lot of progress ahead in store culture can be contagious 2 men looked out of prison bars - one saw mud, the other saw stars The bits on New Coke, Coke's bureaucracy, and continuous need to change stuff within the company - - were great learnings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amit Trivedi

    A fantastic book coming from one of the most successful corporate chiefs of one of the most successful companies in the world. The style of writing is amazingly simple. The book is full of lessons that anyone can apply - not just the CXOs, but also anyone in any leadership position. A must read for alll leaders and aspiring leaders.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ted Smith

    One of the best books I've ever read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Grzegorz

    Who is this book for: entrepreneurs, executives, business managers Contents: Don Keough was a longtime Coca-Cola executive who shares 10 pieces of anti-advice. I found it an interesting way of presenting the topic - he of course says some of the things to do instead of the don'ts but there are no simple prescriptions - there are to be thought about by oneself. The commandments are presented with colorful examples of his experiences at Coca-Cola. The 10 commandments: 1. Quit Taking Risks. 2. Be Inflex Who is this book for: entrepreneurs, executives, business managers Contents: Don Keough was a longtime Coca-Cola executive who shares 10 pieces of anti-advice. I found it an interesting way of presenting the topic - he of course says some of the things to do instead of the don'ts but there are no simple prescriptions - there are to be thought about by oneself. The commandments are presented with colorful examples of his experiences at Coca-Cola. The 10 commandments: 1. Quit Taking Risks. 2. Be Inflexible. 3. Isolate Yourself. 4. Assume Infallibility. 5. Play the Game Close to the Foul Line. 6. Don't Take Time to Think. 7. Put All Your Faith in Experts and Outside Consultants. 8. Love Your Bureaucracy. 9. Send Mixed Messages. 10. Be Afraid of the Future. And bonus commandment: Lose Your Passion for Work - for Life.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gaurav Sangtani

    Today I will discuss with you the latest book I have read, “The Ten Commandments for Business Failure” by “Donald R. Keough“. The book which is written by former president of the Coca Cola Company, recommended by “Bill Gates” and “Jack Welch” and forwarded by “Warren Buffet”, was promising enough to be picked up from the store. To be precise, the book stood to the all these recommendations. Donald Keough has poured his vital experience of Coca Cola years into this book. This is the first manageme Today I will discuss with you the latest book I have read, “The Ten Commandments for Business Failure” by “Donald R. Keough“. The book which is written by former president of the Coca Cola Company, recommended by “Bill Gates” and “Jack Welch” and forwarded by “Warren Buffet”, was promising enough to be picked up from the store. To be precise, the book stood to the all these recommendations. Donald Keough has poured his vital experience of Coca Cola years into this book. This is the first management book I have read which had flow of a fiction book. You hardly feel like putting it down. Small stories bring great wisdom, moreover when these are witnesses by author himself. Keough’s style of writing is compelling enough to convince you about the business wisdon you have already read at many places. As author starts in the introduction: ” When I was asked to talk about how to win, my response was I couldn’t do that. What I could do, however, was to talk about how to lose and I offered a guarantee that anyone who followed my formula would be a highly successful loser.” The book gives you ten (rather eleven) commandments for failure in Business, if you want to be successful, you need to be careful not to follow any of these. Commandments are made of simple business wisdom such as “Quit taking risks“, “Assume infallibility” and “Don’t take time to think” and it also includes some of the new wisdom such as “Put all your faith in Experts” and “Send mixed messages“. Its not the advice which makes the book interesting, rather the way the advice is presented. Small stories, amusing quotes and author’s personal experience make it good and delightful read. The book is humorous, compelling and entertaining enough for atleast one read, although I am going to read it again. I will repeat Jack Welch’s recommendation “A Must read for every leader” and I will further add ” A must read for anyone who aspires to be leader and learn from others mistake rather than making his own”. I would definately recommned it and rate it 4 out of 5. Now I will leave with you some of the parts of the book I liked: “A company doesn’t fail to do anything, Individuals do…… ….Businesses are the product and the extension of the personal characteristics of its leaders – the lengthened shadows of the men and women who run them.” “It’s human nature. I’ve got something. Why risk it? Who knows what’s on the other side of the mountain? Don’t go there!” “Einstein said he needed in his office: a desk or a table, a chair, some pencils, paper, and a very large warebasket “for all the mistakes I will make.” “ “If a company never has a failure, I submit that their management is probably not discontented enough to justify their salaries.” “When you’re comfortable, the temptation to quit taking risks is so great, it’d almost irresistible. And failure is almost inevitable.” “It not only behooves us to treat our fellow human beings with compassion and respect, it is essential for our collective survival. Unethical men and women can flourish for periods, sometimes very long periods, but ultimately their lack of morality – and their lack of humility – destroys them. You cannot build a strong and lasting business on a rotten foundation.” “If you want to get nothing done, make sure that administrative concerns take precedence over all others! Love your bureaucracy!…….Meetings are the religious service of a great bureaucracy and the bureaucrats are fervently religious…….. These meetings generate more paperwork, more e-mails, more calls, more meetings. In fact, most often there are meetings to plan meetings.” “I have never met a successful person who did not express love for what he did and care about it passionately… they can’t imagine doing anything else. They seem almost crazy about it. “ There is lot more I will leave upon you to read finally a story author shares from his life, I liked it. “In my teens, while working during the summer at the city stockyards, I got a offer becoming a bull buyer. A bull buyer was supposed to choose appropriate bull for slaughter from the bulls scattered all over the yard. After my first day on the job, he came by and asked to see what I’d bought. It turned out I’d paid too much for quite a few of the bulls. He reminded me that I was among salesmen and because of my young age, they would try to flatter me, be nice to me, distract me, but he pulled out a chart and said here’s exactly what you are looking for in a bull. No matter what anyone says, never deviate from these basic requirements of conformation. He said, “Watch the bull, not the man”. That simple advice has stuck with me through my years in business even to this day”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kamilan

    INTRODUCTION #"Take the whole question of leadership, which has been studied to death, always inconclusively." pg. 2 #"In fact, the more you have achieved, the more these commandments apply to you." pg. 9 COMMANDMENT ONE: QUIT TAKING RISKS #"Let's-do-it-like-we-always-did-it-because-that's-the-way-we-always-did-it" culture. pg. 12 #Yet as our lives get softer and richer and more comfortable, the temptation to quit taking risks is so great. pg. 15 #The National Federation of Independent Business Resear INTRODUCTION #"Take the whole question of leadership, which has been studied to death, always inconclusively." pg. 2 #"In fact, the more you have achieved, the more these commandments apply to you." pg. 9 COMMANDMENT ONE: QUIT TAKING RISKS #"Let's-do-it-like-we-always-did-it-because-that's-the-way-we-always-did-it" culture. pg. 12 #Yet as our lives get softer and richer and more comfortable, the temptation to quit taking risks is so great. pg. 15 #The National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation estimates that after just five years only half of new businesses with employees are still operating, and many of those at a loss. pg. 15 #"Tell me again why everything is so good. Isn't there something more we ought to be worrying about today in order to make sure we have something else to worry about tomorrow?" pg. 16 #The business had to be built on trust. pg. 17 COMMANDMENT FIVE: PLAY THE GAME CLOSE TO THE FOUL LINE #A few corporate leaders found themselves no longer asking "Is it right?" but "Is it legal?" And then from that point, it was just a short leap to "Can we get away with it?" pg. 72. #"I was either a white knight to help lead the company or I was the living embodiment of the famous Peter Principle, promoted beyond my level of competence." pg. 74

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Common Sense Rules, And Alot Of Corporate History "Moneymavericks92@Gmail.com", This book is not difficult, or highly technical. It's nothing of that nature, rather it's some 10 common sense rules that we all should know. This book is aimed at people with large organizations more so than the smaller business man, nevertheless all of the points are applicable in some way or form. But there is one thing I must say, although this book is about commandments of failure, it's also a decent source of c Common Sense Rules, And Alot Of Corporate History "Moneymavericks92@Gmail.com", This book is not difficult, or highly technical. It's nothing of that nature, rather it's some 10 common sense rules that we all should know. This book is aimed at people with large organizations more so than the smaller business man, nevertheless all of the points are applicable in some way or form. But there is one thing I must say, although this book is about commandments of failure, it's also a decent source of corporate history. For nearly every commandment, Donald gives an example of some company that was practicing it at some point and also how they solved their problems. And that's something every business man should take on board Verdict: Give this book a read, it won't take you long. I tend to read my books in a cover to cover fashion. and it took me about 3 days to finish. The lessons are clear and fairly concise Physical Quality: The Hardback is strong, the pages turn with ease and aren't to thin. the print of the words are of decent size, not tiny as a dictionary's words. I know books like those can look rather unwelcoming

  14. 4 out of 5

    Viktor Nilsson

    Full of good lessons to learn about business and leadership, but quite disorganized. I feel like a book like this should be made either long and full of detailed studies proving each point, or very short and supported by witty anecdotes. Keough seems to have lost his path, the book definitely ends up being in the anecdote-category, but unfortunately dwells on way too long on most subjects. I would have loved to see it being much shorter - sometimes it feels like he's embarrassed about how little Full of good lessons to learn about business and leadership, but quite disorganized. I feel like a book like this should be made either long and full of detailed studies proving each point, or very short and supported by witty anecdotes. Keough seems to have lost his path, the book definitely ends up being in the anecdote-category, but unfortunately dwells on way too long on most subjects. I would have loved to see it being much shorter - sometimes it feels like he's embarrassed about how little he has written and just has to fill it out some more. Much of this (such as the superiority of USA's gene pool) becomes irrelevant to the topic at hand. Very often it all just slips into lavish praise of how superior USA is. Which might be nice encouragement for any US reader I guess, but won't teach you much. In the end however, I learned some good lessons. The reader could surely come back to the list of contents (chapter names - each of his "commandments") for review many times later on, but might not find its content worth reading more than once.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Supertramp

    #103 Unknowingly I bought this book couple of days after Donald's death. Which, later I realized that I brought this on an offer which was because of his death. The book is all about how to fail successfully. It may sound weird and bizarre but Mr.Donald has written it in a great fashion. He helps a lot to you to fail at any business. I really like the way the he gave the real life incidents and business strategies, especially about the historical facts of Coca-cola. They are very intriguing and i #103 Unknowingly I bought this book couple of days after Donald's death. Which, later I realized that I brought this on an offer which was because of his death. The book is all about how to fail successfully. It may sound weird and bizarre but Mr.Donald has written it in a great fashion. He helps a lot to you to fail at any business. I really like the way the he gave the real life incidents and business strategies, especially about the historical facts of Coca-cola. They are very intriguing and insightful. At most of the parts I do agree with the author. But I didn't like his generalization at some points. Remember , I didn't say they don't exist or they are not facts I just say I didn't like. It's a good book to read nothing more than that. Foreword by Warren Buffet is an additional wisdom!!

  16. 4 out of 5

    AC

    An interesting mix of advice and examples. My only real complaint is that the style was not consistent throughout--on the first few chapters the advice was always about what not to do, then in later chapters it often advises what you should do. After a few chapters of everything he said being the thing to avoid it takes a moment to shift (and then be on your guard throughout the rest of the book) to everything he says being what you should do. But overall there are some good lessons here, backed An interesting mix of advice and examples. My only real complaint is that the style was not consistent throughout--on the first few chapters the advice was always about what not to do, then in later chapters it often advises what you should do. After a few chapters of everything he said being the thing to avoid it takes a moment to shift (and then be on your guard throughout the rest of the book) to everything he says being what you should do. But overall there are some good lessons here, backed up with real world examples and the humility to admit that some of these mistakes are first-hand experiences.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pyoungsung Choi

    성공 및 처세술에 관련한 책들은 사기에 가깝다. 성공이라고 부르는 일정한 경제적, 사회적 성공에 이르는 길은 누구도 모르기 때문이다. 그걸 안다면 왜 책의 저자는 성공을 못했는가 반문해봐야 한다. 그럼에도 많은 사람들이 여전히 허황된 성공에의 지름길을 찾고 싶어한다. 이런 세태에서 이 책의 가치는 빛난다. 성공보다는 실패하는 확실한 방법에 대해 이야기한다. 그리고 그 실패 방법을 피하기 위해 노력하는 것이 크나큰 실패로 무너지는 것을 예방하는 것이라고 말한다. 10장의 지나친 긍정론과 책 전반의 이야기가 단순한 일화의 예시에 그친 것은 아쉬운 점이지만 그래도 충분히 읽을만한 책이다.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kiki Marriott

    Read it in about an hour. An easy read, but worth thinking about to digest slowly. Rock solid advice for anyone in business, especially in these times of crisis, it gave me a much needed pick-up. The title may sound negative but this man's positivity and passion are clear on every page. Highly recommended.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Not into business books, but Don Keough is about to speak at ND. This one is very helpful for dealing with any project/job/endeavor/relationship. The book is conversational and very pithy in tone. Good read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shaunak De

    A well written book which lends a refreshing insight into the workings of a global organization. The commentary is interspersed with interesting anecdotes and recollections from the authors career at coca-cola. A highly recommended read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    C

    สมแลวทีบิล เกตสบอกวา หนังสือเลมนี ทำใหคุณประสบความสำเรจ ไดมากกวาหนังสือทังชันรวมกันเสียอีก หนังสือเลมนี ผูเขียนบอกถึงจุดผิดพลาด ทีมักจะเจอ ยิงประสบความสำเรจเทาไร ยิงเสียงตอความผิดพลาดเทานัน สมแล้วที่บิล เกตส์บอกว่า หนังสือเล่มนี้ ทำให้คุณประสบความสำเร็จ ได้มากกว่าหนังสือทั้งชั้นรวมกันเสียอีก หนังสือเล่มนี้ ผู้เขียนบอกถึงจุดผิดพลาด ที่มักจะเจอ ยิ่งประสบความสำเร็จเท่าไร ยิ่งเสี่ยงต่อความผิดพลาดเท่านั้น

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ryan_hg

    Highly recommended to be read by serious entrepreneur out there. The simple yet profound wisdom stated in this book will surely be able to help you to avoid some pitfalls along your journey of entrepreneurship

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexandr Iscenco

    Quite interesting and useful book with a lot of good thoughts. However, these thoughts and ideas are nothing new; the book is like a summary of the main well-known mistakes in entrepreneurship you should be aware of and try to avoid.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mohd Ashraf

    Straightforward, full of wisdom and certainly a good read...!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Something to be read by every executive and those who will become executives! An easy read with simple solutions for creating a better, more successful work environment.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krishna Agarwal

    A good book no doubt... but basically for people who have attained some good success in their business. will help people check their ego but then people with ego, dog they read books to learn??

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zacky Zane

    เปนหนังสือทีอานแลววางไมลงจริงๆ คนทำธุรกิจทุกคนตองอานเลมนีครับ มันจะชวยชีวิตธุรกิจของคุณไดอยางแนนอน เป็นหนังสือที่อ่านแล้ววางไม่ลงจริงๆ คนทำธุรกิจทุกคนต้องอ่านเล่มนี้ครับ มันจะช่วยชีวิตธุรกิจของคุณได้อย่างแน่นอน

  28. 4 out of 5

    Iddi Rashid

    Nice book and easy to read

  29. 4 out of 5

    Prakhar

    The book is a quick read. Its like an essay about what not to do to avoid business failure. Its not a great book like many others in the genre, but still a good compilation.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lanko

    Really good book. It's great that while there are tons of books "teaching" how to be successful, we can learn so much more knowing why we fail.

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