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Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite: My Story

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The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21 The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21st birthday,” says Roger Daltrey, the powerhouse vocalist of The Who. The result of this introspection is a remarkable memoir, instantly captivating, funny and frank, chock-full of well-earned wisdom and one-of-kind anecdotes from a raucous life that spans a tumultuous time of change in Britain and America. Born during the air bombing of London in 1944, Daltrey fought his way (literally) through school and poverty and began to assemble the band that would become The Who while working at a sheet metal factory in 1961. In Daltrey’s voice, the familiar stories—how they got into smashing up their kit, the infighting, Keith Moon’s antics—take on a new, intimate life. Also here is the creative journey through the unforgettable hits including My Generation, Substitute, Pinball Wizard, and the great albums, Who’s Next, Tommy, and Quadrophenia. Amidst all the music and mayhem, the drugs, the premature deaths, the ruined hotel rooms, Roger is our perfect narrator, remaining sober (relatively) and observant and determined to make The Who bigger and bigger. Not only his personal story, this is the definitive biography of The Who.


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The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21 The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21st birthday,” says Roger Daltrey, the powerhouse vocalist of The Who. The result of this introspection is a remarkable memoir, instantly captivating, funny and frank, chock-full of well-earned wisdom and one-of-kind anecdotes from a raucous life that spans a tumultuous time of change in Britain and America. Born during the air bombing of London in 1944, Daltrey fought his way (literally) through school and poverty and began to assemble the band that would become The Who while working at a sheet metal factory in 1961. In Daltrey’s voice, the familiar stories—how they got into smashing up their kit, the infighting, Keith Moon’s antics—take on a new, intimate life. Also here is the creative journey through the unforgettable hits including My Generation, Substitute, Pinball Wizard, and the great albums, Who’s Next, Tommy, and Quadrophenia. Amidst all the music and mayhem, the drugs, the premature deaths, the ruined hotel rooms, Roger is our perfect narrator, remaining sober (relatively) and observant and determined to make The Who bigger and bigger. Not only his personal story, this is the definitive biography of The Who.

30 review for Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite: My Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite by Roger Daltrey is a 2018 Henry Holt and Co. Publication. “We’ll be fighting in the streets, with our children at our feet. And the morals that they worship will be gone. And the men who spurred us on, Sit in judgment of all wrong. They decide, and the shotgun sings the song.” Roger Daltrey. He’s kind of an enigma, I think, or least to me he is. It seems every member of “The Who’ has commanded newspaper headlines over the years, everyone except Roger, that is. No ins Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite by Roger Daltrey is a 2018 Henry Holt and Co. Publication. “We’ll be fighting in the streets, with our children at our feet. And the morals that they worship will be gone. And the men who spurred us on, Sit in judgment of all wrong. They decide, and the shotgun sings the song.” Roger Daltrey. He’s kind of an enigma, I think, or least to me he is. It seems every member of “The Who’ has commanded newspaper headlines over the years, everyone except Roger, that is. No insane antics or stage theatrics or ghastly criminal charges like those of Keith or Pete. Roger, by comparison, seems to be rather square. I honestly didn’t know a thing about him, other than what everyone else knows, which is centered around his career. I couldn’t have told you one single thing about his personal life. I didn’t even know the basics about him, like if he was married or had children, although I’d heard a few tales of his childhood where he had garnered a tough guy reputation. But the details of his upbringing were sketchy. So, while I’ve become rather picky about memoirs, especially those written by rock stars, my curiosity about Roger Daltrey won the day. I love ‘The Who’. Having formed in 1964, this is a group I’ve listened to my entire life. This is one of those enduring bands that have weathered many storms and survived over fifty years as a group. Incredible, when you think about it. Not only has Roger witnessed some monumental historical events, he’s also been a participant in them. Having spent so many years behind that insular rock star barrier, Roger has become accustomed to a way of life most of us couldn’t relate to. That’s part of the reason these books are so alluring, I suppose. We hear stories about conflict within the band, we know Roger and Pete had their moments, we know about Keith Moon’s antics, and of John’s untimely death. But we still want a bird’s eye view, want to hear Roger’s side of the story, want to relive his glory days with him, take a trip down memory lane, and want to know more about the person behind the rock star persona. Roger’s approach to his memoir is laid back and relaxed. He can be funny, charming, and witty, but does show a vulnerable side of himself on a very rare occasion. Despite spending over fifty years in a rock group, he still carries a blue collar, working class, chip on his shoulder. He’s capable of sensitivity and spoke with some candor regarding childhood and school days, traumas, which left emotional scars he battled much of his adult life, hiding his lack of confidence behind a tough exterior. “That was the point at which the headmaster, Mr. Kibblewhite, decided I was expelled. “We can’t control you, Daltrey”, he said. “You’re Out.” And, as I left his office for the last time, a parting gesture: “You’ll never make anything of your life, Daltrey.” “Thanks a lot, Mr. Kibblewhite, I thought.” Yet, despite those rare glimpses inside of Roger’s more personal inner workings, the bulk of the book is centered on Roger’s professional life-the road to success, and all the various ups and downs of forming a band, maintaining the unit, and of course coping with the excesses of life on the road and the horrible tragedies the band endured. However, I never really felt the chemistry between Roger and his band-mates, other than a poignant story he shared about Keith shortly before his death. Roger’s personal relationships with friends, colleagues, and women also lacked warmth or depth. There was one point in the book where, despite knowing this is normal operating procedure for rock stars, I still balked, and yes, passed judgments, on Roger’s view of fidelity or his case- infidelity. What he described was a one-sided open marriage. He was not to be expected to be ‘a good boy’ while on the road, because it gets lonely out there. I wondered if his wife got lonely during his long absences, and if she were expected to be ‘a good girl’ while he was away or if she was free to engage in emotion-less hookups too. I mean, according to Roger, a shag is just a shag. A bit of a double standard there, I think. But this was not the only area in which Roger showed his age. It was a bit ironic that one of the ‘My Generation’ performers sounded very old-fashioned at times. Occasionally Roger would bait the reader with information, only to never mention the subject again or to toss it out as an aside, when it clearly deserved more attention and time than he gave it. The book comes in at less than three hundred pages, which is awfully thin, when there is obviously so much ground to cover, both personally and professionally. Still, as far as rock memoirs go, this one is not too shabby. Roger is articulate and plain spoken, and as a performer, he knew how to keep the reader’s attention. The material is well-organized, and he does hit upon the major events that shaped his life and career, which for the casual fan will certainly suffice. Diehard fans will be pleased with anything Roger puts out there, but others, like myself, may wish there had been a little more bulk and depth than was provided. One thing I was reminded of, however, is how compared to many other people in his line of work, Roger is very dependable and is a solid performer. He may not have the artistic flair of Pete Townshend, but he puts everything into his shows, has an admirable work ethic, is a highly energetic singer, and a really nice set of pipes. He grew to be a versatile, multi-talented artist in his own right, not only as the ‘The Who’frontman, but with other groups, and in his acting roles. He’s a superstar rock star all the way from the top of those luscious curly locks to the tips of his toes. Roger has recently experienced some health problems, and is feeling the effects of his age, but he’s still sharp as ever, and still performs with ‘The Who’ on occasion His most recent show took place just this past summer. One can’t help but feel awed by the longevity of the group, and Roger’s stamina. His body of work is impressive, as is the mark he’s made on the world of music and the arts. 3.5 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Detroit

    It wasn’t easy for Roger Daltrey to get noticed in The Who, let alone heard, on stage with three Geniuses (punctuation is mine), all of whom wanted to play lead, steering clear of the carnage while keeping the others in line, usually with his fists, each performance hitting home like a smart bomb payload. Despite my endless proselytizing about the likes of Mott the Hoople, The New York Dolls, Ramones, The Clash, and The Stooges, The Who, in their prime, were the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band to ev It wasn’t easy for Roger Daltrey to get noticed in The Who, let alone heard, on stage with three Geniuses (punctuation is mine), all of whom wanted to play lead, steering clear of the carnage while keeping the others in line, usually with his fists, each performance hitting home like a smart bomb payload. Despite my endless proselytizing about the likes of Mott the Hoople, The New York Dolls, Ramones, The Clash, and The Stooges, The Who, in their prime, were the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band to ever draw air. If you didn’t see them while Keith Moon was still alive, you missed them forever. He was not only the best drummer in rock and roll, he was the ONLY one, sounding like he came from out of nowhere to take over the world. Of course I’m carried away right now. That’s the way I roll. With Moon behind the drum kit doing whatever the hell he was doing back there – 40 years after he left this mortal coil, it’s still a mystery - John Entwistle standing stock still and bringing the thunder with fingers seemingly made of asbestos, and Pete Townshend abusing Rickenbackers, Gibsons, and his own hands, nervous and constantly hacked off about something, Daltrey handled the dirty business of bringing Townshend’s ofttimes difficult and complicated lyrics to the great unwashed masses, swinging his microphone like David with the sling against Goliath, unknowingly creating the sartorial template for most singers that came after him, curls, fringes, and all. For those who have been following the plot, Daltrey once again rolls out the stories of a band hamstrung by its own myth, but somehow they never get old, from the good to the bad to the absurd to the tragic (the early demises of Entwistle and Moon and the Cincinnati “stampede” show). There’s The Who’s live U.S. debut at the Monterey Pop Festival, which ended with the ritual destruction of equipment and what amounted to assault and battery on the flower children - leaving them wondering what happened to peace and love - and contrary to popular belief, making Jimi Hendrix’s ensuing flaming guitar sacrifice look like a cub scout marshmallow roast. There’s the Cow Palace show where Keith Moon couldn’t soldier on after a self-administered dose of monkey tranquilizer, causing Townshend to ask the throng, “Can anybody play the drums?” Enter 19-year-old Scot Halpin. You couldn’t make stuff like this up if you tried. The rubble left in the wake of their appearance on “The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” insured it would be their only appearance on a U.S. variety show, the band going off script with a post lip-synched “My Generation” detonation of a triple-packed charge concealed inside Moon’s bass drum which left Townshend with hair ablaze and completely deaf for 20 minutes. I could go on all night but Daltrey tells it better. All of this is just a fancy way of saying I loved this book. Townshend once predicted The Who would go out with a “huge explosion” and while the fuse has been lit for some years now, nothing yet. Daltrey and Townshend carry on for an army of true believers laboring under the impression that as long as the beautiful rock god and the ugly genius are up there, it still IS The Who. But without any internal crises, do they really have any reason for being?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alan M

    In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life. To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life. To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty of humour – a story about a “cut and shut” Aston Martin had me laughing out loud. Some of Daltrey’s perspectives aren’t that surprising – like many others in their senior years (he’s now 75) he looks back longingly at the simpler times gone by, professing not to understand the modern world demands for instant gratification, although his nostalgia seems undiminished by the poverty of his upbringing. Content and comfortable with his lot now, it’s done little to take the edge off him. Witness his description of Kenney Jones drumming – and he regards Kenney as a mate! Daltrey is driven and uncompromising. Generally, not a recipe for longevity in a rock band. And yet he made it work. He was smart enough to see that Townshend was the creative genius that the band needed to take them to the very top, and as undesirable as some of their personal qualities were, Entwistle and Moon were the other elements needed to make it happen. He says more than once that he was all in – he had nothing else going. He doesn’t shy from describing the downsides of working with such dysfunctional band mates – Townsend’s lack of focus, cushioned by his publishing income, Moon’s desperate need for attention. Few surprises here although Daltrey’s reference to Entwistle’s “nasty” nature were new to me. Overall, it reads as if Daltrey put up with it all because he knew it was better than the alternative – something that it’s far from clear that the others understood. In many respects Daltrey sees himself as the outsider. Bright enough to pass the 11 plus, but alienated from his new “posh” schoolmates, he saw education as a punishment and only grasps later in life it was something he could have taken much more from. He also becomes exile in the band – fired and then grudgingly re-admitted – on probation - after laying Moon out to finish an argument about drugs. Two years of niggling windups follow, Daltrey determined not to give them the satisfaction of resolving it with his fists. All of that said looking back Daltrey sums it up “something that gets missed in all the war stories about The Who …. we respected each other”. A few things remain unremarked upon; his CBE award in 2005, The Who’s induction to the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, his album with Wilko Johnson. But beyond these details, it’s a comprehensive story, told with energy and humour. Still, a bit surprised at the book title though – “I Can Explain” surely?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Georgette

    Loved it. As much as I enjoyed Pete Townsend's memoir, Daltrey's is more down to earth and less ego than Pete's. A quick and fun read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eirini Proikaki

    O κύριος Kibblewhite απέβαλλε τον Roger Daltrey απο το σχολείο λέγοντάς του οτι δεν θα καταφέρει τίποτα στη ζωή του.Ο 15χρονος Roger είχε άλλη άποψη,πήρε την κιθάρα που είχε φτιάξει μόνος του και τράβηξε το δρόμο του. Πολύ ωραία αφήγηση.Γέλασα πάρα πολύ με τα κατορθώματα του Keith Moon και ακολούθησα την πορεία των Who απο την αρχή της μέχρι σήμερα.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ron S

    The front man for The Who tells his side of the story, in a calm and simple way as though you're hearing your grand da reminisce with a cuppa tea by the fire. Moonie and The Ox certainly led wilder lives, but then they're no longer with us, are they?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    Anyone who follows me likely knows the absurd amount of books about The Who that I read. When I saw Roger was coming out with an autobiography I immediately slammed the "put on hold at your local library" button. What else was I to do? At least I had 22 people behind me waiting for it. Nevermind there were over 10 people ahead of me. I'd get it in time. It's a shame this book didn't garner the press that Pete Townshend's book did. While both are rather good, I felt Roger Daltrey's was much mor Anyone who follows me likely knows the absurd amount of books about The Who that I read. When I saw Roger was coming out with an autobiography I immediately slammed the "put on hold at your local library" button. What else was I to do? At least I had 22 people behind me waiting for it. Nevermind there were over 10 people ahead of me. I'd get it in time. It's a shame this book didn't garner the press that Pete Townshend's book did. While both are rather good, I felt Roger Daltrey's was much more what people wanted when they wanted a Who biography. They wanted information about the band, interspersed with information about the person's life. Daltrey's book was just that, whereas Townshend's was the opposite. Both have their own merits, and I devoured both of them with a similar level of eagerness. Daltrey is just a much more accessible person than Pete. It has always been that way. Daltrey's book is a book of thankfulness. In it he talks often about his own work ethic, and there is a constant undercurrent of his knowledge of how lucky he has ultimately been. His luck comes largely from his willingness to work, to show up, to force other's into shape. Still, there is that element of luck there all the same. Miss one element of the core four members of the band and they never would have exploded onto the scene the way they did. There's a reason the hiatus post-Keith went on for as long as it did, after all. Roger knows that. And he is open from start to finish about his thoughts on it all, as he always has been. This book was a true pleasure, and optimistic from start to finish. There's always a view towards the future, and a wry smile that when he goes, he wishes to go out right. He'll be working on until his dying day, and as long as Pete is there the music will never quite end. Nevertheless, he knows the world now isn't quite what it used to be... and on that he is open as well. There was a certain cultural climate that allowed the rock and roll revolution to happen, and he explain it in a far more accessible way than most books about the band do. You get it. In short, I think this book is a great book for fans of the band and the lay-reader alike. Although obviously fans of the band will likely get a bit more out of it than others.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve Delo

    An engaging, easy and fast read. Daltrey has lived an interesting life and his narrative is refreshingly humble, honest and plainly told. Quite blunt in places, he portrays his former Who colleagues - like Keith Moon - not as gods but real people with plenty of failings and demons. It is fascinating to read Daltrey's not entirely amused take on the copious hotel carnage and on stage antics. He also makes it clear that family life is more important than work - even for a rock legend! I really enjo An engaging, easy and fast read. Daltrey has lived an interesting life and his narrative is refreshingly humble, honest and plainly told. Quite blunt in places, he portrays his former Who colleagues - like Keith Moon - not as gods but real people with plenty of failings and demons. It is fascinating to read Daltrey's not entirely amused take on the copious hotel carnage and on stage antics. He also makes it clear that family life is more important than work - even for a rock legend! I really enjoyed this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    I don't remember which family member played The Who in the early 70's, but I loved them from the first time I heard them. I memorized the words to their songs and have listened to them through good and bad albums since the first time I heard them all those years ago (although I still return to the early records when I am listening to them at home or in the car). Roger Daltrey tells an easy to follow and interesting story of how he grew up, when he knew he wanted to play music, what ensued to cre I don't remember which family member played The Who in the early 70's, but I loved them from the first time I heard them. I memorized the words to their songs and have listened to them through good and bad albums since the first time I heard them all those years ago (although I still return to the early records when I am listening to them at home or in the car). Roger Daltrey tells an easy to follow and interesting story of how he grew up, when he knew he wanted to play music, what ensued to create The Who, and the often tumultuous pathways the band took over the years. First of all, the book is a genuinely interesting and good read that is well written. The stories in the book made me keep reading and often times I found myself laughing out loud at the humor in the writing. I was hooked early on in the narrative when I found myself picturing Roger and his co-workers singing while working to the rhythm tools made during the day. I already knew a lot about The Who having been a fan for so long, yet I still learned a lot about what drove them, why they have ended up still working together, and how the complexities of each of them being SO talented ended up working for them when it could have easily ended very quickly. The fact that they are (or were) so talented is why books like this are important to read. These were four very different people who brought not only musical talent, but other talents and genius to the table as well. It was often times not easy, yet they persisted. This is a great story of leadership, compromise, creativity, growth, vision, hard work, self awareness, and fabulous music.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    A great, straightforward, and plain-spoken story, the plain truth from the guy who lived it. Refreshingly direct and free of any "literary" pretension, this was a wonderful read and is mandatory for serious Who fans. Complements Pete's book in the same unpretentious way that Dave Davies' "Kink" complemented Ray's "X-Ray." If you're looking for profound ruminations on The Meaning Of It All, or for trainspotting detail about what was happening at 6:43PM GMT on the evening of December 13, 1965, the A great, straightforward, and plain-spoken story, the plain truth from the guy who lived it. Refreshingly direct and free of any "literary" pretension, this was a wonderful read and is mandatory for serious Who fans. Complements Pete's book in the same unpretentious way that Dave Davies' "Kink" complemented Ray's "X-Ray." If you're looking for profound ruminations on The Meaning Of It All, or for trainspotting detail about what was happening at 6:43PM GMT on the evening of December 13, 1965, then look elsewhere. On the other hand, if you want to learn more about what, say, John Entwistle was *really* like in 4 or 5 pages than 99% of the corpus of Who literature has managed to get across in 5 decades, this is the book for you. Really enjoyed this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Scott Hitchcock

    I liked the Who growing up. I've long been sick of them and just about all of the classic rock genre having just heard it ad nauseum over the years. I have read about most of the other big names of that era from Zeppelin to Hendrix to Morrison.....down the line so figured it was time. This was an audiobook read by the author. I highly recommend doing it in this format. Daltrey is a great performer and really adds to the experience. He mentions Townshend has a book. I may need to read it for cont I liked the Who growing up. I've long been sick of them and just about all of the classic rock genre having just heard it ad nauseum over the years. I have read about most of the other big names of that era from Zeppelin to Hendrix to Morrison.....down the line so figured it was time. This was an audiobook read by the author. I highly recommend doing it in this format. Daltrey is a great performer and really adds to the experience. He mentions Townshend has a book. I may need to read it for contrast. Daltrey almost always has a reason why his perspective was and is still the correct one, don't we all? But I have to believe after reading some of this that his band mates often felt very different on these topics. Definitely worth the read/listen especially if you're a fan.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Norma

    ( Format : Audiobook ) "Behind blue eyes." Long time fans of the group, The Who, are used to periodic public pontificating by Pete (Townsend) but from Daltrey, not so much. In fact, hardly at all. So this is a very welcome book from the band's singer and voice of Tommy who was there from the very inception of the group fifty years ago. And because he's written it himself, his voice shines out from every page, telling his story, correcting some myths and describing his journey with the three othe ( Format : Audiobook ) "Behind blue eyes." Long time fans of the group, The Who, are used to periodic public pontificating by Pete (Townsend) but from Daltrey, not so much. In fact, hardly at all. So this is a very welcome book from the band's singer and voice of Tommy who was there from the very inception of the group fifty years ago. And because he's written it himself, his voice shines out from every page, telling his story, correcting some myths and describing his journey with the three other legends, Pete, of course, the genius behind the music, their crazy talented drummer, Keith Moon, and the bass guitarist who changed the way that instrument was played, John Entwistle. All were huge talents, all had enormous egos and it was down to Roger to hold it all together - which miraculously he did, even after the deaths of two of their number. This is a modest book from a man who not only fronted - and still continues with Pete - one of the greatest rock bands ever, but who also works hard to raise money for the Prince's Teenage Cancer Trust. There is very little name dropping even though he has played and been acquainted with many of the top stars in the industry, but when someone is mentioned, it is usually to thank them. Instead, he concentrates on personalities, his own and the others in The Who, and his general life history, no punches dodged, from growing up in the post war deprivation to his now much more comfortable life with his family. And what comes through it all most strongly, as in Michael Caine's autobiography, B!owing the Bloody Doors Off, is the dedication to hard work with singleminded pursuit of the goal combined with the love of and reliance on family. This is a quick and easy book to read. I had first purchased the hardback then saw it's availability on Audib!e. Roger Daltry narrates, his distinctive voice slightly gruff following a throat injury and life threatening illness not too long ago. It has always amazed me that someone who can belt out Pete's lyrics with such power - and, oh, that scream in Won't Get Fooled Again! - could still talk at all. But he can and his warmth in the telling of his story, with just a tinge of bitterness at times, shines through. Whilst almost identical to the text version, the audio does have occasional small differences, a word changed, a sentence ommitted, nothing much, but what isn't in the text book and is so precious is Roger's occasional burst of delighted laughter at a memory recovered. Pure magic. A must for all Who fans, this is also a book to be enjoyed by everyone: with a vibrant picture of life in the post war years, the coming of music and colour in the sixties and a story of four completely different and distinctive personalities who came, and somehow stayed, together to help change the music scene. Great stuff.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christi

    “I spent a lot of time with the disabled extras we had in the film, and they taught me a lot. I already knew from Mike Shaw how difficult life in a wheelchair could be. You just need to push someone around for a day and you realize how hard it is, and how little things make a huge difference. Things like kneeling down to talk to wheelchair users at their eye level. No one’s educated about it, are they? And because they aren’t, it creates a barrier. How hard would it be to replace one, just one, “I spent a lot of time with the disabled extras we had in the film, and they taught me a lot. I already knew from Mike Shaw how difficult life in a wheelchair could be. You just need to push someone around for a day and you realize how hard it is, and how little things make a huge difference. Things like kneeling down to talk to wheelchair users at their eye level. No one’s educated about it, are they? And because they aren’t, it creates a barrier. How hard would it be to replace one, just one, trigonometry class for a lesson run by a disabled person, explaining what would make their lives easier. Because everyone would do it. Even the toughest kids would do it. And it would make a huge difference to society.”

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ann Cooper

    No ghostwriter here! I loved this honest account of Daltrey’s life with and without The Who. I’m a long time fan and learning the background to his life with the band was illuminating. Just one thing, though, Roger. When you and your band performed Tommy at the RAH, Pete DID turn up for Acid Queen!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Roger is the best. Parts of it made my laugh, some made me cry......

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Fergus

    3.5*. Really good start. Interesting story, but flatter towards end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barry Hammond

    For a band with such a tumultuous history and one that's been written about extensively and after Pete Townsend's many interviews and his autobiography, it's nice to finally have The Who's front man and singer, Roger Daltrey, give his version of events. Needless to say, his version is quite different than some of the stories that have circulated. He endeavors to cut through the fictions and give a straightforward account from his point of view. It's a down-to-earth, meat and potatoes account wit For a band with such a tumultuous history and one that's been written about extensively and after Pete Townsend's many interviews and his autobiography, it's nice to finally have The Who's front man and singer, Roger Daltrey, give his version of events. Needless to say, his version is quite different than some of the stories that have circulated. He endeavors to cut through the fictions and give a straightforward account from his point of view. It's a down-to-earth, meat and potatoes account with a good deal of clear-sighted common sense involved. He doesn't avoid the complicated issues but tackles them straight on. This understated approach has power and can occasionally shock (such as the page where he acknowledges his four out-of-wedlock children in three tough little paragraphs). The book is tightly edited and he doesn't indulge himself in flights of fancy - just the facts as the cop in "Dragnet" used to say. It's a fast but very interesting read with both humor and pathos and a good chunk of musical history. - BH.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Linda Edmonds cerullo

    A wonderful, humorous account of the life of Roger. I finished this book in just a couple days as it was riveting, comical and at times very moving. It's sometimes hard to believe that Roger has lived as long as he has. Having grown up with the music of The Who and having read Pete Townshend's autobiography, I was anxious to read Roger's take on his years with this phenomenal band. It certainly was well worth it. From his early years in a post-war Britain filled with shortages and the wreckage o A wonderful, humorous account of the life of Roger. I finished this book in just a couple days as it was riveting, comical and at times very moving. It's sometimes hard to believe that Roger has lived as long as he has. Having grown up with the music of The Who and having read Pete Townshend's autobiography, I was anxious to read Roger's take on his years with this phenomenal band. It certainly was well worth it. From his early years in a post-war Britain filled with shortages and the wreckage of years of bombing to his rise to stardom, this is a very engaging and eye-opening memoir of a life well-lived and a man who rose to maturity in style. He is honest, frank and at times filled with regret over some of his experiences. In other words, despite the fact that he is a rock star and a very wealthy man, he is just like the rest of us. Lots to learn here, lots of laughs (especially when he recounts "Keith Moon moments") and lots of hope as well. If you come away with only one thing, that would be that you need to just "keep on keeping on".

  19. 5 out of 5

    Craig Barner

    3.5 stars Pete Townshend was my hero in The Who, but Roger Daltrey more than any other band member represented what the group stood for. He was always candid -- not arrogant and brash, but forthright. If asked for an opinion, Daltrey relayed how he saw it. He was true to his working class roots. Daltrey does the same in his memoir Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite, though the second half of the book loses a lot of energy. This mirrors the experience of the band, whose wonderful energy lost focus in th 3.5 stars Pete Townshend was my hero in The Who, but Roger Daltrey more than any other band member represented what the group stood for. He was always candid -- not arrogant and brash, but forthright. If asked for an opinion, Daltrey relayed how he saw it. He was true to his working class roots. Daltrey does the same in his memoir Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite, though the second half of the book loses a lot of energy. This mirrors the experience of the band, whose wonderful energy lost focus in the middle stages of its career. Daltrey also gets a bit repetitive in the second half. Nevertheless, his account of working class London, the battles for respect he had as a teenager, the sheet metal "shed" he worked in after expulsion from school, the skiffle band he started and that group's metamorphosis into the super group are a delight to read. One element of Daltrey's story stuck with me the most. He ended up as a vocalist for one of rock's most formidable ensembles because Daltrey found singing to be "fun". He loved singing. The roots of the mega-stud voice of The Who were in pure pleasure. For Daltrey it is tragic that few people find joy in something as simple as singing. Related to this is Daltrey's account of post-war London. People got by on nothing, yet Daltrey said he and his family were happy. He is struck by how people today have everything yet are generally miserable. Somehow out of the meagerness of post-war London, a lot of the musicians who formed the great rock bands were able to find escape and pleasure in the rebelliousness of rock. Unfortunately, those dreams of music and art usually curdled before they found true expression. Daltrey is unequivocal about the reason -- drugs. The rock movement was fueled by the dreams of escape and often derailed by the nightmare of self-indulgence in drugs and-or alcohol. This includes most of the musicians in The Who. Daltrey himself partook in illicit substances, but only reluctantly when he needed something akin to medicinal relief. His reason for avoiding drugs is direct and simple: He could not sing with power if he was high on drugs. Singing really was Daltrey's escape. Like Townshend, Daltrey depicts touring as a grind mostly because 0f drummer Keith Moon. His hotel vandalism made touring a long slog as hotels banned the group or members of it found themselves being rousted from bed after being thrown out, resulting in a sleepless night. Daltrey takes it in stride, noting that it was an opportunity for a hotel to remodel. Moon is depicted in the memoir not just a fun-loving court jester but as a desperate man. In fact, the legendary drummer almost committed suicide in one particularly harrowing night on tour. Another element that sticks out are the fights on the streets of London. Daltrey was the target of a thug's ire a couple times. He relates one dispute that could have ended his existence. Roger always stood his ground, even when it wasn't easy to do so. The Mods-and-Rockers London is based on truth. It's fun to read Daltrey's account of the his legendarily difficult relationship with Townshend. And indeed Daltrey does relate one fight that ended up with Pete being driven to the hospital after The Who's singer knocked him out, but it is clear Daltrey admires him. Multiple times, Daltrey refers to the "timelessness" of Pete's music. It was for this teenager of the 1980s.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Macke

    Honest and in some spots interesting ... I appreciate that it did not devolve into T&A and debauchery as so many do ... Mr. Daltrey seems like a stand-up guy, but the story is flat, as if told by a bystander, and the biggest bummer is that the book is not connected in any way to the songs and the music - the real reason why we read rock books in the first place

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Slack

    I’m a big The Who fan and have read several autobiographies/biographies on Pete, John, and Keith. Roger’s autobiography is a quick read. Reading about The Who I gleaned that Roger was the driving force, the level head, the pragmatist. This book confirms it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve Klemz

    Outstanding book by Daltrey. Roger comes off as a regular guy. Keith Moon does not come out quite so good. Highly recommended for fans of the Who. Others may also like a look at the music business through Roger's blue eyes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stew

    Good book Pretty well written, but could have had more intimate details of his relationships with his fellow band members. It's hard to believe that Daltrey was the straight man of the group, but he at least apparently came through it all relatively unscathed.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joe Santa Maria

    Daltry rocks! Honest, blunt, and sincere all the way through. Made me an even bigger fan, unlike the Townshend book which made me wonder how one of my favorite rock stars could be such a nitwit.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Despite some recent tone deaf comments on such topics as the metoo movement, Brexit and prison reform, I still like Roger Daltrey and I always have. In The Who, he was perhaps the least possessed of musical genius (an observation made by Pete Townshend that Daltrey notes with some sarcastic thanks, though not actually denying it) but definitely the right man for the job, and no less larger than life in his own way. While not exactly straight edge, he seems to have largely avoided the level of dr Despite some recent tone deaf comments on such topics as the metoo movement, Brexit and prison reform, I still like Roger Daltrey and I always have. In The Who, he was perhaps the least possessed of musical genius (an observation made by Pete Townshend that Daltrey notes with some sarcastic thanks, though not actually denying it) but definitely the right man for the job, and no less larger than life in his own way. While not exactly straight edge, he seems to have largely avoided the level of drink and drug consumption of Keith, John, and Pete. Daltrey's only excess seems to have been fathering children but as he notes repeatedly, he is in on good terms with all of them, even the ones given up for adoption, and apparently treats them and their moms as part of his extended family. There's a fair amount of "setting the record straight" and offering takes on various topics (Kenny Jones drumming, Keith Moon's antics, the capacity for meanness in both Entwhistle and Townshend, Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp's poor management and drug abuse, etc.) but he also seems to have a great deal of affection for all of them and doesn't seem to be much of a grudge holder. One star off for some odd editing, with a slightly off-kilter chronology (e.g. jumping from 1973 to to 1976 and then back to 1974) and a few repeated anecdotes, but overall, a satisfying rock autobiography. This is the second rock memoir I've consumed as an audiobook read by its author (the other was Kim Gordon's Girl in a Band) and it's a format I rather like.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    excellent. a great memoir of the lie and times of one of the greatest singers ever

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Very easy read. I really enjoyed the casual writing style. I would have liked to hear about a few things that were left out, such as more about Roger's solo albums and a few of his other acting jobs, but I know that wasn't the focus of the book, it was more about the The Who.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    .

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Byron Ernest

    The author of this book, Roger Daltrey, was the founder and lead singer of The Who, one of the great British bands of the ’60s and ’70s and arguably one of the most influential bands of rock and roll development. This book grabbed a hold of me right from the start and kept me engaged right to the end. I felt as though I was there for the Nazi bombing of Britain as Daltrey was born in 1944. Peacetime followed but the food rationing and lack of opportunities followed for his young childhood. Daltr The author of this book, Roger Daltrey, was the founder and lead singer of The Who, one of the great British bands of the ’60s and ’70s and arguably one of the most influential bands of rock and roll development. This book grabbed a hold of me right from the start and kept me engaged right to the end. I felt as though I was there for the Nazi bombing of Britain as Daltrey was born in 1944. Peacetime followed but the food rationing and lack of opportunities followed for his young childhood. Daltrey tells all and there are certainly lessons to be learned. One statement he made early in the book really struck me. After being expelled by the headmaster of his school, Mr. Kibblewhite, whom the book is titled after, Daltrey says, “If anyone had ever once sat me down and explained that school was for me, not the teachers or the system, and there were reasons why I should stick at it, it would have been totally different. But no one ever did” (p.21). As a leader in education this really hit me like a ton of bricks. Unfortunately, it is true that some do lose site that schools are students, not the teachers or school systems themselves. I was motivated to blog about this in School Is For The Student: https://byronernest.blog/2018/11/18/s... At the end of the book as Roger Daltrey reflects now, later in life, that his school principal was wrong to tell him he’d never do anything with his life he said: “We’re all unique. We all have our own unique lives. But seeing my life like that, I just felt overwhelmingly lucky. In the middle of this strange out-of-body experience, I said to myself, ‘Would you ever imagine the things you’ve done?’” (p. 238). Why do educators do that? Daltrey leaves us with great lessons we all can use, no matter our profession. He said, “You can’t be mediocre. A band can be either terrible or brilliant. There is no middle ground. So you have to make tough decisions.” This lesson pretty much applies to anything. Daltrey may be 74, but he’s still causing a sensation along with Pete Townshend as original members of the group who still tour. He’s also causing a stir with this great book that was released this past October, 2018. You should check it out. ~ Dr. Ernest

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tony Nielsen

    Together with guitarist Pete Townsend, bass player John Entwistle and the irrespressible drummer Keith Moon , singer Roger Daltrey introduced a version of pop and rock that rattled speakers and dislodged spider webs where-ever they played. In Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite, Daltrey tells his own story, which saw the Who become one of the biggest bands on the Planet. Mr. Kibblewhite, by the way, was the headmaster who was responsible for expelling 15 year old Daltrey, setting him on a mission to sta Together with guitarist Pete Townsend, bass player John Entwistle and the irrespressible drummer Keith Moon , singer Roger Daltrey introduced a version of pop and rock that rattled speakers and dislodged spider webs where-ever they played. In Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite, Daltrey tells his own story, which saw the Who become one of the biggest bands on the Planet. Mr. Kibblewhite, by the way, was the headmaster who was responsible for expelling 15 year old Daltrey, setting him on a mission to start a band, and to (hopefully) success. He made his first guitar but a little later his father bought him an Epiphone and he became lead guitarist for the Detours. After he had been kicked out of school he worked in a sheet metal factory by day and played music by night. When the bass player left the Detours Daltrey co-opted John Entwistle , and over the next couple of years the band line-up changed to include Pete Townsend on lead guitar, Keith Moon drums, and with Roger Daltrey now the singer. In 1964 the discovered another band was using the name the Detours, and overnight their unit became known as the Who. Their new managers Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp scored a recording deal in early 1965 with their first single "I Can't Explain'. Pete Townsend's role as the song-writer grew quickly and they exploded as one of the new bands which started dominating the charts. Daltrey's book covers the Who's story, including their penchant for violence, often directed at other members of the band, and it was also reflected in their high energy and sometimes destructive stage act. When Keith Moon died in 1978 he was replaced by Kenney Jones. In 1992 Pete Townsend effectively left the band, and in the meantime Daltrey had been in demand for acting roles and other solo projects. The Who regrouped for a 25th anniversary in 1989 and over the years since Daltrey has pursued a solo career, interspersed with Who tours. The personal experiences of Roger Daltrey in "Thanks a Lot, Mr Kibblewhite" makes one wonder how he has survived. It's one of the better rock autobiographies.

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