kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite: My Story

Availability: Ready to download

The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21 The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21st birthday,” says Roger Daltrey, the powerhouse vocalist of The Who. The result of this introspection is a remarkable memoir, instantly captivating, funny and frank, chock-full of well-earned wisdom and one-of-kind anecdotes from a raucous life that spans a tumultuous time of change in Britain and America. Born during the air bombing of London in 1944, Daltrey fought his way (literally) through school and poverty and began to assemble the band that would become The Who while working at a sheet metal factory in 1961. In Daltrey’s voice, the familiar stories—how they got into smashing up their kit, the infighting, Keith Moon’s antics—take on a new, intimate life. Also here is the creative journey through the unforgettable hits including My Generation, Substitute, Pinball Wizard, and the great albums, Who’s Next, Tommy, and Quadrophenia. Amidst all the music and mayhem, the drugs, the premature deaths, the ruined hotel rooms, Roger is our perfect narrator, remaining sober (relatively) and observant and determined to make The Who bigger and bigger. Not only his personal story, this is the definitive biography of The Who.


Compare
kode adsense disini

The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21 The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who. “It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21st birthday,” says Roger Daltrey, the powerhouse vocalist of The Who. The result of this introspection is a remarkable memoir, instantly captivating, funny and frank, chock-full of well-earned wisdom and one-of-kind anecdotes from a raucous life that spans a tumultuous time of change in Britain and America. Born during the air bombing of London in 1944, Daltrey fought his way (literally) through school and poverty and began to assemble the band that would become The Who while working at a sheet metal factory in 1961. In Daltrey’s voice, the familiar stories—how they got into smashing up their kit, the infighting, Keith Moon’s antics—take on a new, intimate life. Also here is the creative journey through the unforgettable hits including My Generation, Substitute, Pinball Wizard, and the great albums, Who’s Next, Tommy, and Quadrophenia. Amidst all the music and mayhem, the drugs, the premature deaths, the ruined hotel rooms, Roger is our perfect narrator, remaining sober (relatively) and observant and determined to make The Who bigger and bigger. Not only his personal story, this is the definitive biography of The Who.

30 review for Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite: My Story

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alan M

    In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life. To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life. To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty of humour – a story about a “cut and shut” Aston Martin had me laughing out loud. Some of Daltrey’s perspectives aren’t that surprising – like many others in their senior years (he’s now 75) he looks back longingly at the simpler times gone by, professing not to understand the modern world demands for instant gratification, although his nostalgia seems undiminished by the poverty of his upbringing. Content and comfortable with his lot now, it’s done little to take the edge off him. Witness his description of Kenney Jones drumming – and he regards Kenney as a mate! Daltrey is driven and uncompromising. Generally, not a recipe for longevity in a rock band. And yet he made it work. He was smart enough to see that Townshend was the creative genius that the band needed to take them to the very top, and as undesirable as some of their personal qualities were, Entwistle and Moon were the other elements needed to make it happen. He says more than once that he was all in – he had nothing else going. He doesn’t shy from describing the downsides of working with such dysfunctional band mates – Townsend’s lack of focus, cushioned by his publishing income, Moon’s desperate need for attention. Few surprises here although Daltrey’s reference to Entwistle’s “nasty” nature were new to me. Overall, it reads as if Daltrey put up with it all because he knew it was better than the alternative – something that it’s far from clear that the others understood. In many respects Daltrey sees himself as the outsider. Bright enough to pass the 11 plus, but alienated from his new “posh” schoolmates, he saw education as a punishment and only grasps later in life it was something he could have taken much more from. He also becomes exile in the band – fired and then grudgingly re-admitted – on probation - after laying Moon out to finish an argument about drugs. Two years of niggling windups follow, Daltrey determined not to give them the satisfaction of resolving it with his fists. All of that said looking back Daltrey sums it up “something that gets missed in all the war stories about The Who …. we respected each other”. A few things remain unremarked upon; his CBE award in 2005, The Who’s induction to the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, his album with Wilko Johnson. But beyond these details, it’s a comprehensive story, told with energy and humour. Still, a bit surprised at the book title though – “I Can Explain” surely?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ron S

    The front man for The Who tells his side of the story, in a calm and simple way as though you're hearing your grand da reminisce with a cuppa tea by the fire. Moonie and The Ox certainly led wilder lives, but then they're no longer with us, are they?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Georgette

    Loved it. As much as I enjoyed Pete Townsend's memoir, Daltrey's is more down to earth and less ego than Pete's. A quick and fun read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Norma

    ( Format : Audiobook ) "Behind blue eyes." Long time fans of the group, The Who, are used to periodic public pontificating by Pete (Townsend) but from Daltrey, not so much. In fact, hardly at all. So this is a very welcome book from the band's singer and voice of Tommy who was there from the very inception of the group fifty years ago. And because he's written it himself, his voice shines out from every page, telling his story, correcting some myths and describing his journey with the three othe ( Format : Audiobook ) "Behind blue eyes." Long time fans of the group, The Who, are used to periodic public pontificating by Pete (Townsend) but from Daltrey, not so much. In fact, hardly at all. So this is a very welcome book from the band's singer and voice of Tommy who was there from the very inception of the group fifty years ago. And because he's written it himself, his voice shines out from every page, telling his story, correcting some myths and describing his journey with the three other legends, Pete, of course, the genius behind the music, their crazy talented drummer, Keith Moon, and the bass guitarist who changed the way that instrument was played, John Entwistle. All were huge talents, all had enormous egos and it was down to Roger to hold it all together - which miraculously he did, even after the deaths of two of their number. This is a modest book from a man who not only fronted - and still continues with Pete - one of the greatest rock bands ever, but who also works hard to raise money for the Prince's Teenage Cancer Trust. There is very little name dropping even though he has played and been acquainted with many of the top stars in the industry, but when someone is mentioned, it is usually to thank them. Instead, he concentrates on personalities, his own and the others in The Who, and his general life history, no punches dodged, from growing up in the post war deprivation to his now much more comfortable life with his family. And what comes through it all most strongly, as in Michael Caine's autobiography, B!owing the Bloody Doors Off, is the dedication to hard work with singleminded pursuit of the goal combined with the love of and reliance on family. This is a quick and easy book to read. I had first purchased the hardback then saw it's availability on Audib!e. Roger Daltry narrates, his distinctive voice slightly gruff following a throat injury and life threatening illness not too long ago. It has always amazed me that someone who can belt out Pete's lyrics with such power - and, oh, that scream in Won't Get Fooled Again! - could still talk at all. But he can and his warmth in the telling of his story, with just a tinge of bitterness at times, shines through. Whilst almost identical to the text version, the audio does have occasional small differences, a word changed, a sentence ommitted, nothing much, but what isn't in the text book and is so precious is Roger's occasional burst of delighted laughter at a memory recovered. Pure magic. A must for all Who fans, this is also a book to be enjoyed by everyone: with a vibrant picture of life in the post war years, the coming of music and colour in the sixties and a story of four completely different and distinctive personalities who came, and somehow stayed, together to help change the music scene. Great stuff.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Linda Edmonds cerullo

    A wonderful, humorous account of the life of Roger. I finished this book in just a couple days as it was riveting, comical and at times very moving. It's sometimes hard to believe that Roger has lived as long as he has. Having grown up with the music of The Who and having read Pete Townshend's autobiography, I was anxious to read Roger's take on his years with this phenomenal band. It certainly was well worth it. From his early years in a post-war Britain filled with shortages and the wreckage o A wonderful, humorous account of the life of Roger. I finished this book in just a couple days as it was riveting, comical and at times very moving. It's sometimes hard to believe that Roger has lived as long as he has. Having grown up with the music of The Who and having read Pete Townshend's autobiography, I was anxious to read Roger's take on his years with this phenomenal band. It certainly was well worth it. From his early years in a post-war Britain filled with shortages and the wreckage of years of bombing to his rise to stardom, this is a very engaging and eye-opening memoir of a life well-lived and a man who rose to maturity in style. He is honest, frank and at times filled with regret over some of his experiences. In other words, despite the fact that he is a rock star and a very wealthy man, he is just like the rest of us. Lots to learn here, lots of laughs (especially when he recounts "Keith Moon moments") and lots of hope as well. If you come away with only one thing, that would be that you need to just "keep on keeping on".

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve Delo

    An engaging, easy and fast read. Daltrey has lived an interesting life and his narrative is refreshingly humble, honest and plainly told. Quite blunt in places, he portrays his former Who colleagues - like Keith Moon - not as gods but real people with plenty of failings and demons. It is fascinating to read Daltrey's not entirely amused take on the copious hotel carnage and on stage antics. He also makes it clear that family life is more important than work - even for a rock legend! I really enjo An engaging, easy and fast read. Daltrey has lived an interesting life and his narrative is refreshingly humble, honest and plainly told. Quite blunt in places, he portrays his former Who colleagues - like Keith Moon - not as gods but real people with plenty of failings and demons. It is fascinating to read Daltrey's not entirely amused take on the copious hotel carnage and on stage antics. He also makes it clear that family life is more important than work - even for a rock legend! I really enjoyed this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ann Cooper

    No ghostwriter here! I loved this honest account of Daltrey’s life with and without The Who. I’m a long time fan and learning the background to his life with the band was illuminating. Just one thing, though, Roger. When you and your band performed Tommy at the RAH, Pete DID turn up for Acid Queen!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stew

    Good book Pretty well written, but could have had more intimate details of his relationships with his fellow band members. It's hard to believe that Daltrey was the straight man of the group, but he at least apparently came through it all relatively unscathed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    excellent. a great memoir of the lie and times of one of the greatest singers ever

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    .

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Roger is the best. Parts of it made my laugh, some made me cry......

  12. 5 out of 5

    marta

    "We knew each other. We followed each other. We communicated with each other through the music. And something that gets missed in all the war stories about the Who... We respected each other." I love this band quite a lot, so when I heard that this book was coming out, I got really excited. If you're a fan of the Who you'd know from the beginning that this was going to be a completely different book from Pete's. Of course, you know, Pete wrote the songs so he has a certain way with words. Despite "We knew each other. We followed each other. We communicated with each other through the music. And something that gets missed in all the war stories about the Who... We respected each other." I love this band quite a lot, so when I heard that this book was coming out, I got really excited. If you're a fan of the Who you'd know from the beginning that this was going to be a completely different book from Pete's. Of course, you know, Pete wrote the songs so he has a certain way with words. Despite this, I didn't enjoy his book as I thought I would, it was so long and at some point to me it felt like a chore reading it (at the time I wasn't working and I remember sitting down and thinking, okay, now I won't get up until I read 50 pages). This book was the opposite: you can tell already by the page count how different these two people are. And that's one of the reasons why I love this band so much: Pete and Roger (and John and Keith before) were all people that got on each other's nerves a lot, but despite this, they loved each other a lot and stuck with each other 'til the end. And when I read Pete's book, at times I felt that he didn't pay enough respect to the other members of the Who: yes of course, he wrote pretty much all the songs but without /that/ band performing them, where would Pete be now? In this book, however, Roger doesn't hide the negative sides of all the other guys in the band but also acknowledge how important everyone else was. (Roger was the one starting the band, after all.) What I also liked it's that it feels like a long chat with an old friend of yours telling you story as they come along in his mind. That is why it feels quite genuine.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Moore

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I love the way Roger writes. I’m sure he had some editing help but he doesn’t come across as uneducated just blue collar. After reading Pete’s book a few years back I see that Roger may have put himself in a somewhat better light than the reality, but who doesn’t? It’s a little humorous and off putting to hear Roger continually bemoaning that he didn’t make much money. Admittedly the early mismanagement cost them a lot. He did offhandedly admit money is not a concern now. I like the conciseness I love the way Roger writes. I’m sure he had some editing help but he doesn’t come across as uneducated just blue collar. After reading Pete’s book a few years back I see that Roger may have put himself in a somewhat better light than the reality, but who doesn’t? It’s a little humorous and off putting to hear Roger continually bemoaning that he didn’t make much money. Admittedly the early mismanagement cost them a lot. He did offhandedly admit money is not a concern now. I like the conciseness of the book compared to Pete’s book. Less thought processes behind the stories, more interesting, humorous anecdotes. Both books stress the respect they have for each other and the two late members. Pete and Roger both marvel at how such completely different 4 individuals could form and succeed in a band and stay together as long as they did (and have). When you see Pete and Roger perform you see the respect and love they have for each other now. Any creative endeavor like this is bound to have ups and downs. All in all a fun read, highly recommended if you’re a big Who fan.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom Huguelet

    This is an immensely charming and entertaining read. Roger has a self-deprecating charm about his unique place in history, as well as a survivor's awareness. There is a fair amount of grounded perspective in this recounting. But I suspect there's also a healthy dose of reputation "burnishment" interwoven within the book. No doubt Roger is as salt-of-the-earth as any millionaire rock star, and this book makes sure we all know that. There are stories here that could only be told by a founding memb This is an immensely charming and entertaining read. Roger has a self-deprecating charm about his unique place in history, as well as a survivor's awareness. There is a fair amount of grounded perspective in this recounting. But I suspect there's also a healthy dose of reputation "burnishment" interwoven within the book. No doubt Roger is as salt-of-the-earth as any millionaire rock star, and this book makes sure we all know that. There are stories here that could only be told by a founding member of The Who, and it's worth wading through the "Disneyland version" of Mr. Daltrey that occasionally inhabits these pages - there's still plenty of the Acton street kid and quasi-hoodlum screaming through to engage.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    I read Townsend's massive memoir and thought this would be a breezy memoir that told no tales and kept everything light. After all Pete is the brains, and Roger is the front man with the awesome hair and usually no shirt. Wrong! The book was great. It glossed over things, but Roger made no apologies for anything. Pete may be the brains (and Roger is clear about this), but there is no Who today without Daltrey, and I didn't know this. Roger is very open about his life and is a great storyteller. I I read Townsend's massive memoir and thought this would be a breezy memoir that told no tales and kept everything light. After all Pete is the brains, and Roger is the front man with the awesome hair and usually no shirt. Wrong! The book was great. It glossed over things, but Roger made no apologies for anything. Pete may be the brains (and Roger is clear about this), but there is no Who today without Daltrey, and I didn't know this. Roger is very open about his life and is a great storyteller. It's a very much Pete and Roger story. There are Moon stories, but less than I thought there would be. Entwhistle doesn't get much time in the book at all. It's an above average memoir and in the upper tier of big rock autobiographies. Recommended for casual and serious Who fans.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Colyn

    As I'm a giant Who fan, I downloaded this on Audible the day it was published. I'd been looking forward to hearing Roger Daltrey narrating it and I was not disappointed. As I listened, it felt like I was being told a story, rather than read to. His growly accent makes his already compelling life story all the more entertaining, and his account of the Who's history filled in a lot of gaps for me. I didn't think it was possible to adore him more.

  17. 4 out of 5

    patty

    Fascinating — all of it, from the days of postwar austerity to the present with he and Pete still active as The Who. As much as I thought I knew about The Who, this book added many curious details about the band peppered with nonmalicious gossip. Well written too. This video of Judd Apatow interviewing Roger Daltrey is the perfect companion to the book. https://youtu.be/vUjEWR3f9AU Also, Marc Maron interviews Roger Daltrey on WTF. Check this one out too. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/w...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Fishbein

    Excellent recap of a brilliant career from my favorite singer. I liked the information about his early family life, much of which I hadn't heard before. I liked the stories about his relationships with other Who members, but with all of them would have liked more details. I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars simply because I was left feeling like this scratched the surface, and that there was a lot left unsaid.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Very easy read. I really enjoyed the casual writing style. I would have liked to hear about a few things that were left out, such as more about Roger's solo albums and a few of his other acting jobs, but I know that wasn't the focus of the book, it was more about the The Who.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Well written, funny and heartbreaking. He humbly acknowledged the high points in his life and career while honestly addressing the horrible low points.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Sailed right through this one.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stefan Fergus

    3.5*. Really good start. Interesting story, but flatter towards end.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Really good book, interesting that Roger felt like an outsider in the group for most of his life. I would have loved to see more photos though!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Little

  25. 4 out of 5

    torri marie broome

  26. 4 out of 5

    linda jackson

  27. 5 out of 5

    marco pirroni

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Harchar

  29. 5 out of 5

    T J

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angelo Leone jr.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.