kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Hope and Pride in Pakistan

Availability: Ready to download

A fearless memoir about tribal life in Pakistan--and the act of violence that inspired one ambitious young woman to pursue a life of activism and female empowerment "Khalida Brohi understands the true nature of honor. She is fearless in her pursuit of justice and equality."--Malala Yousafzai, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize From a young age, Khalida Brohi was raised to belie A fearless memoir about tribal life in Pakistan--and the act of violence that inspired one ambitious young woman to pursue a life of activism and female empowerment "Khalida Brohi understands the true nature of honor. She is fearless in her pursuit of justice and equality."--Malala Yousafzai, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize From a young age, Khalida Brohi was raised to believe in the sanctity of arranged marriage. Her mother was forced to marry a thirteen-year-old boy when she was only nine; Khalida herself was promised as a bride before she was even born. But her father refused to let her become a child bride. He was a man who believed in education, not just for himself but for his daughters, and Khalida grew up thinking she would become the first female doctor in her small village. Khalida thought her life was proceeding on an unusual track for a woman of her circumstances, but one whose path was orderly and straightforward. Everything shifted for Khalida when she found out that her beloved cousin had been murdered by her uncle in a tradition known as "honor killing." Her cousin's crime? She had fallen in love with a man who was not her betrothed. This moment ignited the spark in Khalida Brohi that inspired a globe-spanning career as an activist, beginning at the age of sixteen. From a tiny cement-roofed room in Karachi where she was allowed ten minutes of computer use per day, Brohi started a Facebook campaign that went viral. From there, she created a foundation focused on empowering the lives of women in rural communities through education and employment opportunities, while crucially working to change the minds of their male partners, fathers, and brothers. This book is the story of how Brohi, while only a girl herself, shone her light on the women and girls of Pakistan, despite the hurdles and threats she faced along the way. And ultimately, she learned that the only way to eradicate the parts of a culture she despised was to fully embrace the parts of it that she loved. Praise for I Should Have Honor "Khalida Brohi's moving story is a testament to what is possible no matter the odds. In her courageous activism and now in I Should Have Honor, Khalida gives a voice to the women and girls who are denied their own by society. This book is a true act of honor."--Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook and founder of LeanIn.Org and OptionB.Org


Compare
kode adsense disini

A fearless memoir about tribal life in Pakistan--and the act of violence that inspired one ambitious young woman to pursue a life of activism and female empowerment "Khalida Brohi understands the true nature of honor. She is fearless in her pursuit of justice and equality."--Malala Yousafzai, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize From a young age, Khalida Brohi was raised to belie A fearless memoir about tribal life in Pakistan--and the act of violence that inspired one ambitious young woman to pursue a life of activism and female empowerment "Khalida Brohi understands the true nature of honor. She is fearless in her pursuit of justice and equality."--Malala Yousafzai, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize From a young age, Khalida Brohi was raised to believe in the sanctity of arranged marriage. Her mother was forced to marry a thirteen-year-old boy when she was only nine; Khalida herself was promised as a bride before she was even born. But her father refused to let her become a child bride. He was a man who believed in education, not just for himself but for his daughters, and Khalida grew up thinking she would become the first female doctor in her small village. Khalida thought her life was proceeding on an unusual track for a woman of her circumstances, but one whose path was orderly and straightforward. Everything shifted for Khalida when she found out that her beloved cousin had been murdered by her uncle in a tradition known as "honor killing." Her cousin's crime? She had fallen in love with a man who was not her betrothed. This moment ignited the spark in Khalida Brohi that inspired a globe-spanning career as an activist, beginning at the age of sixteen. From a tiny cement-roofed room in Karachi where she was allowed ten minutes of computer use per day, Brohi started a Facebook campaign that went viral. From there, she created a foundation focused on empowering the lives of women in rural communities through education and employment opportunities, while crucially working to change the minds of their male partners, fathers, and brothers. This book is the story of how Brohi, while only a girl herself, shone her light on the women and girls of Pakistan, despite the hurdles and threats she faced along the way. And ultimately, she learned that the only way to eradicate the parts of a culture she despised was to fully embrace the parts of it that she loved. Praise for I Should Have Honor "Khalida Brohi's moving story is a testament to what is possible no matter the odds. In her courageous activism and now in I Should Have Honor, Khalida gives a voice to the women and girls who are denied their own by society. This book is a true act of honor."--Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook and founder of LeanIn.Org and OptionB.Org

30 review for I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Hope and Pride in Pakistan

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    For those of us like myself, who feel helpless to change things in their lives or their country, or those who think that one person cannot possibly make a difference, this book may change your mind. Khalida Brohi, grew up in rural Pakistan, with a very unusual father who cherished his daughters as much as his sons. Who thought education was very important, a way to move ahead in life, to open oneselves up to a wider world. So while Khalida wss allowed to be z child, playing outside after her dai For those of us like myself, who feel helpless to change things in their lives or their country, or those who think that one person cannot possibly make a difference, this book may change your mind. Khalida Brohi, grew up in rural Pakistan, with a very unusual father who cherished his daughters as much as his sons. Who thought education was very important, a way to move ahead in life, to open oneselves up to a wider world. So while Khalida wss allowed to be z child, playing outside after her daily chores, she noticed other young girls that were not. Girls married off, like her own mother had been, at too young an age, taking on adult responsibilities. It was when her cousin, a young girl of thirteen was murdered in an honor killing, that Khalida decided to work towards change. This would take her on a journey across continents, across cultural barriers, at great risk to her own health and safety. Told in a simple manner, in a very personal way, this book takes us to rural Pakistan, their families, their culture, and their beliefs. Changing people's long held beliefs, is beyond challenging, but this is one very determined young woman. What she accomplishes, where she ends up in life, is nothing short of astonishing. She makes many missteps, but is compelled to start again, often in s different way. She shows the good and the bad about the rursl tribes of Pakistan, what many of the women daily face. In a male oriented society where there are no legal protection for women, and men decide their lives from an early age. She needs to make them see that what they think of as honor can have a different meaning. A challenge for sure, but not one she steps away from. Truly remarkable and shows that yes, one person, one idea can make a difference. "I have come to see that the presence of honor, of dignity, in our lives is the strength that enables us to thrive." I think we can all do with a little more dignity and honor, regardless of the country in which we live.Sadly, nowadays it seems to be missing. ARC from Random House.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ina Cawl

    my your daughter be in house or in grave old Somali proverb " Honor is not murder. And dishonor is not a girl who goes to school. It is not a girl who plays outside. It is not a girl who refuses to marry at a young age. It is not a girl who speaks, laughs, and takes the opportunities that come in front of her. Instead, honor is identity. Honor is dignity. Honor is serving those we love with integrity and hard work; it is respecting one another, welcoming the stranger, and speaking and being proud my your daughter be in house or in grave old Somali proverb " Honor is not murder. And dishonor is not a girl who goes to school. It is not a girl who plays outside. It is not a girl who refuses to marry at a young age. It is not a girl who speaks, laughs, and takes the opportunities that come in front of her. Instead, honor is identity. Honor is dignity. Honor is serving those we love with integrity and hard work; it is respecting one another, welcoming the stranger, and speaking and being proud of your own language. It is providing for your family, striving for the best in life" before i review this book i was reminded about two honor killing incidents that occurred in my nation, luckily in the first the girl was saved before it was killed but in the second one the crime has already happens in 2017 Hoodo Mukhtaar is a women who fell in love with a man from another tribe a tribe her parents thought unworthy of her and so she escaped with her husband and returned to her parents to get their blessing but they abducted her and tortured her and if the police didn’t interfere she would definitely would be killed in 2018 women fell in love with a man from another tribe a tribe so hated and prejudiced that most Somali consider them foreigners although they in these lands for many year, the girl family responded violently to her daughter love by trying to abduct and kill her and when she didn’t the couple she captured the groom uncle and after torturing him she and other tribesmen killed him and burned him. in these two cases am sure you have noticed that what links these two cases is one word Honor this word has ruined the lives of many girls in my part of the world and forbid them from falling in love, to learn,to educate themselves and even to go outside their houses, how these honor killing came to be is unknown and still many countries see it as normal many NGO around the world are fighting this heinous crime. everyday i wake up and read news i always encountered that word Honor Killing in many Arabic newspapers although i didn’t fully absorb what that word means reading this book especially written by women showed how privileged as men i am in my patriarchal society and that i have many freedom that i didn’t appreciate that wasn’t available to females and one of these freedom includes falling in love with the one i want although these is rare its natural for men in my city to gift their daughter to men or to promise it to them before even they were born and it seems and it seems this cruel customs are not only found in my nation but its a big problem shared by many nations in the third world and this problem affects women more than men. our author was born in Balochistan which is very tribal region and while in childhood she discovered her privilege as her parents allowed her to play outside the house unlike many girls of her age who their parents forbid them from leaving outside without male partner because women reputation affects the honor of her brothers father and uncles. luckily for the author she had father who went to schools against the wishes of his parent and refused to give his daughter to marriage because of some tribal promise and he even educated his daughters against the wishes of his family, and unlike rich nations there is a little or no childhood when you live in poor countries and just as girls reach five she is expected to help her mom with house work and the boy to work with his father to earn income. in her early teenage our author the gruesome murder of her cousin as she strangled by her cousins for dishonoring them and running away with another men and this murder led her to lifelong goal of fighting this barbaric custom which kills women and its estimated to kill one thousand women in Pakistan every year interestingly education and independent income earning saved our author and will always save many women from cultural custom meant to control her

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marialyce

    4 courageous stars My reviews can be seen here: https://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpres... If ever there was a place a culture, a time where women were dominated by the men in their family, that place would probably be in Pakistan. Kahlida, as a young girl wanted the things that all the young strive for. She wanted freedom to chose her life's direction and the man she would marry, to find her own way, to be a person who did not have every hour of every day plotted out for her. She writes of the lif 4 courageous stars My reviews can be seen here: https://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpres... If ever there was a place a culture, a time where women were dominated by the men in their family, that place would probably be in Pakistan. Kahlida, as a young girl wanted the things that all the young strive for. She wanted freedom to chose her life's direction and the man she would marry, to find her own way, to be a person who did not have every hour of every day plotted out for her. She writes of the life she was destined to lead, one where women and girls were covered, one where women were controlled by men, one where a male relative literally had the power of life or death over female relatives whom were felt to dishonor the family. Fathers, uncles, brothers, cousins could and did kill their daughters when they thought these girls shamed them as Khalida learned when a cousin of hers was honor killed. The infringement could be as little as looking at a man up to running away with the man you loved. It was a brutal culture where men ruled in these tribal groups that inhabited Pakistan. Khalida was her father's beloved daughter. He was different in his approach to his daughter wanting for her an education, being educated himself, knowing it was her only way out of a life of ignorance and containment. He indulges her, educates her as best he can, always fearful of the culture which made women and girls pawns in the family. Khalida succeeds though not without many struggles as she and other fight against a culture driven by men and centuries of believing women were the chattels of their fathers, husband, and any male relative. It was a sad but inspiring story as Khalida grows to adulthood, she fights to right the wrongs of the men. Khalida loves her country, she finds it beautiful in so many ways, and it is through working with this culture, this terrain that she brings to many the ability to feel pride and eliminate fear. Recommended for those who so enjoyed My Name is Malia. This book will reinforce that we in this country are ever so fortunate to live in a culture where women are valued and free. Thank you to Khalida Brohi, Random House, and NetGalley for a copy of this admirable book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristy K

    3.5 Stars What initially drew me to this memoir was the cover: it’s stunningly beautiful and I desperately need a physical copy to grace my shelves once it’s published. But the cover is also deceiving. Because inside its pages is not flowery prose or a whimsical tale; it is a story of strength, of heartbreak, of strong will and meek upbringings and yes, of honor too. Brohi examines her life and those of her parents and others in Pakistan to expose the harsh reality that many there live with: the 3.5 Stars What initially drew me to this memoir was the cover: it’s stunningly beautiful and I desperately need a physical copy to grace my shelves once it’s published. But the cover is also deceiving. Because inside its pages is not flowery prose or a whimsical tale; it is a story of strength, of heartbreak, of strong will and meek upbringings and yes, of honor too. Brohi examines her life and those of her parents and others in Pakistan to expose the harsh reality that many there live with: the idea that women are less than. And because of their inferior place they are subject to little freedom, a lack of education and job opportunities (if any), and strict customs. But perhaps most alarming is the way they are to bring honor to their families and the consequence of any indiscretion. Brohi's life was greatly influenced by these honor killings and she rose above at a young age to make a change in her country. The dichotomy between the way author’s parents raised her and the way their culture dictated she should be raised played a strong role in the shaping of Brohi's character. She saw the sacrifices her parents made in order to give her strength and independence and she took that to create an organization to empower other Pakistani women. I loved Brohi's observation and lesson learned that you can’t just go in and change people’s whole way of life overnight. It reminded me of a book I read earlier this year where the author discussed how after the fall of the USSR his country was just suppose to become capitalist and democratic. No transition, no educating. Just a new idea forced upon them with no time for acclimation. As Brohi learned, you can’t make people change what’s been in their culture and way of life in a few days, even if those changes are right and/or for a better future.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fareya

    Powerful and heartfelt, I Should Have Honor tells the story of how a young tribal woman from Pakistan stood up against honor killing - a widely accepted tribal tradition in rural Pakistan, and struggled her way to bring justice to thousands. When Brohi's cousin gets murdered at the age of fourteen, in the name of honor, she is repulsed and sickened by the brutality and unjustness of the violence. Determined to fight against this injustice she takes out her anger and frustration by leading the f Powerful and heartfelt, I Should Have Honor tells the story of how a young tribal woman from Pakistan stood up against honor killing - a widely accepted tribal tradition in rural Pakistan, and struggled her way to bring justice to thousands. When Brohi's cousin gets murdered at the age of fourteen, in the name of honor, she is repulsed and sickened by the brutality and unjustness of the violence. Determined to fight against this injustice she takes out her anger and frustration by leading the fight against this unfairness faced by many young girls. In this brave and eye-opening memoir, Brohi talks about the struggles and injustice endured by tribal women in the name of custom and religion, and her resolute effort towards change and female empowerment. Over the years Khalida Brohi has worked as an activist, constantly striving towards her goal to end honor killings and doing everything in her power to raise awareness and provide opportunities to rural women in Pakistan helping them recognize their potential. It was heartbreaking to read about the way women are treated in certain tribal cultures, and Brohi's constant pursuit towards justice and equality is nothing less than inspiring. Recommended if you like inspirational memoirs and personal battles overcoming the odds. For more reviews visit my blog Booktimistic - Books, Outdoors & Optimism ** A free finished copy was provided by Random House. All opinions are my own**

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jill Dobbe

    I Should Have Honor tells the story of how the author fought against honor killings in Pakistan after learning early on what happens to her female friends and cousins who don't follow the centuries-old rules. Brohi gets invited to conferences around the world to speak about the inhumane practices that women have to endure-married off at early ages, beatings by their husbands, and unable to leave their homes without permission. She also attempts to change the mindsets of the tribal leaders in the I Should Have Honor tells the story of how the author fought against honor killings in Pakistan after learning early on what happens to her female friends and cousins who don't follow the centuries-old rules. Brohi gets invited to conferences around the world to speak about the inhumane practices that women have to endure-married off at early ages, beatings by their husbands, and unable to leave their homes without permission. She also attempts to change the mindsets of the tribal leaders in the villages where she grew up. Her true-to-life stories are difficult to read at times, but give a real portrayal of what it's like to be female in a Muslim and male-dominated world. Thank you Net Galley.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    2.5 I felt so many things reading this book. Anger, frustration, helplessness (hopelessness), etc. Many of things the author wrote I had already heard (or read) about. I'm not sure if she brought anything new to the table. But I tried to see things from her point of view and the points of view from others she wrote about; however, I was lost. I did not come away from reading this book enlightened. Would have liked the book to read with a better flow, with the author concentrating more on the sit 2.5 I felt so many things reading this book. Anger, frustration, helplessness (hopelessness), etc. Many of things the author wrote I had already heard (or read) about. I'm not sure if she brought anything new to the table. But I tried to see things from her point of view and the points of view from others she wrote about; however, I was lost. I did not come away from reading this book enlightened. Would have liked the book to read with a better flow, with the author concentrating more on the situations than the landscape.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Novels And Nonfiction

    https://novelsandnonfiction.com/2018/... What I Liked Learning more about the treatment of women in Pakistan. As I mentioned in the intro, I’ve been trying to educate myself about the treatment of women in those Middle Eastern countries where they are discriminated against (and neighboring countries in the region as well). I had already read Malala Yousafzai’s memoir I Am Malala about her near-fatal experience fighting for her right to be educated in Pakistan. Brohi’s memoir gave me a different le https://novelsandnonfiction.com/2018/... What I Liked Learning more about the treatment of women in Pakistan. As I mentioned in the intro, I’ve been trying to educate myself about the treatment of women in those Middle Eastern countries where they are discriminated against (and neighboring countries in the region as well). I had already read Malala Yousafzai’s memoir I Am Malala about her near-fatal experience fighting for her right to be educated in Pakistan. Brohi’s memoir gave me a different lens on many of the same ways in which women struggle to have any independence in Pakistan. Her efforts were less focused on education and more on saving women from arranged marriages as child brides, empowering them by helping them gain an income, and trying to stop them being murdered senselessly in honor killings. Subverting concept of honor. Brohi’s memoir is focused in particular on the concept of honor within her culture, and the way in which it’s bastardized through faulty reasoning that leads to the subjugation of women. Brohi wants to subvert this concept of honor from being the yoke through which women are forced to obey their families at all cost, made to hide themselves away and even be killed, back into what honor truly means. To Brohi, demonstrating honor should mean protecting your family members from harm, allowing them to follow their hearts, enabling them to fulfill their talents and aspirations and respecting them as individuals. Brohi’s personal story. In her memoir, Brohi gets very personal about her journey to independence and the struggles her family have faced. She was propelled into her career as an activist by finding out that one of her own cousins has become the victim of an honor killing. Brohi’s path to activism causes her to clash with her own family, to cross oceans in order to advocate for women’s rights, and even to find love in an unexpected way. I found it particularly interesting to read about the strong tension even Brohi experiences between her desire for independence and her familial duty. Brohi’s own father – who spurred her to pursue an education – is ambivalent in helping her when she starts to show more agency in her activism. What I Didn't Like More information on her activism. The personal focus of the memoir sometimes didn’t leave enough room to delve deeper into Brohi’s work as an activist. The reader gets broad stroke descriptions of the organization’s she’s set up in Pakistan to help women earn their own income, and through it, gain independence and respect. I really would have liked to learn more about Brohi’s organizational and practical struggle in setting up these non-profits, however. It’s clear that it must have been a nearly superhuman challenge, and I think Brohi almost sells herself short in her accomplishments by presenting it essentially as a fait accompli in her memoir. Final Verdict At its heart, this memoir is a personal story of succeeding against the odds, but it will also inform you on the discrimination experienced by women in Pakistan and inspire you to consider the true meaning of honor.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Diane Yannick

    I probably should have known about honor killings in Pakistan, but I didn’t. I did know that is a patriarchal society that believes in arranged marriages. The men had to figure out a way to punish the women who dared to disobey. This way the honor of your family could be restored. Imagine having the audacity to fall in love with someone of your own choosing. There were also planned marriage exchanges between tribes. Often daughters were promised before they were born. Thank heavens, Khalida Broh I probably should have known about honor killings in Pakistan, but I didn’t. I did know that is a patriarchal society that believes in arranged marriages. The men had to figure out a way to punish the women who dared to disobey. This way the honor of your family could be restored. Imagine having the audacity to fall in love with someone of your own choosing. There were also planned marriage exchanges between tribes. Often daughters were promised before they were born. Thank heavens, Khalida Brohi’s dad stood up for her and refused to promise her to another tribe. The book she has written is informative and gave me insight into a society that I can’t even imagine. Khalida changed women’s lives in both subtle and overt ways that made a huge difference in women’s lives and attitudes. First you have to believe that you deserving of honor. Her fearless work on behalf of women has given her many opportunities across the world to speak out. I would put Khalida on the same pedestal as I put Malala Yousafzai. Late in 2016, a law was passed in Pakistan making honor killings a crime. Here is just one incident from Sept. 24, 2018: “In another incident of honor killing, an 18 year old girl was beheaded along with her 21 year old boyfriend by her father and her uncle in a village in Attock.” (near Punjabi) There are many more current day examples. At least, punishment is finally possible, although not always meted out. I will choose this book to discuss with my book club next year.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Homeschoolmama

    I received this book as part of the early reviewers through Librarything, though it doesn't seem to be an actual ARC. It was published on Sept 4th, and this copy does seem like a final copy. I enjoyed reading Khalida's story of her fight for women's rights in Pakistan, in particular, the campaign to draw attention to the horrid practice of honor killing. Khalida is a brave woman with fierce determination and imagination. Her upbringing was unusual in that her father and mother wanted to make sur I received this book as part of the early reviewers through Librarything, though it doesn't seem to be an actual ARC. It was published on Sept 4th, and this copy does seem like a final copy. I enjoyed reading Khalida's story of her fight for women's rights in Pakistan, in particular, the campaign to draw attention to the horrid practice of honor killing. Khalida is a brave woman with fierce determination and imagination. Her upbringing was unusual in that her father and mother wanted to make sure she was educated, going against the grain of the culture. Instead of arranging marriage for Khalida when she was a child, or even before her birth, her parents adopted a more liberal approach, encouraging above all things, education. I thought the story was inspiring, but the writing was a bit too all over the place for me. The narrative style came across as very young to me, impulsive and a bit ADD. A good book overall. 3 stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This is the memoir of a young girl growing up in a tribal area of Pakistan. Khalida's father was sent to school as punishment, but instead found freedom in education. He went against his father and moved his family to Karachi so that his daughters could have an education. Khalida began to question what honor meant for her family when a cousin was murdered in an honor killing. Khalida became an activist to empower women within their tribal community. Although this was a short book, I am glad I re This is the memoir of a young girl growing up in a tribal area of Pakistan. Khalida's father was sent to school as punishment, but instead found freedom in education. He went against his father and moved his family to Karachi so that his daughters could have an education. Khalida began to question what honor meant for her family when a cousin was murdered in an honor killing. Khalida became an activist to empower women within their tribal community. Although this was a short book, I am glad I read it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marika

    Author Khalida Brohi is on a mission, a dangerous one. She was born in Pakistan to a tribal family who observes tribal customs, but she was blessed to have a father who defied those very customs. She was taught to read, and had a loving father who told her that she should have honor. While SHE had honor, she was appalled by honor killings and it is her life's mission to teach others that the old ways are not the best ways. For readers who were inspired by Malala Yousafzai and her book, 'I Am Mal Author Khalida Brohi is on a mission, a dangerous one. She was born in Pakistan to a tribal family who observes tribal customs, but she was blessed to have a father who defied those very customs. She was taught to read, and had a loving father who told her that she should have honor. While SHE had honor, she was appalled by honor killings and it is her life's mission to teach others that the old ways are not the best ways. For readers who were inspired by Malala Yousafzai and her book, 'I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban.' I read an advanced copy and was not compensated

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julie Giehl

    Brohi writes that those who sit far apart do not understand each other. Her book gives you a seat next to her and it’s a worthwhile read. As an activist fighting to end honor killings in Pakistan, she shares a personal story about how education gives her and her family a chance at a different life. Easy read and well worth the time.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aly Olson

    This book reminded me a lot of I Am Malala, which I enjoyed more. The most poignant parts of the book are when Brohi examines how honor killings were rationalized by people in her community, but I wanted more of how different people internalized these experiences and comparisons to how every culture does this with certain behaviors.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Don't recall what brought me to this book but I was excited to read this. I'm not familiar with Brohi but I am familiar with some of the topics her book discusses: arranged marriages, honor killings, cross-religious and cross-cultural relations and her mission to educate her people and country. After a couple of tough weeks I was looking forward to reading a book of a woman activist. The book is Brohi's life and work: her background, her family, how she came to move into the line of work she did Don't recall what brought me to this book but I was excited to read this. I'm not familiar with Brohi but I am familiar with some of the topics her book discusses: arranged marriages, honor killings, cross-religious and cross-cultural relations and her mission to educate her people and country. After a couple of tough weeks I was looking forward to reading a book of a woman activist. The book is Brohi's life and work: her background, her family, how she came to move into the line of work she did despite cultural/familial pressures not to do this, what happened right after, plus finding love and happiness. Initially it seemed great. I was so excited and happy to read about her her father, barely a teenager, decided not to listen to his male relatives when it was clear his bride, the author's mother, was terrified (having been married off at the age of NINE!!!!). Instead they chatted with each other all night on their wedding night and genuinely became friends. But once the author gets away from her origin story the book goes downhill. Her mother bears her first child at 13 (!) and I have to agree with other reviews that say the author doesn't really bring anything new. I applaud her work and admire how she overcame issues like cultural pressure, the lack of infrastructure, etc. but after her cousin dies it becomes more like a rote list of what the author did and her work. I think for the right readers this would definitely be a book that will resonate with some and inspire others. But I couldn't really connect with the author very much (although I could sympathize with her culture shock). I'm glad she's doing what she enjoys and did not endure the same fate of so many but I also wouldn't recommend someone rush out and read this, either. Borrowed from the library and that was the way to go for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sherie Lundmark

    This book opened my eyes to Pakistani culture. Richly steeped in tradition and honor, A culture also in many families repressive and abusive to women.. It was very refreshing and inspiring to hear the path taken by Khalida, and the support and love from her family that is still at work today trying to improve the lives of Pakistani women.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Inspiring!

  18. 4 out of 5

    RaeAnna Rekemeyer

    As a little girl, her father wanted her to be a doctor, but she grew up to heal what doctor’s cannot: a healer of souls. A tragedy that began in love lead Khalida Brohi down a road that would help her change her family, change her country, change the world, and bring her love. Read my full review at: https://onthebl.org/2018/09/07/i-shou...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Arredondo

    Beautiful cover, I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Hope and Pride in Pakistan, also great content. The story and life of Khalida Brohi, trials, tribulations, struggles to survive in a world that is not kind to women that don't follow harsh and strict rules that have been set in place for years and years and years. Author Khalida Brohi invites us into her past. Born into a tribal family with strict rules that have spanned generations. Her father...went against those customs and rules just a bit to Beautiful cover, I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Hope and Pride in Pakistan, also great content. The story and life of Khalida Brohi, trials, tribulations, struggles to survive in a world that is not kind to women that don't follow harsh and strict rules that have been set in place for years and years and years. Author Khalida Brohi invites us into her past. Born into a tribal family with strict rules that have spanned generations. Her father...went against those customs and rules just a bit to teach her daughter to read and supported her journey to receive an education. He wanted his daughter to have honor. Then the death of her cousin....an honor killing. The death of her female friends...also honor killings. We get a bit of the harshness of her world. The beatings these women face by their husbands, the harsh in justices they deal with, the rights they don't have. That was not to be the case for Brohi...but of course to change the ways of generations is not an easy one. Foundations must be set up, education but be instilled, and the fight for chance but remain prevalent. I enjoyed this book so much. I feel as a reader you will enjoy this book so much more if you go and watch Khalida Brohi's TED talk. To hear her speak..to read her words...a powerful message, an ongoing battle. Wonderful book that opens the eyes. Thanks to goodreads, Author Khalida Brohi and to Random House for my free book via giveaway. I received. I read. I reviewed this book honestly and voluntarily.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I probably have read over 30 memoirs in my life and this is the ONLY one that made me tear in the train and then at home then again at the ending and then again while writing this. As a Pakistani woman following khalida on social media, tedTalk and finally realizing she wrote a memoir made me refresh the ups track website over and over. I read the first half on my long commute to my traditional Pakistani family and her description on how her 9 years old mother wedded and her story about how her I probably have read over 30 memoirs in my life and this is the ONLY one that made me tear in the train and then at home then again at the ending and then again while writing this. As a Pakistani woman following khalida on social media, tedTalk and finally realizing she wrote a memoir made me refresh the ups track website over and over. I read the first half on my long commute to my traditional Pakistani family and her description on how her 9 years old mother wedded and her story about how her mother still remembers the first thing her 13 years old dad said made me cry tears on the public nyc train. I think the most common thing I understood from her book was her love story with David. As a late 20s single woman, I've come cross the unmarried questions from relatives and friends and feeling if finding a person that fits their idea of a perfect spouse shouldnt also be convenient as she put it in her book. I spend over 27 years trying to fit my society fit of a partner for me but why cant love just win? The type of love David has for Khalida is one of the million and reading about their love story makes me feel hopeful. Thank you Khalida. I'll be donating to your cause and will bring all my friends to the chai spot in nyc.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    I Should Have Honor I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Hope and Pride in Pakistan is Khalida Brohi’s book about two kinds of honor, the honor that is dignity, honesty, and justice, the meaning espoused in the Holy Quran, and honor killings, the horrific practice of killing women who have supposedly brought dishonor to their family by glancing at a man, choosing another man over one they are promised to, or any manner of infractions a man of the family decides upon. There are over 1,000 women killed I Should Have Honor I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Hope and Pride in Pakistan is Khalida Brohi’s book about two kinds of honor, the honor that is dignity, honesty, and justice, the meaning espoused in the Holy Quran, and honor killings, the horrific practice of killing women who have supposedly brought dishonor to their family by glancing at a man, choosing another man over one they are promised to, or any manner of infractions a man of the family decides upon. There are over 1,000 women killed each year in Pakistan in the name of honor. Khalida Brohi experiences both kinds of honor in her own family and through extreme effort and the aid of a very progressive-minded father, at a very young age she begins her work to foster change and she does. I liked the book, but to be fair, I was also a bit underwhelmed. For a woman who has achieved so much, I found the story and the writing uneven and I was left with unanswered questions, particularly concerning her programs. She spent a lot of time writing about them, but not how she did it and what they actually accomplished. All in all, a good book, but I learned more in the beginning than in the end.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nelda Brangwin

    Khalida Brohi could have her picture in a definition of courage. Born in a Pakistani family where women were valued, she experienced more freedom than most girls in her society. Yet, as she reached puberty, her options became less and she used her voice to speak out for the women of Pakistan. Using the internet and social media, as a teenager she spoke to the world about women’s rights. When scorned she continued her fight and ended up being invited to youth leadership gatherings around the worl Khalida Brohi could have her picture in a definition of courage. Born in a Pakistani family where women were valued, she experienced more freedom than most girls in her society. Yet, as she reached puberty, her options became less and she used her voice to speak out for the women of Pakistan. Using the internet and social media, as a teenager she spoke to the world about women’s rights. When scorned she continued her fight and ended up being invited to youth leadership gatherings around the world. Despite death threats she continued to help rural Pakistani women and eventually moved to the United States. No review will do her book justice. Her own words are powerful and speak courageously of the need to empower women. I can’t imagine the courage it took to apply for the funds to attend a US conference as a teenager and to survive that totally different cultural experience wanting to change the world. She never let go of her teenage ideals. She learned that change doesn’t come overnight, and she continues to fight for honor of Pakistani women today.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    What struck me most about the author Brohi was that Khalida (her first name) sounds awfully close to Claire (my given name). This memoir is recommended by Malala Yousafzai, the little girl who made waves for education a couple years ago. (I guess she's not a little girl anymore, but I remember her as the little girl in the news. Ah - Wikipedia says Malala's studying for a bachelor's in Philosophy, Politics & Economics at Oxford right now.) This book discussed some disturbing topics and explai What struck me most about the author Brohi was that Khalida (her first name) sounds awfully close to Claire (my given name). This memoir is recommended by Malala Yousafzai, the little girl who made waves for education a couple years ago. (I guess she's not a little girl anymore, but I remember her as the little girl in the news. Ah - Wikipedia says Malala's studying for a bachelor's in Philosophy, Politics & Economics at Oxford right now.) This book discussed some disturbing topics and explains why this lady pursues activism and female empowerment. You should read it. It's a slightly different perspective on fighting against death from another person who has had seizures and went to the hospital but they didn't have enough resources to treat her condition. But she lived to tell the tale. It's quite the page-turner. Go ahead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    K.H. Leigh

    Powerful and personal. Brohi's strongest accomplishment with this book is the clear distinction she makes between her culture and the barbarism that threatens to destroy it from within. She strongly conveys that, despite our outsiders' perception, the rampant violence against women in Pakistan is not part of the culture itself, but a cancer that infects it. It is a disease, and like any disease it must be identified, treated, cut out, cured. The country, the people, the religion, are not the dis Powerful and personal. Brohi's strongest accomplishment with this book is the clear distinction she makes between her culture and the barbarism that threatens to destroy it from within. She strongly conveys that, despite our outsiders' perception, the rampant violence against women in Pakistan is not part of the culture itself, but a cancer that infects it. It is a disease, and like any disease it must be identified, treated, cut out, cured. The country, the people, the religion, are not the disease. They do not deserve to be categorically dismissed because of the illness that plagues them. Instead, they deserve to be loved, and cared for. They deserve to be cured, so that their history and tradition can continue and their future can be strengthened. And with women like Khalida Brohi leading the way, they will be.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Wood

    Full Overview, Review and Commentary over on my blog - https://girlwithnoselfie.com/i-should... “Even if I have nothing, I should have honor.” Brohi’s memoir examines her family’s upbringing, her own life, tribal living, Pakistan and how she sought to end “honor killings” after her cousin was murdered in that same centuries-old tradition. Her story is one of determination, and strength but also one of enlightenment if you are not familiar with life in Pakistani life. I SHOULD HAVE HONOR is a timely Full Overview, Review and Commentary over on my blog - https://girlwithnoselfie.com/i-should... “Even if I have nothing, I should have honor.” Brohi’s memoir examines her family’s upbringing, her own life, tribal living, Pakistan and how she sought to end “honor killings” after her cousin was murdered in that same centuries-old tradition. Her story is one of determination, and strength but also one of enlightenment if you are not familiar with life in Pakistani life. I SHOULD HAVE HONOR is a timely novel that confirms that real lasting change takes time, requires education, and meeting people exactly where they are. This is a lesson that can be applied across the board when it comes to solving problems in the world today. You will feel many emotions reading this book, but the ending is one of hope.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie Newcomb

    I cannot stress enough how eye opening and important this book is. Khalida is a gift to the world. Though the content of this book can be extremely heavy, it is written in a way that is extremely digestible (despite the disturbing content.) This could easily be read by someone with a middle school reading level (which in my opinion is a good thing for a book that should be widely distributed.) Khalida incorporates humor when appropriate. I laughed out loud when I read that she thought Oprah live I cannot stress enough how eye opening and important this book is. Khalida is a gift to the world. Though the content of this book can be extremely heavy, it is written in a way that is extremely digestible (despite the disturbing content.) This could easily be read by someone with a middle school reading level (which in my opinion is a good thing for a book that should be widely distributed.) Khalida incorporates humor when appropriate. I laughed out loud when I read that she thought Oprah lived in the Sydney Opera House for nearly a decade, until she actually met Oprah herself! I am so inspired by Khalida, her loyalty to her tribe, and her courage to push societal boundaries.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    In this memoir, Khalida Brohi tells her story of growing up female in Pakistan. Parts of her story are familiar to those who have read stories of life as a girl in a Muslim culture. One aspect of Khalida's story that is different is support she receives from her father. I consider this a light-weight version of the challenges a woman faces growing up in this culture. There was a little bit of a magical feel to her story as suddenly (it seemed to me) Khalida was speaking in Los Angeles or appearin In this memoir, Khalida Brohi tells her story of growing up female in Pakistan. Parts of her story are familiar to those who have read stories of life as a girl in a Muslim culture. One aspect of Khalida's story that is different is support she receives from her father. I consider this a light-weight version of the challenges a woman faces growing up in this culture. There was a little bit of a magical feel to her story as suddenly (it seemed to me) Khalida was speaking in Los Angeles or appearing on a panel in an Ivy League school. So I would recommend it to the reader who is beginning to read true stories like this.

  28. 5 out of 5

    S

    I was intrigued by the cover of this book and the title. But once I started reading this memoir it was captivating yet heartbreaking . Being from the same country as the author and knowing how honor killing is part of culture in some parts of the country. Not experiencing anything like this it was truly an eye opening experience and at times sad at how some people in the same country our living with such orthodox mentality where as for us who are blessed to live in big cities don’t have to deal I was intrigued by the cover of this book and the title. But once I started reading this memoir it was captivating yet heartbreaking . Being from the same country as the author and knowing how honor killing is part of culture in some parts of the country. Not experiencing anything like this it was truly an eye opening experience and at times sad at how some people in the same country our living with such orthodox mentality where as for us who are blessed to live in big cities don’t have to deal with these nuances . The author was lucky to have have fought with her circumstances. It’s a sad reality of how women are treated specially in these tribal areas .

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve and Tanya Panella

    As a read the book is easy, simple, yet descriptive. As as a story it is amazing. What the author has accomplished for herself, her community, and in a ripple effect for the world tremendous. What Brohi has accomplished is inspiring, especially from such humble beginnings and against so many obstacles. Its especially encouraging to read what empathy, selflessness and determination can accomplish and perhaps we can overcome what we are faced now with so much selfishness, greed and lies in America As a read the book is easy, simple, yet descriptive. As as a story it is amazing. What the author has accomplished for herself, her community, and in a ripple effect for the world tremendous. What Brohi has accomplished is inspiring, especially from such humble beginnings and against so many obstacles. Its especially encouraging to read what empathy, selflessness and determination can accomplish and perhaps we can overcome what we are faced now with so much selfishness, greed and lies in American society. With more people like Brohi we may turn out OK.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Penny

    A quick and easy read, a memoir somewhat reminiscent of Malala, of a young Balochi girl, Khalida, encouraged to get educated by her father, and who becomes enmeshed with the whole system of honour killings in Pakistan after her uncle has her cousin killed for falling in love to a man she was not betrothed to. Her youth sometimes leads her to impulsivity, but her intentions are always right, and she is able to encourage many in her community and beyond, even to countries overseas, to think of hon A quick and easy read, a memoir somewhat reminiscent of Malala, of a young Balochi girl, Khalida, encouraged to get educated by her father, and who becomes enmeshed with the whole system of honour killings in Pakistan after her uncle has her cousin killed for falling in love to a man she was not betrothed to. Her youth sometimes leads her to impulsivity, but her intentions are always right, and she is able to encourage many in her community and beyond, even to countries overseas, to think of honour in a different way.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.