kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

A Conspiracy of Truths

Availability: Ready to download

In a bleak, far-northern land, a wandering storyteller is arrested on charges of witchcraft. Though Chant protests his innocence, he is condemned not only as a witch, but a spy. His only chance to save himself rests with the skills he has honed for decades – tell a good story, catch and hold their attention, or die. But the attention he catches is that of the five elected r In a bleak, far-northern land, a wandering storyteller is arrested on charges of witchcraft. Though Chant protests his innocence, he is condemned not only as a witch, but a spy. His only chance to save himself rests with the skills he has honed for decades – tell a good story, catch and hold their attention, or die. But the attention he catches is that of the five elected rulers of the country, and Chant finds himself caught in a tangled, corrupt political game which began long before he ever arrived here. As he’s snatched from one Queen’s grasp to another’s, he realizes that he could either be a pawn for one of them… or a player in his own right. After all, he knows better than anyone how powerful the right story can be: Powerful enough to save a life, certainly. Perhaps even powerful enough to bring a nation to its knees. ("Fanfic"-style tags for this book can be found here: https://twitter.com/_alexrowland/stat... (May contain very slight spoilers))


Compare
kode adsense disini

In a bleak, far-northern land, a wandering storyteller is arrested on charges of witchcraft. Though Chant protests his innocence, he is condemned not only as a witch, but a spy. His only chance to save himself rests with the skills he has honed for decades – tell a good story, catch and hold their attention, or die. But the attention he catches is that of the five elected r In a bleak, far-northern land, a wandering storyteller is arrested on charges of witchcraft. Though Chant protests his innocence, he is condemned not only as a witch, but a spy. His only chance to save himself rests with the skills he has honed for decades – tell a good story, catch and hold their attention, or die. But the attention he catches is that of the five elected rulers of the country, and Chant finds himself caught in a tangled, corrupt political game which began long before he ever arrived here. As he’s snatched from one Queen’s grasp to another’s, he realizes that he could either be a pawn for one of them… or a player in his own right. After all, he knows better than anyone how powerful the right story can be: Powerful enough to save a life, certainly. Perhaps even powerful enough to bring a nation to its knees. ("Fanfic"-style tags for this book can be found here: https://twitter.com/_alexrowland/stat... (May contain very slight spoilers))

30 review for A Conspiracy of Truths

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    A Conspiracy of Truths is a story about people and what makes them tick. And it's a story about stories. And it's a story about stories that tell you what makes people tick. And if you love stories (I mean, you're reading this, aren't you?) Rowland's debut is one you should not miss out on. Admittedly, the book wasn't quite what I was expecting. I went into it anticipating something similar to 1001 Nights and In the Night Garden--something whimsical and fantastical--and it took me a while to adju A Conspiracy of Truths is a story about people and what makes them tick. And it's a story about stories. And it's a story about stories that tell you what makes people tick. And if you love stories (I mean, you're reading this, aren't you?) Rowland's debut is one you should not miss out on. Admittedly, the book wasn't quite what I was expecting. I went into it anticipating something similar to 1001 Nights and In the Night Garden--something whimsical and fantastical--and it took me a while to adjust to the fact that A Conspiracy of Truths is an entirely different beast. That's not to say there aren't stories within stories in this book (or that they're not fantastical). We get more than a dozen of them and they serve many purposes: they're used to educate a person on a subject, to deceive and coerce, or to simply pass the time. But the book is less about the stories themselves and more about their...anatomy. The shape of them. While the content of the stories are important, they're not quite as important as what they say about the storyteller and the storyreceiver. How they're told, how they're interpreted, how they're reacted to--all of that can tell you so much of a person and that's the beauty of stories. A Conspiracy of Truths is the ultimate love letter to stories and the idea that people--all people--are pattern finders. The way we look for meaning in chaos, draw through random dots, seeing pictures and creating stories out of them. And sometimes such stories have the power to upturn nations. It takes a stronger soul than me to not fall headlong in love with a message like that. Okay, enough vague gushing. Let's get to the meat of it. Our story begins when Chant--our illustrious, elderly, cantankerous storyteller--gets arrested and charged with witchcraft, espionage, and brazen impertinence while passing through Nuryevet, a country where polyamory is the norm, the government divided into five Queens and Kings, and nearly everything requires the signing of paperwork (including visits to the brothel). Chant soon discovers that Nureyviet is rotten to the core with all manner of corruption--assassinations, nepotism, bribery. Things he wouldn't normally give a toss about, but with his neck on the line and his execution date drawing near, he realizes that to save himself he must first save this country from itself. What can a 70-year old man do from the confines of a cell, you may ask? Well, Chant isn't without allies. In his corner he's got one very reluctant but talented advocate; one kindhearted, though a tad naive, apprentice; said apprentice's boyfriend (who has very beautiful handwriting); and of course, the greatest weapon at his disposal--his stories. Chant isn't an easy character to like and he knows it. While undoubtedly entertaining, I found his fiery personality somewhat exhausting in the beginning. But then he started growing on me, and at some point he went from grating on my nerves to pulling at my heartstrings and plastering a grin on my face. I don't know when it happened, but I do know why. It's his love of stories and understanding of the human heart that ultimately won me over, and by the end I would have happily fought Ylfing for the apprentice position. Speaking of which, his relationship with Ylfing was hands-down my favourite part of the book. The teenager's sweet and unassuming personality contrasts so wonderfully with Chant's grumpy cynicism, and despite all of Chant's "I don't care" attitude, the love shared between them is palpable. Their scenes range from hilarious to intellectually provocative to tear-jerking and I would gladly read five more books about their adventures. Aside from Ylfing, most of the side characters in the story are women. Diverse women. Women who are flawed and decidedly not nice. Women who stand up for what they believe is right even if it means losing everything else. Soldiers, lawyers, politicians, mothers--Rowland gives a platform for all, which is so gratifying to see in a fantasy novel. The side characters also serve as Chant's eyes and ears. A story has no right to be this entertaining when its narrator spends most of his time locked up in cells, but at no point does it feel claustrophobic. These characters constantly come and go carrying news and stories and just the sheer magnetism of their personalities, and you soon forget that you barely know what this country even looks like. Plot-wise, it's a lot more politics-heavy than I'd expected. You get thrown a lot of names and info from the get-go and it took me a good 1/3 of the book to get settled into it. But from then on I was fully hooked. I'm pretty sure my initial disengagement has to do with my shoddy memory and lack of note-taking, so a word of advice: write notes on the key political players as they come up. There are books that make you ponder the nature of humans. There are books that have you on the edge of your seat, brows furrowed and biting your nails. And there are books that leaves you smiling and feeling good about the world. And this book? This book manages all three. Review copy provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lauren James

    An old man is trapped in prison, accused of witchcraft. An old man who has spent his life learning how to tell stories, and manipulate perceptions. An old man who will do anything to get free. An old man, who single-handedley manages to take down an entire government from a prison cell.....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    4.0 out of 5 stars Based on the book cover and description alone, I was expecting this to be a deadly serious high fantasy tale. What greeted me instead was an unexpectedly delightful story featuring a wonderfully eccentric narrator named Chant. Chant is an irascible traveling raconteur with a sharp tongue who tells stories to anyone who lends a year (and some who don’t). These stories are presented as interludes interspersed throughout the book — most come from Chant’s voice, but some are tales t 4.0 out of 5 stars Based on the book cover and description alone, I was expecting this to be a deadly serious high fantasy tale. What greeted me instead was an unexpectedly delightful story featuring a wonderfully eccentric narrator named Chant. Chant is an irascible traveling raconteur with a sharp tongue who tells stories to anyone who lends a year (and some who don’t). These stories are presented as interludes interspersed throughout the book — most come from Chant’s voice, but some are tales told to him from others. Each story is complete with Chant’s internal monologue criticizing haphazard storytelling techniques or adding footnotes and flair to his own words. Chant presents as an omniscient presence who understands so much about the world but he struggles to grapple with his own emotions. He would rather believe that he’s having a heart attack than feeling excited or that his face is sweating rather than tearing up. It’s a fun personality quirk that adds some depth to what could’ve been a straightforward, one-note character. I wasn’t consistently sucked into the overall plot nor did I always understand the court hierarchies and politics at play, but this is The Chant Show, pure and simple — the story flowed beautifully from him and out into the world. When writing a book about a gifted storyteller, it helps to be a gifted storyteller. Luckily, author Alexandra Rowland shows a knack for spinning a charming and heartwarming yarn. A Conspiracy of Truths is an impressive and enchanting novel that was a joy to read. I hope to read Rowland’s subsequent works and perhaps more about Chant’s past and future adventures, as well. My thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review. See this review and others at The Speculative Shelf.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Mace

    Take one desperate, curmudgeonly old storyteller on trial for witchcraft. Add one undermotivated and deeply unimpressed lawyer who just wants to go home to her wives and husband. Pepper with a sprinkling of paranoid, trigger-happy nominally-elected fantasy despots and stir vigorously with the aide of some, shall we say, 'creative' storytelling. Garnish with the softest, most precious apprentice to never deserve the disaster about to befall him and everyone he cares about - and now you have A Con Take one desperate, curmudgeonly old storyteller on trial for witchcraft. Add one undermotivated and deeply unimpressed lawyer who just wants to go home to her wives and husband. Pepper with a sprinkling of paranoid, trigger-happy nominally-elected fantasy despots and stir vigorously with the aide of some, shall we say, 'creative' storytelling. Garnish with the softest, most precious apprentice to never deserve the disaster about to befall him and everyone he cares about - and now you have A Conspiracy of Truths. I can't possibly convey the gems hidden between these covers - go read the sample pages, and you'll get a glimpse of what I mean. Chant's voice is incorrigible and impossible to put down. His foes are, by turns, ridiculous and terrifying. The consequences of his actions are chilling and the way his stories spiral out of his control is a terrifying reflection of our own society. The stories themselves are perfect jewels of fairytale, at once alien and somehow deeply familiar. And every single character has a heart and a core that leaps off the page. Put your hours in Rowland's hands. You won't regret it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Abi Walton

    What a wonderful book. I have wanted to read this Novel for ages and was so excited when it arrived on my doorstep. This book is beautiful! It's about the power of storytelling and how magical tales are. Our protagonist, Chant, is an old travelling storyteller who earns his way through his knowledge of people, myth and legend. I read Rowland's "In The End" and instantly knew I was going to adore "A Conspiracy of Truths. Rowland's writing style is lyrical, fascinating and driven by characterisati What a wonderful book. I have wanted to read this Novel for ages and was so excited when it arrived on my doorstep. This book is beautiful! It's about the power of storytelling and how magical tales are. Our protagonist, Chant, is an old travelling storyteller who earns his way through his knowledge of people, myth and legend. I read Rowland's "In The End" and instantly knew I was going to adore "A Conspiracy of Truths. Rowland's writing style is lyrical, fascinating and driven by characterisation which I have always loved. The Worldbuilding is captivating and Beautiful and has left me desperately wanting more. I cannot wait to see where Rowland takes this series (?). I am left desperately wanting to see more of these characters and wondering if maybe Ylfing will be our next protagonist as he becomes his own traveller and Chant?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Freya Marske

    I got to sink my teeth into an ARC of this one courtesy of (disclaimer) MY DEAR FRIEND ALEX, who has written a joyfully layered and frequently hilarious story about stories. And about storytellers. And about the power of narrative to alter reality, and what happens when one person wielding that power out of sheer survival instinct sets off a chain of events that takes apart a nation. The sheer amount of imagination and attention to worldbuilding detail in this made me want to weep with jealousy, I got to sink my teeth into an ARC of this one courtesy of (disclaimer) MY DEAR FRIEND ALEX, who has written a joyfully layered and frequently hilarious story about stories. And about storytellers. And about the power of narrative to alter reality, and what happens when one person wielding that power out of sheer survival instinct sets off a chain of events that takes apart a nation. The sheer amount of imagination and attention to worldbuilding detail in this made me want to weep with jealousy, and the style of narration is so irreverent and fun (and unreliable) that it pulled me along effortlessly. I had a great time listening to Chant spin me this particular tale, and I suspect you will too.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Felicia Davin

    This is a fantasy novel about the power of storytelling--the main character, Chant, is a wandering storyteller who gets wrongfully arrested and then sets about bringing down the government of the entire country from inside his prison cell. The narration is wry and engaging, the characters are complex and real, and I loved all of the embedded tales. The worldbuilding in this book is absolutely superb. Also, one of the embedded tales has a central plot point about historical phonology, and that won This is a fantasy novel about the power of storytelling--the main character, Chant, is a wandering storyteller who gets wrongfully arrested and then sets about bringing down the government of the entire country from inside his prison cell. The narration is wry and engaging, the characters are complex and real, and I loved all of the embedded tales. The worldbuilding in this book is absolutely superb. Also, one of the embedded tales has a central plot point about historical phonology, and that won my nerd heart forever.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lawrence

    Just brilliantly done. I'll post my finished review when I am able, but goodness if you enjoy folklore, political intrigue, watching the power of stories in action, sarcastic narrators, definitely give this a go.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alyshondra

    Ok. This book. You know when you are tootling along, enjoying a book, appreciating the craft and the snarkiness when all of a sudden you realize that this book has worked it’s way inside of you to be written on your bones? It happens slowly, without noticing, and then you just have to stop for a minute and take a breath and appreciate how this book is now just a part of you. That is A Conspiracy of Truth for me. The stories Chant (and others!) tell are amazing. We get a feel for the whole wide wo Ok. This book. You know when you are tootling along, enjoying a book, appreciating the craft and the snarkiness when all of a sudden you realize that this book has worked it’s way inside of you to be written on your bones? It happens slowly, without noticing, and then you just have to stop for a minute and take a breath and appreciate how this book is now just a part of you. That is A Conspiracy of Truth for me. The stories Chant (and others!) tell are amazing. We get a feel for the whole wide world, even though it’s set in this one city. There are legends and creation myths and silly joke tales and tales with poetry and riddles. Everyone tells with a different voice. My favorite (can I even pick?) is the creation myth. The range of female characters in this is just FANTASTIC. Women are all sorts of people, and it is SO GOOD. ALSO: Visible galaxy and two moons in the sky. I swoon for thought-out astronomy. NOT TO MENTION the actual cinnamon roll too good and pure for this world. Still mad we have to wait ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY THREE PAGES to meet him. The author created fanfic style tags that you can see on their website: https://www.alexandrarowland.net/. This delights me, and I want more authors to do this please. There is SO MUCH MORE, but I want you to experience it yourself. Go and read. I got an ARC, cause I am very lucky.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amelia L. Kinch

    From the first line of the book, Chant takes your hand and guides you into a world unlike anything you’ve ever seen before. It stops being a thing-you-are-reading and starts being an active experience. It feels like you get to live this book in real time alongside Chant. There’s no excruciating slow build, no dry exposition. You take one step in and it’s like you’ve come home to an old friend. On a more literary note, A Conspiracy of Truths takes a look at classic storytelling elements and chall From the first line of the book, Chant takes your hand and guides you into a world unlike anything you’ve ever seen before. It stops being a thing-you-are-reading and starts being an active experience. It feels like you get to live this book in real time alongside Chant. There’s no excruciating slow build, no dry exposition. You take one step in and it’s like you’ve come home to an old friend. On a more literary note, A Conspiracy of Truths takes a look at classic storytelling elements and challenges them to go bigger. It reminds readers that we haven’t--nor will we ever--reach the limits of what fantasy can be. All of the above is a very flowy and fancy way of saying that Alex Rowland assembled an amalgam of tired and overused tropes, brought it to life, then challenged it to a knife fight in a Denny’s parking lot. The result is fucking awesome. This book had me laughing so hard that the cats started refusing to sit next to me as I was reading, and crying so hard my spouse woke up at 3AM to come ask me if I was okay. I hadn’t put the book down since I’d intended to “just read one chapter” at 10PM. I ended up finishing the whole damn thing in one sitting. As a demi and non-binary author, Alex Rowland is fiercely dedicated to fighting the old classics of “we have one (1) woman character and she’s super hot,” or who could forget “people of colour weren’t invented until about ten (10) years ago.” The main character is a curmudgeonly older black man with a wicked sense of humour and a razor sharp tongue. His apprentice is a young gay man whose capacity for love and kindness belong in a Pixar movie. His lawyer is a bisexual, polyamorous, middle aged woman who loves her three spouses, her kids, and is 50 shades of done with Chant’s bullshit. There is an asexual character, a character with disabilities, a dyslexic character… And that’s just stuff I can think of off the top of my head. It’s not gimmicky, either! It doesn’t feel like pandering. It's woven in as part of what makes the world so vibrant and different from ours. It isn't a point of angst or contention. It's just as normal as the bioluminescent fish that are described so beautifully that I got sad when I remembered they aren’t real. I hesitate to remark on any plot details in an effort to not spoil the experience, but I compiled a short list of things I can tell you: 1. You are going to fall in love with Ylfing. It’s as inevitable as the tide rising and falling. 2. There is no one more relatable than motherfucking Consanza. A true icon of a woman. 3. The author has confirmed on social media that dragons exist in this universe. This is neither important, relevant, nor useful to the reading of A Conspiracy of Truths, but it is a massive selling point (in my humble opinion.) A Conspiracy of Truths is a story about the importance of stories. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever read before. It’s the first book I’ve ever loved so intensely that I felt compelled to grab a soapbox and yell into the internet customer review void about just how much I love it. It’s roundhouse kicked books I’ve treasured for decades out of the rankings to sit proudly on top as the chosen favourite. It reminded me why I love fantasy in the first place. I’m worried that I’m going to reach the text limit of Amazon reviews, so I’ll wrap it up with this: To Mx. Alex Rowland: Thank you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    Damn, this sounds awesome! A storyteller as the main character, love it and that coverrrr 😍

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marzie

    This book is just a sheer delight. As I told Alex Can Read who steered me to this book, I laughed so often that it was a tonic in these dark times. A Conspiracy of Truths is about a storyteller and his stories within his larger story, like the famed Arabian Nights or Catherynne Valente's The Orphan's Tales. We have a cantankerous old storyteller who we can call Chant (a title, not a name, and you're not getting a name because for religious reasons he won't tell you so don't bother asking, you in This book is just a sheer delight. As I told Alex Can Read who steered me to this book, I laughed so often that it was a tonic in these dark times. A Conspiracy of Truths is about a storyteller and his stories within his larger story, like the famed Arabian Nights or Catherynne Valente's The Orphan's Tales. We have a cantankerous old storyteller who we can call Chant (a title, not a name, and you're not getting a name because for religious reasons he won't tell you so don't bother asking, you insolent cur because it's none of your business) who has been charged with black witchcraft. Well, that and brazen impertinence. (Yes, that's a charge.) Oh, and the espionage charge, because hanging out with pirates and spies, while great for your storytelling archive, is probably ill-advised if you plan to go to Nuryevet. Frankly, I'd really suggest you avoid going to Nuryevet. But, okay, if you're reading this book, you're effectively there. Watch out for the Queens. The Queen of Justice, the Queen of Pattern... wait, Queen of Secrets? (Do Secrets have Patterns?) Then there's the Queen of Order and the Queen of Coin...Wait, no... Queen of Gold? Penny Queen? Dragon Queen? (scary!) These are all mostly elected positions, by the by. And as in any political system there are fights for power, position, dominance, information, and oh, you get it. Poor Chant. They fight over Chant. What does he know? So much, but some of it is embedded in stories. He must be hiding something. Is he a spy? A blackwitch? His public defender Consanza is all but useless, preoccupied, a seeming narcissist. She's never lost a case before the Court of Justice. Will Chant's be the first if she keeps his case? And Yfling, Chant's young and kind apprentice... gosh knows how he will fare in this den of political wolves. Poor boy will probably end in tears. Tears of joy? Tears of relief? So look, this book is worth your time but just keep your cards close to your chest. Don't mention who you know and spent time sailing with, or anything you might have heard about royalty in other courts, or anything you know about border skirmishes, or really just... just shut up and read. Or listen. Because I waited to listen to the start of the newly released audiobook and it's super. If you ever wanted a story in which you could imagine a totally snarky character like Elliot from In Other Lands grew up and grew old after visiting all the border and other lands and had a bunch of allegorical stories and intrigue to share, this is your book. And if you don't want to read a story with snarky, cantankerous characters, shame on you! What are you thinking?! P.S. A Story Over the summer I attended a WorldCon Kaffeeklatsch hosted by Saga editor Navah Wolfe. Navah described what she was looking for when she looks at submissions. She described a situation in which a book, no matter how weird (you mean like seventy-something snarky and cursing protagonist who is charged with multiple trumped up crimes?) just GRABS YOU. Yep. I see what she means by that... I received a Digital Review Copy of this book from Saga Press via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aster Marks

    OH MAN! This book is so freaking good. Like, edge of your seat, yelling at the main character, worrying out lout to your friends good. This book grabs you by the collar from the very first page and proceeds to drag you on an adventure through political intrigue, amazing stories, and a very sweet boy who deserves the best. Things I Love About This Book: - Chant. Everything about him as a narrator pushes this book forward. The whole story is being told orally, which can be distracting in some cases, OH MAN! This book is so freaking good. Like, edge of your seat, yelling at the main character, worrying out lout to your friends good. This book grabs you by the collar from the very first page and proceeds to drag you on an adventure through political intrigue, amazing stories, and a very sweet boy who deserves the best. Things I Love About This Book: - Chant. Everything about him as a narrator pushes this book forward. The whole story is being told orally, which can be distracting in some cases, but works perfectly with the tone and themes of this book. - Ylfing. My sweet, wonderful baby. I have no coherent words about his amazingness. Instead, I shall offer my incoherent wails of how he deserves a boy who will treat him right. - The Stories. This book is full of stories-within-a-story. Rowland has a firm grasp on how to worldbuild, and offers many cultures, all with mythos so rich you could reach out and grab them. So many good stories that all push the story forward, but even if they didn't, you should still read them because they're so seamlessly worked in. - The Voice. Rowland has such a strong grasp on how to write a diverse cast of characters, each of whom has their own voice. Stories take on a wild, almost lofty tone, full of wonder. Characters each have their own habits, voices, and are so 3D you expect them to jump off the page. Things I Loved Slightly Less: - Some things are slightly confusing on a first readthrough. It took me a few reads to understand every reference, which is fun, but can slightly pull you out of the immersion of the story. Some things about the world aren't immediately obvious and are never explained(view spoiler)[, like the degrees of crime (hide spoiler)] but they're minor and only noticeable if you really pick the book apart. - The names of the Queens were, at least to me, easily confused on a first readthrough, but this could well have had to do with the speed I was trying to read the book with. On subsequent reads, they were much easier to keep separate. Overall, an amazing read, with amazing plot and amazing characters. Please read this book and then scream about it with me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    The worldbuilding in this book is SO FREAKING GOOD. I want to explore this world with the same fervency I have generally reserved for Pat Rothfuss’s fantasy world. Can I just live in Alex’s world forever and hear lots of good stories? GOD give me all the folk tales and all the cultures and customs. They’re all so distinct and wonderful and I’m sitting here pouting like a freaking toddler because I want MORE. I found everything super charming, especially the idea of a fantasy bureaucracy. The char The worldbuilding in this book is SO FREAKING GOOD. I want to explore this world with the same fervency I have generally reserved for Pat Rothfuss’s fantasy world. Can I just live in Alex’s world forever and hear lots of good stories? GOD give me all the folk tales and all the cultures and customs. They’re all so distinct and wonderful and I’m sitting here pouting like a freaking toddler because I want MORE. I found everything super charming, especially the idea of a fantasy bureaucracy. The characters were amazing and even though the narrator was a dude, there was a bounty of amazing women in this story which is so hard to find in most fantasy novels. I’m such a slut for a good creation myth and this book gave me everything I could think to want from a fantasy novel and more. DUAL MOONS Y’ALL!!!! Chant is an asshole grandpa and I immediately liked him because he reminded me of my own family, who’ve never let the truth get in the way of a good story. (Ylfing has done nothing wrong in his life ever, and I want that known.) ETA: I realized that this book does the same thing in my brain for fantasy that The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet did for sci fi. Alex made the genre beautiful and casually inclusive, so that I felt hopeful and refreshed and welcomed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Chant (a title, not a name, he is quick to tell us) is not having a good day when we meet him at the outset of A Conspiracy of Truths, by Alexandra Rowland. He’s hungry. He’s in a foreign country. His apprentice is missing. Worst of all, he’s on trial for being a blackwitch and the court is a Kafkaeque nightmare (or it would be if Kafka existed in this fantasy world). Just as he completes his apology for committing brazen impertinence in front of the court, Chant suddenly finds himself on trial Chant (a title, not a name, he is quick to tell us) is not having a good day when we meet him at the outset of A Conspiracy of Truths, by Alexandra Rowland. He’s hungry. He’s in a foreign country. His apprentice is missing. Worst of all, he’s on trial for being a blackwitch and the court is a Kafkaeque nightmare (or it would be if Kafka existed in this fantasy world). Just as he completes his apology for committing brazen impertinence in front of the court, Chant suddenly finds himself on trial for being a blackwitch and a spy. With a death sentence hanging over his head, how on earth is a humble storyteller to get out of this one? He does it by telling stories. It’s what a Chant does, after all... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss, for review consideration.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rekka

    I. ADORE. THIS. BOOK. The characters are so well described and realized that I can't hate the villains. I can't even be sure who the villains are. Rowland crafts an incredible vast world filled with colliding cultures and ideologies, most of which the main character only recounts or experiences from one confined location after another. It's jaw-dropping how this book pulls me along without effort despite a POV character that is confined for so much of the book. Sometimes Chant feels like a sage, o I. ADORE. THIS. BOOK. The characters are so well described and realized that I can't hate the villains. I can't even be sure who the villains are. Rowland crafts an incredible vast world filled with colliding cultures and ideologies, most of which the main character only recounts or experiences from one confined location after another. It's jaw-dropping how this book pulls me along without effort despite a POV character that is confined for so much of the book. Sometimes Chant feels like a sage, other times he squeaks by as a barely competent manipulator. The fun of this book is where and when he makes an impact, and how that changes the world around him. It's the perfect low key heist of opinions and beliefs, and a delicious, cynical balm on my dumpster fire-jangled nerves. CANNOT WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK. **PTERODACTYL SCREECHING.** Flail Awards given for: - monk's-puffs, coffee, and maps - intrigue and political scheming from a total stranger to a culture - MAPS and MAP SHENANIGANS - Commentary during story-telling - AMAZING DUST JACKET OH MY GOD BUY THE HARDCOVER IT MUST BE FELT TO BE BELIEVED.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    Hello! Do you like second world fantasy that's heavy on the interrelations between story-telling, politics, and myth-making? Do you like snarky narrators who spend a solid 20% of their story complaining about how incompetent everyone is, including, sometimes, themselves? Do you like having not one, not two, but instead easily 5 or 6 complex, imperfect women in positions of power in your narrative? Do you like cinnamon roll apprentices whose hearts are as big as the whole world? If you answered y Hello! Do you like second world fantasy that's heavy on the interrelations between story-telling, politics, and myth-making? Do you like snarky narrators who spend a solid 20% of their story complaining about how incompetent everyone is, including, sometimes, themselves? Do you like having not one, not two, but instead easily 5 or 6 complex, imperfect women in positions of power in your narrative? Do you like cinnamon roll apprentices whose hearts are as big as the whole world? If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, you will love this book at least as much as I did. Four stars because I read/listened to the bulk of this book while off my face on cold medicine, and I can't tell if the parts I was confused during are the book, or just me. But I'm looking forward to the reread it will take to find out.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Seraphical

    This book is an absolute masterpiece. I have never read anything quite like it before, and it satisfied desires that I did not know I HAD, as a reader. Would you like a protagonist who is a rude person not for shock value or for "I had to give my character a flaw so I tacked one on late in the game", but because he's kind of a crotchety person in general and also he is EXTREMELY Tired of politics, political games, and being in prison? Would you like to see him influence and get caught up in all This book is an absolute masterpiece. I have never read anything quite like it before, and it satisfied desires that I did not know I HAD, as a reader. Would you like a protagonist who is a rude person not for shock value or for "I had to give my character a flaw so I tacked one on late in the game", but because he's kind of a crotchety person in general and also he is EXTREMELY Tired of politics, political games, and being in prison? Would you like to see him influence and get caught up in all kinds of chaos, again, WHILE IN PRISON? Would you like to see a story that deals with both the entire fantasy world, one country in particular, and a very small group of people with exactly the right levels of detail and makes you feel like the author has really truly thought things through and also that you will throw so much money at them to write more? Yes you do. Read this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tony Shimkets

    Unbelievably Powerful I just finished this book five minutes ago. This is a story that goes beyond. It's got that genius quintessence, that capital-m Magic that bridges the gap between 'almost' and 'perfect.' It's the type of tale that makes you cry tears of searing contentment, that imbues your spine with atavistic shivers and the skin of your shoulders with goosebumps; that made me, out of nowhere, grin, then laugh, then dance for joy at its mere thought. I need to think on it some more, and sle Unbelievably Powerful I just finished this book five minutes ago. This is a story that goes beyond. It's got that genius quintessence, that capital-m Magic that bridges the gap between 'almost' and 'perfect.' It's the type of tale that makes you cry tears of searing contentment, that imbues your spine with atavistic shivers and the skin of your shoulders with goosebumps; that made me, out of nowhere, grin, then laugh, then dance for joy at its mere thought. I need to think on it some more, and sleep besides. I'll flesh out this review then. Alexandra Rowland, you've won yourself a convert. I'll be on the lookout from now on for anything you make.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    I’m really having trouble reviewing this book to be honest. Did I love it? Yes. Did I enjoy the characters? Yes, Chant felt especially alive to me. Did I love the worldbuilding? Yes, yes, strong sense of place and what not. Do I have much more to say about this book? Well... no. I don’t want to spoil anything, see, and it is very hard to talk about what I liked in this book without spoiling it. So I will only say this: this book was very different from anything I’ve read this year. Its structure I’m really having trouble reviewing this book to be honest. Did I love it? Yes. Did I enjoy the characters? Yes, Chant felt especially alive to me. Did I love the worldbuilding? Yes, yes, strong sense of place and what not. Do I have much more to say about this book? Well... no. I don’t want to spoil anything, see, and it is very hard to talk about what I liked in this book without spoiling it. So I will only say this: this book was very different from anything I’ve read this year. Its structure is different. Its pace is different. I think the way it works is different too. I think this book is more about the journey, and less about the destination...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I loved this book - It's incredibly sarcastic, hilarious, clever, and quite brilliantly done. We learn the ins and outs of an entire country from the inside of a jail cell while our hero - Chant, a travelling storyteller- scams and plots to save his skin. Backed by an assigned advocate who'd rather being doing anything else, and the most innocent and sweetest apprentice possible, our storyteller uses his wits and cunning, telling stories of the past to political representatives to pin them again I loved this book - It's incredibly sarcastic, hilarious, clever, and quite brilliantly done. We learn the ins and outs of an entire country from the inside of a jail cell while our hero - Chant, a travelling storyteller- scams and plots to save his skin. Backed by an assigned advocate who'd rather being doing anything else, and the most innocent and sweetest apprentice possible, our storyteller uses his wits and cunning, telling stories of the past to political representatives to pin them against each other and squirm his way out of trumped up charges of Espionage and Witchcraft.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    An incredibly fun story unlike any you’ve ever heard before. You will come out changed. You will have been given a glimpse of the map that all storytellers hold and the magic that they weave will be all the more wondrous for the secrets that you will have learned. AKA grumpy grandpa storytellers + political intrigue + shenanigans + angry, flawed, powerful women + doe-eyed youth + LGBTQ+ relationships + magic + economics

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elias Eells

    A Conspiracy of Truths is truly a wonderful book. If you care about stories, the ways they're told, and the reasons why, you must read this book. The inset stories put this book in a tradition as old as storytelling and set it apart from whatever else is on the shelf. I will be buying copies to give as gifts both this holiday season and later on!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    A. J.

    The voice in this book was such a delight. I usually don’t say this but it is such a WRITERLY book. If you love biased or unreliable narrators, definitely read this book. I usually prefer a little more direct action in my plots but the voice sold the storyteller aspect beautifully.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aiyesha

    How To Limbo Your Way Out Of A Witchcraft Accusation In Twelve Easy Steps* *Social Revolution And Total Governmental Upheaval Optional, But Highly Recommended

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elzebrook

    This book is great!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gary Tyson

    Fun and creative! This book was a fun adventure, and I lived all the little stories within stories. A perfect read as the weather starrs to get cold.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Seamus Quigley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  30. 5 out of 5

    Helena

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.