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The Keeper of Lost Things

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A charming, clever, and quietly moving debut novel of of endless possibilities and joyful discoveries that explores the promises we make and break, losing and finding ourselves, the objects that hold magic and meaning for our lives, and the surprising connections that bind us. Lime green plastic flower-shaped hair bobbles—Found, on the playing field, Derrywood Park, 2nd Sep A charming, clever, and quietly moving debut novel of of endless possibilities and joyful discoveries that explores the promises we make and break, losing and finding ourselves, the objects that hold magic and meaning for our lives, and the surprising connections that bind us. Lime green plastic flower-shaped hair bobbles—Found, on the playing field, Derrywood Park, 2nd September. Bone china cup and saucer— Found, on a bench in Riveria Public Gardens, 31st October.Anthony Peardew is the keeper of lost things. Forty years ago, he carelessly lost a keepsake from his beloved fiancée, Therese. That very same day, she died unexpectedly. Brokenhearted, Anthony sought consolation in rescuing lost objects—the things others have dropped, misplaced, or accidently left behind—and writing stories about them. Now, in the twilight of his life, Anthony worries that he has not fully discharged his duty to reconcile all the lost things with their owners. As the end nears, he bequeaths his secret life’s mission to his unsuspecting assistant, Laura, leaving her his house and and all its lost treasures, including an irritable ghost. Recovering from a bad divorce, Laura, in some ways, is one of Anthony’s lost things. But when the lonely woman moves into his mansion, her life begins to change. She finds a new friend in the neighbor’s quirky daughter, Sunshine, and a welcome distraction in Freddy, the rugged gardener. As the dark cloud engulfing her lifts, Laura, accompanied by her new companions, sets out to realize Anthony’s last wish: reuniting his cherished lost objects with their owners. Long ago, Eunice found a trinket on the London pavement and kept it through the years. Now, with her own end drawing near, she has lost something precious—a tragic twist of fate that forces her to break a promise she once made. As the Keeper of Lost Objects, Laura holds the key to Anthony and Eunice’s redemption. But can she unlock the past and make the connections that will lay their spirits to rest? Full of character, wit, and wisdom, The Keeper of Lost Things is heartwarming tale that will enchant fans of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, Garden Spells, Mrs Queen Takes the Train, and The Silver Linings Playbook.


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A charming, clever, and quietly moving debut novel of of endless possibilities and joyful discoveries that explores the promises we make and break, losing and finding ourselves, the objects that hold magic and meaning for our lives, and the surprising connections that bind us. Lime green plastic flower-shaped hair bobbles—Found, on the playing field, Derrywood Park, 2nd Sep A charming, clever, and quietly moving debut novel of of endless possibilities and joyful discoveries that explores the promises we make and break, losing and finding ourselves, the objects that hold magic and meaning for our lives, and the surprising connections that bind us. Lime green plastic flower-shaped hair bobbles—Found, on the playing field, Derrywood Park, 2nd September. Bone china cup and saucer— Found, on a bench in Riveria Public Gardens, 31st October.Anthony Peardew is the keeper of lost things. Forty years ago, he carelessly lost a keepsake from his beloved fiancée, Therese. That very same day, she died unexpectedly. Brokenhearted, Anthony sought consolation in rescuing lost objects—the things others have dropped, misplaced, or accidently left behind—and writing stories about them. Now, in the twilight of his life, Anthony worries that he has not fully discharged his duty to reconcile all the lost things with their owners. As the end nears, he bequeaths his secret life’s mission to his unsuspecting assistant, Laura, leaving her his house and and all its lost treasures, including an irritable ghost. Recovering from a bad divorce, Laura, in some ways, is one of Anthony’s lost things. But when the lonely woman moves into his mansion, her life begins to change. She finds a new friend in the neighbor’s quirky daughter, Sunshine, and a welcome distraction in Freddy, the rugged gardener. As the dark cloud engulfing her lifts, Laura, accompanied by her new companions, sets out to realize Anthony’s last wish: reuniting his cherished lost objects with their owners. Long ago, Eunice found a trinket on the London pavement and kept it through the years. Now, with her own end drawing near, she has lost something precious—a tragic twist of fate that forces her to break a promise she once made. As the Keeper of Lost Objects, Laura holds the key to Anthony and Eunice’s redemption. But can she unlock the past and make the connections that will lay their spirits to rest? Full of character, wit, and wisdom, The Keeper of Lost Things is heartwarming tale that will enchant fans of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, Garden Spells, Mrs Queen Takes the Train, and The Silver Linings Playbook.

30 review for The Keeper of Lost Things

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paromjit

    This is a delightful, charming, and comic read set in London and Brighton which I adored. Laura is a divorced and broken woman for whom intimacy has proved to be a disappointment. She finds employment as housekeeper and assistant to writer Anthony Peardew, who experienced heartbreak with the loss of his beloved Therese on his wedding day. That event has coloured and haunted his entire life, with guilt over a broken promise, a lost communion medal, and led to the enormous collection of lost items This is a delightful, charming, and comic read set in London and Brighton which I adored. Laura is a divorced and broken woman for whom intimacy has proved to be a disappointment. She finds employment as housekeeper and assistant to writer Anthony Peardew, who experienced heartbreak with the loss of his beloved Therese on his wedding day. That event has coloured and haunted his entire life, with guilt over a broken promise, a lost communion medal, and led to the enormous collection of lost items which he has found with the hope of reuniting them with their owners. He dies, leaving his home, Padua, to Laura for whom it is a sanctuary, with a condition that she makes efforts to restore the lost items to their true owners. Whilst owning Padua brings security and delight to Laura, the real prize turns out to be the task Anthony sets for it offers Laura a path toward resurrecting her life again, tenuously learning to trust people and connect with the world again. With faltering steps, Laura befriends the extraordinary girl that is Sunshine, a downs syndrome child who has been bullied. Sunshine is special and has the capacity to see and understand things that elude Laura, particularly when it comes to a irascible and troubled ghost and the lost items. Laura, Freddy, the gardener, Sunshine, and Carrot, a rescued dog, begin to connect as a unit slowly developing the strength to overcome obstacles such as the ugly local rumours concerning Laura. There is a parallel story about Eunice and Bomber, and the tragedies and triumphs that litter their lives through time. The storylines do eventually connect. Interspersed throughout we have entrancing and shocking tales of some of the lost items, and the various situations that the owners found themselves in. Laura, with the help of Freddy and Sunshine, sets up a website documenting the lost collection only to find it becomes so much more than she envisaged. Ruth Hogan has weaved an intelligent, magical and fantastical tale of loss, love, heartbreak, redemption and hope. It is infused with whimsy and laugh out loud humour. It is beautifully written, and wonderfully descriptive. The wide ranging characters are what really makes the book, including the minor ones like the monstrous Portia and her ghastly novels. I cannot recommend this book enough, it is an enchanting contemporary fairytale and a great read. Many thanks to John Murray Press for an ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Library ebook Once in-awhile a book comes along that feels a little lacy, dressy, decorous, cultivated, rosy, sweet, courteous, cordial, romantic, a little mysterious, quirky, touching, sad, humorous, warm, cozy, and loving. AND YOU’RE UP FOR THE TASK! This novel was very unexpected- I not only mean the novel itself— but my enjoyment of absolutely EVERYTHING ABOUT IT. I consider myself to be a modern woman —- I rarely tap into an appreciation for people’s sentimental tchotchkes. I ‘did’ ......tap Library ebook Once in-awhile a book comes along that feels a little lacy, dressy, decorous, cultivated, rosy, sweet, courteous, cordial, romantic, a little mysterious, quirky, touching, sad, humorous, warm, cozy, and loving. AND YOU’RE UP FOR THE TASK! This novel was very unexpected- I not only mean the novel itself— but my enjoyment of absolutely EVERYTHING ABOUT IT. I consider myself to be a modern woman —- I rarely tap into an appreciation for people’s sentimental tchotchkes. I ‘did’ ......tap into my appreciation for the smallest ‘lost things’. Silly me! Darn....where is that hair clip I lost- which I use to love? Would one of you please return it to Westgate Ave. in San Jose? Thank you, kindly! There are two plot-timelines. Both were engaging—-but there was also a ‘third’ treat: stories within the storytelling. They were good! Afterall the Gentleman- Anthony Peardew, “Keeper of Lost Things”, was a writer! When housekeeper Laura inherits the job as “Keeper of Lost Things”....and tries to reunite them to their owner, she gets inventive, and gains new friends. The quiet calm tea drinking novel takes off - things get a little wacky - fun. Great characters —from gentle tranquil comforting ones to a downright wicked woman. Oh my gosh..... please enjoy your favorite drink tea ‘ properly ‘ when you read this novel .....Ha.... Here is an excerpt that might warm some readers hearts ( if you’re in the mood as I was).... or perhaps you’d like to skip that page.....but I cherished it! A little context first: Laura was interviewing for the job as housekeeper/personal assistant. She fell in love with the house right away- the Padua. Anthony would later hire her. He became her employer and close friend for 40 years. The day of the interview: “ Anthony had made her tea at the interview. He had brought it into the garden room; teapot with cozy, milk jug, sugar bowl and tongs, cups and saucers, silver teaspoons, tea strainer and stand. All set out on a tray with a tray cloth. Pure white, lace –edged linen. The tray cloth was definitive. Padua was clearly a house where all these things, including the tray cloth, were part of every day life”. Ha.... and that’s the way I prepare tea in my house every day, several times a day. Why don’t you believe me? Old-Fashion values - decorum- manners - I found it to be enchanting! Lovely book ....read it when you’re in that special mood!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristin (KC) - Traveling Sister

    *3 Stars for originality!* There is an undeniable sense of mystery and intrigue in something “lost”, and if considered enough, a single misplaced object can raise a multitude of questions: Who was the previous owner? What did this item mean to them? How did they come to misplace it? Who are they now without it? Each of these “things” tell their own story, and will speak to you if you're willing to listen… Anthony Peardew is THE KEEPER OF LOST THINGS. Having never located something he once held dea *3 Stars for originality!* There is an undeniable sense of mystery and intrigue in something “lost”, and if considered enough, a single misplaced object can raise a multitude of questions: Who was the previous owner? What did this item mean to them? How did they come to misplace it? Who are they now without it? Each of these “things” tell their own story, and will speak to you if you're willing to listen… Anthony Peardew is THE KEEPER OF LOST THINGS. Having never located something he once held dear, he knows all too well the pain of loss. In fact, his experience with loss in general runs deep. So he collects random objects—meaningless to others—and imagines what they once meant to their owners. He gives these *things* a home, and respects their history. He catalogues the exact place and moment he found them in hopes to one day reunite even one of them with their rightful owner. But, like objects, people do not stay around forever, and Anthony eventually leaves this ongoing quest in the capable hands of his caretaker, Laura, who appears equally as “lost” as his beloved objects. I loved the symbolic representation of these lost items, and how they resemble each character’s journey to finding their own way; their own home. The theme of being “lost and found” is constant and the very heart and soul of this plot. There is a compelling, magical appeal to this story, not in the literal sense, but it added a pleasant ambiance of imaginative goodness. I should have been glued to these pages with all these lovely elements at play—I wanted to be. But unfortunately that wasn't the case. This story moved slowly, maybe too slow, and while the writing was charming and exuded an air of sophistication, in this case the execution fell off for me. I found myself growing bored, waiting for a captivating moment that never came. The delicate romance was sweet and kept me hopeful, but nothing seemed to deliver on what felt promised. That said, many of my book friends loved this one, and I can see why. I’d still recommend giving this a shot when you’re in the mood for a gentler read, if only to witness its generous amounts of creativity. Hope you enjoy! Traveling Sisters read ❤️

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    Witty, Quirky, and Charming! The Keeper of Lost Things is an enchanting story about love, loss, friendship, and healing. A wonderful cast of endearing, quirky characters made this book a pleasure to read! Writer Anthony Peardew collects lost objects. He’s spent years and years collecting, hoping that one day these items will be returned to their rightful owner. Anthony’s mission stems from his own loss. When Anthony dies, he leaves his collection of lost objects to Laura, his caretaker. Laura i Witty, Quirky, and Charming! The Keeper of Lost Things is an enchanting story about love, loss, friendship, and healing. A wonderful cast of endearing, quirky characters made this book a pleasure to read! Writer Anthony Peardew collects lost objects. He’s spent years and years collecting, hoping that one day these items will be returned to their rightful owner. Anthony’s mission stems from his own loss. When Anthony dies, he leaves his collection of lost objects to Laura, his caretaker. Laura is trying to put her life back together after a messy divorce. She must fulfill Anthony’s mission and try to reunite the lost objects with their rightful owners. Laura befriends Anthony’s gardener, Freddy, and a 19-year-old neighbor, Sunshine, who has Down's syndrome. Eventually Laura, Freddy, and Sunshine find a way to reunite the objects with their owners, and once they do so, the healing process can begin. The narrative of Eunice and Bomber is woven between Laura and Anthony’s story. These two characters have a deep connection to the lost objects. The reader also gets to experience the stories behind the lost objects. While there are several pov’s, all are intertwined and have a unique connection to the lost objects. I found The Keeper of Lost Things to be a refreshing, feel-good read! I adored the unconventional characters, especially Sunshine and her lovely cup of tea. Douglas and Baby Jane also made me smile. Hogan's writing is strong; she seamlessly incorporates elements of wit and whimsy. This is a quick, light-hearted, intelligent read that I found to be the perfect summer escape!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amalia Gavea

    ‘’Found, sixth carriage from the front, 14:42 train from London Bridge to Brighton. Deceased unknown. God bless and rest in peace.’’ My relationship with this book has been a bit weird from the start. For almost a year, its beautiful cover with the peaceful cobalt blue background and the quiet pink beauty of its flowers has been calling my name from the shelf of my favourite bookshop. And every time, I would take it in my hands, read the blurb, scam and skim through a few paragraphs and return ‘’Found, sixth carriage from the front, 14:42 train from London Bridge to Brighton. Deceased unknown. God bless and rest in peace.’’ My relationship with this book has been a bit weird from the start. For almost a year, its beautiful cover with the peaceful cobalt blue background and the quiet pink beauty of its flowers has been calling my name from the shelf of my favourite bookshop. And every time, I would take it in my hands, read the blurb, scam and skim through a few paragraphs and return it to its place. When the wonderful Traveling Sisters group decided to have it as our nest read, I thought the time had finally come. The story is quite interesting and humane. Anthony, an elderly writer who has experienced a serious loss, has a strange habit. He finds lost items, discarded in the streets, in trains, in parks. He collects them, meticulously describes the time and place of discovery and then imagines the circumstances that surround the loss of these objects. As a result, the lost things aren’t just bracelets, hairpins, gloves...They become symbols for lives lost and gained. Anthony’s journey is shared by Laura who tries to leave a miserable life behind with the aid of Sunshine, a young woman who is special, unique and the most beautiful character of the novel. There are many things to appreciate in this story but there are also quite a lot of problems, in my opinion. I found the subplot of Eunice and Bomber interesting and although not closely related to the main story, it added a certain carefree attitude of a past era without wasting our time. The issues of diversity, acceptance and sexual identity were well-handled and approached with respect and tenderness. The stories of the objects collected by Anthony were outstanding. Some were nostalgic, melancholic. Others were sad, bitter. And then, there were stories of courage, perseverance and hope. The stories saved the book from becoming too melodramatic and void. I also appreciated the reference to ‘’Philadelphia’’, the film that gave Tom Hanks his first Academy Award. And now, the issues I had with the novel. I couldn’t stand Laura’s endless musings on love and sex. I wasn’t a fan of the romantic relationship and thankfully, it wasn’t a main feature in the story. I was much more interested in Anthony and Theresa and I was disappointed with the treatment of their relationship. I didn’t like the magical realism element, the subplot concerning Theresa. I thought it was a gimmick, it dragged, it seemed out of place and made Laura appear even more idiotic than before. I felt it was included just for the sake of it and was done in a sloppy, almost naive way. The dialogue could use some improvement as well. Especially Laura’s line came off as hysteric, copied from a bad movie. They did no favour to her already mediocre, passable character. Furthermore, the comments on a character’s wife were unnecessarily cruel, offending and condescending. They were racist, plain and simple. And just how many times can I read about ‘’the lovely cup of tea’’ and remain sane? The characters of Anthony, Sunshine, Eunice and Bomber were very interesting. Anthony and Sunshine provided an aura of mystery, melancholy and quirkiness in the story. Laura did very little to make me appreciate her. Yes, she had the courage to walk away from a cruel life but again, she wanted a man to define herself. Her self-pity and romantic troubles with the entirely indifferent, average Freddy made me cringe. Portia ended up being a caricature. You can't have clown characters if you want your book to be taken seriously, I’m sorry to say. So, in my opinion, this is a novel where the driving force is the story and the characters are given a supporting role. In this sense, one may consider it successful. It won’t find a place among my memorable reads but it retained a fairly nice balance between being light-hearted and quirky and meaningful. I know it would have been much better if it had been graced with a well-written main character. *This was a Traveling Sister read and my first review as a member of this amazing fellowship of magnificent ladies with a deep love for books. Discussing the novel with them was pure joy.* My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    1.5/5 stars. Okay, this was really bad! Maybe my expectations for this book were a bit too high since I picked it up because it was nominated for Goodreads’ Best Fiction 2017, but I can’t say I understand why it’s on this list. “The Keeper of Lost Things” is, in my opinion, a mediocre and sentimental love story that operates with superficial characters and unbelievable scenes. For instance, The Keeper of Lost Things turns out to be an old man who collects lost things he finds and then writes dow 1.5/5 stars. Okay, this was really bad! Maybe my expectations for this book were a bit too high since I picked it up because it was nominated for Goodreads’ Best Fiction 2017, but I can’t say I understand why it’s on this list. “The Keeper of Lost Things” is, in my opinion, a mediocre and sentimental love story that operates with superficial characters and unbelievable scenes. For instance, The Keeper of Lost Things turns out to be an old man who collects lost things he finds and then writes down where and when he found them. One thing I did like about this part, though, was that he’s a writer who writes cute and imaginative stories to go along with these lost things. Then, he decides to pass his huge collection on to his house assistant and asks her to make sure everything finds its home, and this is when the story began unravelling to me, because she accepts this challenge as a way to make up for her being a huge disappointment to her parents? I found a lot of the story to be superficial and too convenient. For instance, there is a scene in which two men meet for the first time. One man asks the other man whether he likes being a taxi driver, and the other man says yes but then elaborates with an incident in his early career in which he ran down a man? “But don’t tell my daughter”, he adds. Who in their right mind would share such an incident within the first sentences of a conversation? The beginning of this novel was kind of enchanting, but as my reading progressed my interest took a turn, and by the end I read with a constant cringing of my toes. How did this story end up on a list of “Best Fiction of the Year”?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Esil

    Charming, light and whimsical are the words I would use to describe The Keeper of Lost Things. Set in England, the story features two parallel stories that ultimately come together quite nicely. One story features middle aged Laura who inherits a house full of lost objects which she is tasked with reuniting with their owners. The other story features the lengthy unlikely friendship between Eunice and Bomber. What makes this one good are the details such as stories about the lost objects and Laur Charming, light and whimsical are the words I would use to describe The Keeper of Lost Things. Set in England, the story features two parallel stories that ultimately come together quite nicely. One story features middle aged Laura who inherits a house full of lost objects which she is tasked with reuniting with their owners. The other story features the lengthy unlikely friendship between Eunice and Bomber. What makes this one good are the details such as stories about the lost objects and Laura's friendship with a neighbourhood girl. The writing is fluid and enjoyable. I gather this is Ruth Hogan's debut, and I hope she writes more books because she is a lovely storyteller. Had I known that a slight tolerance for ghosts, magic and over the top coincidences are required to enjoy The Keeper of Lost Things, I may have been hesitant to give it a try. But none of this ended up interfering with my appreciation of this one. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    PorshaJo

    What a cute, quirky, charming book that gives you the 'feels-goods' all over. Sometimes you have to believe, that things happen for a reason. And this book, certainly points that out. Anthony Peardew is the keeper of lost things. His wife died many years ago. On the day she died, on the way to meet her, Anthony lost some precious item that she gave to him and made him promise to always keep with him. Anthony was distraught at loosing his wife and also the one item that would keep his promise and What a cute, quirky, charming book that gives you the 'feels-goods' all over. Sometimes you have to believe, that things happen for a reason. And this book, certainly points that out. Anthony Peardew is the keeper of lost things. His wife died many years ago. On the day she died, on the way to meet her, Anthony lost some precious item that she gave to him and made him promise to always keep with him. Anthony was distraught at loosing his wife and also the one item that would keep his promise and keep him close to her. So, in turn, he began to collect things that others had lost, hoping to return those items to them. He meticulously documented the items he found, eventually writing stories about them. Laura, who is completely lost, after marrying a dolt of a husband she probably never loved, comes to be Anthony's housekeeper at a wonderful home. When Anthony passes, he leaves the house to her and a condition, that she begins to return the lost things to their rightful owners. And so begins this wonderful tale. Throw in a small little love story, a wonderful neighbor Sunshine, a girl with disabilities, and you have such a heartwarming story. But there is also another interweaving story line - Eunice, who has lost something and lost the love of her life (literally). But Eunice has also found something and these two stories come together. OK, so in the end it was a bit predictable. There was a bit much going on too. At times, you also heard the stories that Anthony wrote about the lost items, then you throw a ghost into the mix. Wait...what? Honestly, I would have preferred to focus on Laura's story. But I didn't care. Such a wonderful thing, to return items to people who have lost them, often times, it was more the memory of the item that made them happy, rather than the item itself. But for me, the standout was the lovely character of Sunshine. I love her. I listened to this one via audio and enjoyed it tremendously. However, sometimes I got lost a bit in the switching of stories back and forth and wish I had the print. Overall, a read I would suggest to anyone who wants a quick, quirky read that will lift their spirits.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This book was a real pleasure to read. It had a bit of everything, romance, ghostly presences, magic, mystery and clever literary references being just some. I enjoyed all of the characters especially Sunshine with her quirky speech and odd ways. Two main stories alternate and meander gently through the book, interspersed with lovely anecdotes about the lost things. Some of these are quite sharp and counteract the general sweetness of the book. Mind you this is a book which starts and ends with This book was a real pleasure to read. It had a bit of everything, romance, ghostly presences, magic, mystery and clever literary references being just some. I enjoyed all of the characters especially Sunshine with her quirky speech and odd ways. Two main stories alternate and meander gently through the book, interspersed with lovely anecdotes about the lost things. Some of these are quite sharp and counteract the general sweetness of the book. Mind you this is a book which starts and ends with a biscuit tin full of someone's earthly remains so it is not all sweetness and light! At the end I discover that this is a debut novel (impressive), the author comes from Bedford in the U.K (so do I) and that she wrote much of the book while she was being treated for cancer. Congratulations Ms Hogan on such a good first book and may you write many more!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    After listening to too many mysteries, I needed a change of pace. This was it. The plot has been described by other reviewers. Suffice it to say, the book was refreshing in a quirky sort of way. At first, it was somewhat confusing to listen to, as the POVs and storylines change with each chapter. But once I got the hang of it, especially the back stories on some of the lost items, it clipped along at a nice pace. Lovely, sweet, humorous, sad. It encompasses all the emotions. If I had been reading After listening to too many mysteries, I needed a change of pace. This was it. The plot has been described by other reviewers. Suffice it to say, the book was refreshing in a quirky sort of way. At first, it was somewhat confusing to listen to, as the POVs and storylines change with each chapter. But once I got the hang of it, especially the back stories on some of the lost items, it clipped along at a nice pace. Lovely, sweet, humorous, sad. It encompasses all the emotions. If I had been reading instead of listening, I would have been highlighting like mad. The writing is divine, especially Sunshine’s way of speaking. Like Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, A Man Called Ove or Goodbye,Paris, it shows that family is what you make it and not necessarily blood. In fact, I doubt anyone would want to claim Portia, the one actual sibling of a main character, as family. And for those who have problems with all the modern day attempts to rewrite the classics, you will get a special chuckle from Portia’s attempts at writing. Normally, anything to do with ghosts sends me skittering away. But here, the “deceased diva” just adds a bit of humor and poignancy to the equation. The ending is especially perfect. It brings lots of tears, laughs and smiles, which probably made lots of folks on the trail I walk wonder what was going on with me. The audiobook has several narrators, each of whom does a solid job. Adding this to my favorites of 2018. Highly recommend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patti

    If I had a dollar for every time the author wrote,"a lovely cup of tea", I could buy another book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    *TANYA*

    Enchanting!!! A fairytale type of story and I loved it!! Funny, witty, sad and very endearing!! The characters and all the side stories were very engaging. (I’m off to make a lovely cup of tea!)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alena

    I was so drawn to the premise of this book -- a man mourning the loss of the love of his life collects lost objects, hoping to reunite them with their owners, meanwhile writing short stories about each object. So much potential there. It started off with charm but quickly fell apart into disjointed parallel storylines, with so many plot contrivances I was groaning. Add the ancillary characters who were only there to move the plot and by the time the ghost (yes, ghost) came in I was pretty much do I was so drawn to the premise of this book -- a man mourning the loss of the love of his life collects lost objects, hoping to reunite them with their owners, meanwhile writing short stories about each object. So much potential there. It started off with charm but quickly fell apart into disjointed parallel storylines, with so many plot contrivances I was groaning. Add the ancillary characters who were only there to move the plot and by the time the ghost (yes, ghost) came in I was pretty much done.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margitte

    This was a super entertaining, fun, mysterious, and charming read. Love in different forms, from different angles, and stories in the little things lost. And then there is the Keeper of Lost Things, who knew how to connect the dots for those who needed to find ending in the clues. A dollop of magic realism strewn around London and Brighton. Mmmm .... spooky, sad, and funny. The blurb is longgggg....and explains the book. I'm just adding the first introductory paragraph here: A charming, clever, a This was a super entertaining, fun, mysterious, and charming read. Love in different forms, from different angles, and stories in the little things lost. And then there is the Keeper of Lost Things, who knew how to connect the dots for those who needed to find ending in the clues. A dollop of magic realism strewn around London and Brighton. Mmmm .... spooky, sad, and funny. The blurb is longgggg....and explains the book. I'm just adding the first introductory paragraph here: A charming, clever, and quietly moving debut novel of of endless possibilities and joyful discoveries that explores the promises we make and break, losing and finding ourselves, the objects that hold magic and meaning for our lives, and the surprising connections that bind us. A perfect description for a perfect read. If you need a chicken-soup-for-the-soul read, this is the one for you. I loved everything about it. Hope you do too ;-)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    "It had been in his pocket as he stood waiting for Therese on the corner of Great Russell Street. But she never came, and by the time he got home that day, he had lost them both. He went back to look for the medallion. He searched the streets and gutters, but he had known that it was a hopeless task. It was as though he had lost her twice. It was the invisible thread that would have connected him to her even after she was gone, but now it was broken along with his promise to her. And so it was t "It had been in his pocket as he stood waiting for Therese on the corner of Great Russell Street. But she never came, and by the time he got home that day, he had lost them both. He went back to look for the medallion. He searched the streets and gutters, but he had known that it was a hopeless task. It was as though he had lost her twice. It was the invisible thread that would have connected him to her even after she was gone, but now it was broken along with his promise to her. And so it was that he began to gather other people's lost things; gather them in and keep them safe, just in case one day, one of them could mend a broken heart, and thus redeem a broken man." The Keeper of Lost Things is a delightful debut by British novelist Ruth Hogan. The story centers around two different sets of characters. The primary storyline is modern day and revolves around Laura, an assistant to aging author Anthony Peardew. Laura has suffered some major setback in her life but finds refuge at Padua, Peardew's estate. After her employer dies, Laura is left with the task of finding the owners of all of the lost items that he had collected over the years. The second point of view is told from the perspective of Eunice and centers around her life-long relationship with publisher/employer/ best friend Bomber. The story is beautifully written, humorous, and includes many colorful and charming characters, human and canine, along with a few odious ones. The story really begins to flow after the first forty pages and the pieces of the stories begin to connect. I would describe the novel as a modern day fairy tale in which fantastical events intertwine all of the characters and their fates. It examines love in its many forms and includes literal and figurative ghosts. I highly recommend this novel for anyone looking for a charming, feel-good read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart. Marcus Aurelius An uplifting, enchanting and marvelously crafted escapist read with minimal fluff and maximum appeal. The Keeper of Lost Things is the perfect antidote for what ails us. As much a tale about the loss of things as people, love and even self, the threads that connect us and the kindness of strangers. Hogan has seamlessly plotted two separate stories, e Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart. Marcus Aurelius An uplifting, enchanting and marvelously crafted escapist read with minimal fluff and maximum appeal. The Keeper of Lost Things is the perfect antidote for what ails us. As much a tale about the loss of things as people, love and even self, the threads that connect us and the kindness of strangers. Hogan has seamlessly plotted two separate stories, each just as entertaining, while weaving the imagined stories of the lost items throughout. She then added more than a few eccentrics, a feisty spirit and a sweet innocent by the name of Sunshine whom you will come to love, and gave us a story brimming with wit, wisdom and charm galore. Whether The Keeper of Lost Things is a story of happenstance, serendipity or the fickleness of fate is up to each reader to decide, but for me it was a gloriously clever and heartwarming story that belied its simple premise and gave me much to ponder. And I’ve already put her new novel, The Wisdom of Sally Red Shoes on my list for when I need a small dose of frothy, feel-good bookishness. __________ Excerpt from an interview with Ruth Hogan for those of us who like to know the inspiration for a story and just a teeny bit more: The Keeper Of Lost Things began with a single sentence that came into my head on a train journey and that sentence eventually became the first line of the novel. But it took a while for me to come up with the rest of the story. I often describe myself as a documentary junkie, and the more weird and wonderful the topic, the more it interests me. I’m forever cutting things out of magazines and newspapers, and the plot for Keeper was initially sparked by two news articles – the first about the strange things that end up in Lost Property Departments, and the second about the fate of cremation remains that are never claimed from funeral directors. My leading man, Anthony Peardew, was inspired by a former neighbour of mine who, I was told, became a reclusive hoarder after the tragic death of his fiancée. I named him Anthony and gave him a house called Padua, because Saint Anthony of Padua is the patron saint of lost things. Peardew was a little joke that I had with myself. It is pronounced in the same way as ‘perdu’ – the French word for ‘lost.’ Anthony’s fiancée, Therese, was named after Saint Therese of Lisieux, who was also known as Saint Therese of the Roses, which just happen to be my favourite flowers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Helga

    Sometimes when you are reading a book, you feel you want to join the characters, have some tea and biscuits with them, share their laughter and sorrows and cheer them in their journeys, be a part of them, be with them. And when you read the final chapter, the final sentence, and you see THE END, you feel miserable that the time has come for you to say your farewells. Well, this is one of those books. An enchanting debut novel from Ruth Hogan about love, friendship and passion, life and afterlife Sometimes when you are reading a book, you feel you want to join the characters, have some tea and biscuits with them, share their laughter and sorrows and cheer them in their journeys, be a part of them, be with them. And when you read the final chapter, the final sentence, and you see THE END, you feel miserable that the time has come for you to say your farewells. Well, this is one of those books. An enchanting debut novel from Ruth Hogan about love, friendship and passion, life and afterlife, acceptance and endurance. Absolutely loved it!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

    4.5 Stars ”I found a dream that I could speak to A dream that I can call my own I found a thrill to press my cheek to A thrill I've never known, oh yeah You smiled, you smiled oh and then the spell was cast And here we are in Heaven For you are mine at last -- At Last, Etta James, Songwriters: Harry Warren / Mack Gordon Whimsical. delightful, charming, comic, intelligent, magical, fantastical, lacy, decorous, cultivated, sweet, courteous, cordial, romantic, mysterious, quirky, touching, sad, humorous, wa 4.5 Stars ”I found a dream that I could speak to A dream that I can call my own I found a thrill to press my cheek to A thrill I've never known, oh yeah You smiled, you smiled oh and then the spell was cast And here we are in Heaven For you are mine at last -- At Last, Etta James, Songwriters: Harry Warren / Mack Gordon Whimsical. delightful, charming, comic, intelligent, magical, fantastical, lacy, decorous, cultivated, sweet, courteous, cordial, romantic, mysterious, quirky, touching, sad, humorous, warm, enchanting, lovely, cozy – these are all words that have been used to describe this story, and it is all that, and perhaps more. When I was young my parents would take us on “Sunday drives,” which frequently meant we’d end up at some previously unexplored Antique Shop in some small town that had seemingly gone undiscovered for years, if I could judge by the dust. I used to imagine stories about the previous owners (and the ones before that, and so on) of these objects that ended up in our home. Imagine these objects in their hands, their homes. How did it come to be in a shop being sold by a stranger? Anthony Peardew has learned, through experience, the pain and heartbreak that can come through loss. An object isn’t always just itself; it can be attached to someone’s memories - of a person, an event, and a time of happiness. A time of sadness, even. When he finds items left behind, lost, he brings them home in the hopes that he may reunite them with the person who is missing them. He catalogs each item, and records the place and time he found them, hoping that someday they will return to their home. Anthony Peardew is The Keeper of Lost Things. ”HUNTLEY & PALMERS BISCUIT TIN CONTAIN- ING CREMATION REMAINS? Found, sixth carriage from the front, 14:42 train from London Bridge to Brighton. Deceased unknown. God bless and rest in peace.” Laura, a young woman who is working for this Keeper of Lost Things since the day she spotted the want ad that Anthony Peardew had placed. She was once lost, herself, but Anthony helped her to reunite with her true self, and not the one others had tried to form her to be. He knows too well the pain of losing something dear, and knows the value in having something to hold onto. ”The only promise that Therese had ever asked of him, and he had failed her. And so he had started to gather the things that other people lost. It was his only chance for atonement.” I wanted to love this more than I loved it, but there is an essence that I really did love. Sometimes, I can read a book where the ending seems to just wander off into a future and it seems natural, right, but this fell just a little short for me. I loved the characters in this, even the snooty Portia, and especially Sunshine, and Anthony’s story, wonderful, but heartbreaking. I loved the stories of the lost things. I loved these perfectly imperfect character’s stories. Perhaps, when all is said and done, it is not only for the things we do well, but it is also with our imperfections for which we are loved. Many thanks to the Public Library system, and the many Librarians that manage, organize and keep it running, for the loan of this book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Smith

    Anthony Peardew collects lost items, catalogues them and stores them in his study hoping one day the thousands of objects will be reunited with their rightful owners. Knowing he is dying he bequeaths his house and all the lost treasures, to his assistant and friend Laura, the one person he knows who will carry out his wishes. However, unforeseen repercussions trigger some unanticipated series of encounters. As the threads of the story gradually pull together, questions are answered, lives are ch Anthony Peardew collects lost items, catalogues them and stores them in his study hoping one day the thousands of objects will be reunited with their rightful owners. Knowing he is dying he bequeaths his house and all the lost treasures, to his assistant and friend Laura, the one person he knows who will carry out his wishes. However, unforeseen repercussions trigger some unanticipated series of encounters. As the threads of the story gradually pull together, questions are answered, lives are changed and the lost are found. I loved the unusual and funny names the author used in her book and the individual characters are definitely unique and perfectly suited to her stories. I adored teenager 'Sunshine' who had Down Syndrome or as she calls herself a 'dancing drome', she was the star of the book for me, witty, honest without censor and with a very special gift indeed. There's a gorgeous cover to this book too which is becoming quite a trademark of this author, bright and colourful with little pictures of some of the 'lost' items dotted around the roses which they themselves are symbolic to the story. "The Keeper of Lost Things" is beautiful to read and really quite unique, I would without doubt recommend this exquisite book wholeheartedly. Everybody should read this stunning book, it truly is a real tonic to the soul, oozing warmth, its funny, compassionate, heart warming and a sheer delightful to read. Sheer brilliance!!! 5 stars

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maria Espadinha

    A Cereja que Bóia no Cocktail Chá...Fantasmas...Mistério...Magia... É neste estranho cocktail que esta história acontece! E que livro único! Daqueles em que se exclama: Oh!... Nunca li nada assim!... E é sempre tão gratificante soltar esta exclamação cada vez mais funda! Que teima por não sair! Deleitei-me a sorver este cocktail de sabores exóticos!... ;) E que capa! Objectos perdidos, disseminados sobre rosas vermelhas. Cada objecto, uma história linda e triste -- uma rosa com espinhos Episódios da vida re A Cereja que Bóia no Cocktail Chá...Fantasmas...Mistério...Magia... É neste estranho cocktail que esta história acontece! E que livro único! Daqueles em que se exclama: Oh!... Nunca li nada assim!... E é sempre tão gratificante soltar esta exclamação cada vez mais funda! Que teima por não sair! Deleitei-me a sorver este cocktail de sabores exóticos!... ;) E que capa! Objectos perdidos, disseminados sobre rosas vermelhas. Cada objecto, uma história linda e triste -- uma rosa com espinhos Episódios da vida real -- ficções que bem podiam ser verdades... E as personagens são malhas duma rede que se vai tecendo Nós que se atam nos momentos certos Para que a rede persista, não rasgue, não rompa!... Seres que se complementam e completam, mostrando que nada acontece por acaso neste todo misterioso, onde vidas pontuais coexistem e se interligam, num plano insondável, que as abarca e transcende!... Original, Estranho, Maravilhoso! E tem brinde -- o cocktail trás cereja: É um hino em prosa à amizade -- haverá melhor presente na vida?!... :) “— O que é que me chateia? —” “— Não ter um tipo bonito com um desportivo vermelho, um Filofax e um apartamento em Chelsea? Eunice deu uma dentada decidida na ponta do gressino. — Para que diabo havia de querer uma pessoa assim quando te tenho a ti e ao Douglas?” Para ler num jardim povoado por canteiros -- belos canteiros de rosas vermelhas :)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Norma * Traveling Sister

    3.5 stars rounded down! This book was such a wonderful, delightful, quiet and heartwarming tale that I wish I would have loved a little bit more. My mind wandered quite a bit while reading this one and I had a hard time staying focused on this story but, I absolutely loved the ending & the premise of this story though! This is a feel-good story with a sweet and pleasing ending that I am happy that I read though. Would recommend! I think I’m ready to read a fast-paced thriller! 😀

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walsh

    I was sent a copy of The Keeper of Lost Things by Goodreads, which means that it is a shame that I feel duty bound to put up a review of this book. I pretty much knew from paragraph one that I wasn’t going to like it. It is the worst book I have read in a long, long time, and certainly the worst book I have finished. The most complimentary word I can find to describe it is ‘cute’. Everything about it is cute, every stereotyped character is cute, every stereotyped dog is cute. It is sugar, coated I was sent a copy of The Keeper of Lost Things by Goodreads, which means that it is a shame that I feel duty bound to put up a review of this book. I pretty much knew from paragraph one that I wasn’t going to like it. It is the worst book I have read in a long, long time, and certainly the worst book I have finished. The most complimentary word I can find to describe it is ‘cute’. Everything about it is cute, every stereotyped character is cute, every stereotyped dog is cute. It is sugar, coated in sugar. If you were thinking of reading it because of the cute cover, just find another book. The one next to it has to be better than this trite drivel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Dunbar

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. AWFUL. Truly appalling. I don't even know where to start. Maybe with a single positive - the first three chapters were quite good, and it's a terrible shame that Anthony Peardew didn't stick around because things went decidedly downhill after he died. I started to really worry about the book when it became clear that there would be no shift in the narrative voice whatsoever - and what I mean by that is that, when the little 'stories behind the items' were included, they were narrated in the exac AWFUL. Truly appalling. I don't even know where to start. Maybe with a single positive - the first three chapters were quite good, and it's a terrible shame that Anthony Peardew didn't stick around because things went decidedly downhill after he died. I started to really worry about the book when it became clear that there would be no shift in the narrative voice whatsoever - and what I mean by that is that, when the little 'stories behind the items' were included, they were narrated in the exact same manner as the text that had come before it, with Laura in centre stage. Given that they were supposed to have been written by Anthony, this was a grievous mistake. Now I'm no stranger to alliteration and similes and I understand the purpose that they serve. However, Hogan took this TOO FAR. Everything was an alliteration - Poisonous Portia, Slinked seductively into the salon (everything was alliterated, all the time!) and the clichés were never-ending. The dialogue was nothing short of embarrassing, 'Liar Liar Pants on Fire!' Etc etc. I don't think anyone speaks to friends and family like that. By far the most AWFUL part of the book was Sunshine, the 'dancing drome' character with Down Syndrome. This was truly, truly appalling and really quite shameful. 'Is it time for the lovely cup of tea' will haunt me until my dying day. What a horrendous sentence to impose upon the character, whose sole purpose *seems* to have been to provide some comedy for the woeful characters that were her 'friends' - such as best friend and 'heroine' Laura who mocks her, hides from her in the larder and, at no point I would argue, is likeable in any sense. In fact, despite Anthony's belief that she is a tortured soul who loves the house as much as him ... she spent most of the last 200 pages trashing it in a rage. Added to that Sunshine's preternatural capabilities, a TERRIBLE, predictable and sickly-sweet plot, not to mention another 15,000 similes and cliches ... this was not a good read. AVOID.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bookread2day

    A ray of sunshine of a novel. Beautifully written. Every character I cared about. I highly recommend to contemporary readers as the whole story just pulls you in.

  25. 5 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    3.5★ “Uncertain how to greet a person of such standing, Sunshine bobbed a little curtsey and offered him a high five.” This story is partly old-school quaint (notes written with fountain pens) and partly up-to-the-minute modern (creating a website). We meet Anthony Peardew returning to “Padua”, his home of many years, always referred to by name, not address. He’s an elderly author, the owner of the fountain pen, whose house “was untainted by the tinnitus of technology.” I enjoyed many of Hogan’s ph 3.5★ “Uncertain how to greet a person of such standing, Sunshine bobbed a little curtsey and offered him a high five.” This story is partly old-school quaint (notes written with fountain pens) and partly up-to-the-minute modern (creating a website). We meet Anthony Peardew returning to “Padua”, his home of many years, always referred to by name, not address. He’s an elderly author, the owner of the fountain pen, whose house “was untainted by the tinnitus of technology.” I enjoyed many of Hogan’s phrases like that one, but I’d put a book back on the library shelf if I spotted this one: “[Laura] was surprised by the smile that hijacked her lips.” Please, no. But it wasn’t a library book, so I’m glad I pressed on and didn’t miss this passage. Our heroine, Laura is lunching alone in a restaurant and overhears two women with Dickens-worthy names (Marjory Wadscallop and Winnie Cripp) gossiping about why a well-known elderly author, Laura’s boss, would have a young woman living in his house. Finally, she can’t help herself. “‘Fellatio,’ she announced. ‘Every Friday.’ And without another word, she swept out. Winnie turned to Marjory with a puzzled expression. ‘What’s that when it’s at home?’ ‘Italian,’ said Marjory, dabbing at her mouth with a napkin. ‘I had it in a restaurant once.’” Love it! The real reason, of course, is explained to us early. After the love of his life died, Anthony had hired Laura to housekeep, cook, and type his stories. She has the run of the house, except for his study, and when Anthony goes into the study, we see why. He lost something precious a long time ago and began collecting and cataloguing everything he finds on his walks, thinking perhaps someone will do the same for what he lost. It’s become an overflowing museum of “stuff”. “ . . .her death had given him his purpose. It had made Anthony Peardew the Keeper of Lost Things.” He’s been a popular writer for years, but his later stories have been more serious and now he’s stopped writing and isn’t eating much. Laura is worried and despondent herself. Cue the gardener, Freddy! Attractive and friendly, but Laura tries to remain distant. (We know how long that will last, don’t we?) He’s in charge of the magnificent rose garden, a tribute to Anthony’s late love. And later, cue the girl across the street, Sunshine. She of the curtsey and the high-five I quoted earlier. I have a complaint about our introduction to Sunshine, which I’ll hide in a spoiler, not that it gives anything away about the story, but I found it odd. (view spoiler)[Sunshine has Down’s Syndrome, which has very recognisable physical characteristics, so Laura and Freddy would have known that, but we are introduced to her as just a quirky, outspoken young girl until much later. Why? She says she’s “dancer drome”. (hide spoiler)] There is a second story line beginning several decades earlier where a young woman, Eunice, is hired by a publisher, nicknamed “Bomber”. We follow their lives, and places where they may have crossed paths with Anthony in the past. it’s not an unpleasant story, but it has little or no bearing on Laura’s story, so back to that. Sunshine shows a psychic sense about the lost things, which made it easy to introduce tiny back stories for different items. While these were entertaining, they really do nothing to flesh out the characters or plot either. And oh yes, the house is haunted. Things move, doors lock, and only Sunshine seems able to explain. This is a light, cheerful book – comfort reading for many, I’m sure – with some gentle fun-poking at snobs. But the food. Always the food! Here, Laura is hoping to tempt Anthony to have a bite of lunch in his study. “The clock in the hallway struck one and Laura began gathering ingredients for lunch. She beat eggs and cheese together with fresh herbs from the garden, tipped the mixture into a hot pan on the stove and watched it froth and bubble and then settle into a fluffy, golden omelette. The tray was set with a crisp, white linen napkin, a silver knife and fork and a glass of elderflower cordial.” It’s that kind of book. Never-ending lovely cups of tea, salmon and cucumber sandwiches and lemon curd tarts. I get it. The tea is what Sunshine knows how to do. It’s homey. People breaking bread together. Caring, nurturing. Enough! In fact, too much for me. As a publisher complained of Anthony’s darker stories, which he refused to publish: “I know what normal, decent people like, and that’s good, straightforward stories with a happy ending where the baddies get their comeuppance, the guy gets the girl and the sex isn’t too outré.” If this is you, you’ll love this book and you won't be alone. And now I'm hungry and feel the need of a lovely cup of tea! : )

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pauline

    The Keeper of Lost Things was very different from the books I usually read. It had a lot of different storylines and characters. Some of the characters were very likeable and my favourite character was Sunshine. I would like to thank NetGalley and John Murray Press for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty 📚📖❤️

    A delightful feel good story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Sigh. I didn't like this book. It's one of those cute, sweet, Hallmark-movie type stories that I wish I did like, but the simpleness and sweetness and the obvious way that everything wraps up perfectly is so implausible that it made me groan in frustration. The story opens with a writer, Anthony, who enjoys collecting lost things (such as a lone puzzle piece in the street, a forgotten umbrella in the park, etc.) When Anthony dies, his assistant, Laura, is tasked with trying to return the hundreds Sigh. I didn't like this book. It's one of those cute, sweet, Hallmark-movie type stories that I wish I did like, but the simpleness and sweetness and the obvious way that everything wraps up perfectly is so implausible that it made me groan in frustration. The story opens with a writer, Anthony, who enjoys collecting lost things (such as a lone puzzle piece in the street, a forgotten umbrella in the park, etc.) When Anthony dies, his assistant, Laura, is tasked with trying to return the hundreds of lost items to their rightful owners. An impossible task, right? Completely ridiculous? Not in this novel! All Laura needs is the help from a plucky neighborhood girl and a conveniently handsome gardener and miracles can happen! Ever since I finished it, I've been puzzling over why this novel irked me so, because I do enjoy the occasional light and fluffy book. Was it the simple writing? The one-dimensional characters? The bad dialogue? The poorly constructed mystery? The too-sweet ending? I concluded that it was all of those things. A novel could survive one, maybe two of those flaws, and still be enjoyed. But the burden of so many sins weighed this down for me, and what was meant to be light ended up being a drag.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce

    If you are a lover of wonderfully told stories where people truly love one another, then this book is ever so right for you. It is told with such tenderness of a love story immersed within two love stories. It is a story of requited love and love that was felt but never could be carried through. It was a story of people, a bit broken at times, but with the strength and love we all possess and probably should show more of. This was a feel good story, one that will propel you out of the doldrums a If you are a lover of wonderfully told stories where people truly love one another, then this book is ever so right for you. It is told with such tenderness of a love story immersed within two love stories. It is a story of requited love and love that was felt but never could be carried through. It was a story of people, a bit broken at times, but with the strength and love we all possess and probably should show more of. This was a feel good story, one that will propel you out of the doldrums and make you quite glad that you got to spend some time with Anthony, Laura, Sunshine, Freddy, Eunice, and Bomber and least I forget some lovely four legged friends. Imagine finding and labeling and keeping things you have found in your lifetime. Now imagine wanting to find the people who lost those things. In that you have the premise of this book. It was endearing and brought a big smile to my face as I turned the last page and read the last word. Now out to take a look for some lost things as I would truly love to be a keeper of lost things too!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Dear Reader, This was truly one of the most beautifully written books that I've ever had the pleasure of reading. Not specifically looking for it,yesterday,in the bookstore it found me. Once I'd read the first page I knew it had found a new home. Wonderfully descriptive,this story weaves the life stories of Anthony,Therese,Laura, Freddy,Sunshine,Eunice and Bomber into a rich tapestry of daily life burnished with its myriad sorrows and joys. Peppered with emotive issues,soulful moments and delightf Dear Reader, This was truly one of the most beautifully written books that I've ever had the pleasure of reading. Not specifically looking for it,yesterday,in the bookstore it found me. Once I'd read the first page I knew it had found a new home. Wonderfully descriptive,this story weaves the life stories of Anthony,Therese,Laura, Freddy,Sunshine,Eunice and Bomber into a rich tapestry of daily life burnished with its myriad sorrows and joys. Peppered with emotive issues,soulful moments and delightful snapshots into these colourful characters,we are privy to a tale encompassing love,second chances, familial bonds and companionship. I loved this addictive,deeply compelling,'food for the soul' story. I highly recommend it to those seeking a life affirming,heartwarming tale,eloquently penned by a talented author gifted with a magical way with words.

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