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Wonder Woman: Earth One, Vol. 2

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The highly anticipated sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling original graphic novel is here in WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 2, from the acclaimed creative team of Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette! For years, Diana of Paradise Island yearned to leave the only home she knew behind for adventures that laid beyond its shores. Now, after a fateful meeting with Air Force The highly anticipated sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling original graphic novel is here in WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 2, from the acclaimed creative team of Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette! For years, Diana of Paradise Island yearned to leave the only home she knew behind for adventures that laid beyond its shores. Now, after a fateful meeting with Air Force pilot Steve Trevor, the Amazon Warrior finds herself in Man’s World. And she is ready for anything that it may throw at her. But is the world ready for Wonder Woman? An American Government, fraught with dissession and conflicts foreign to Diana, have deemed her a danger to society. How will Wonder Woman carry out her mission of peace and love in a world that can’t get out of its own way? That is, unless there are more insidious forces at play… Continuing the tradition of critically acclaimed EARTH ONE tales that challenge the status quo of the comics industry, WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 2 is Grant Morrison’s latest genre-rocking salvo. With dynamic illustrations from the divine Yanick Paquette, this original graphic novel is a classic in the making.


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The highly anticipated sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling original graphic novel is here in WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 2, from the acclaimed creative team of Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette! For years, Diana of Paradise Island yearned to leave the only home she knew behind for adventures that laid beyond its shores. Now, after a fateful meeting with Air Force The highly anticipated sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling original graphic novel is here in WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 2, from the acclaimed creative team of Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette! For years, Diana of Paradise Island yearned to leave the only home she knew behind for adventures that laid beyond its shores. Now, after a fateful meeting with Air Force pilot Steve Trevor, the Amazon Warrior finds herself in Man’s World. And she is ready for anything that it may throw at her. But is the world ready for Wonder Woman? An American Government, fraught with dissession and conflicts foreign to Diana, have deemed her a danger to society. How will Wonder Woman carry out her mission of peace and love in a world that can’t get out of its own way? That is, unless there are more insidious forces at play… Continuing the tradition of critically acclaimed EARTH ONE tales that challenge the status quo of the comics industry, WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 2 is Grant Morrison’s latest genre-rocking salvo. With dynamic illustrations from the divine Yanick Paquette, this original graphic novel is a classic in the making.

30 review for Wonder Woman: Earth One, Vol. 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Khurram

    What a disappointment. I did not like the first volume of Wonder Woman Earth One so I can't really blame anyone for me not enjoying this one. I figured it could not be as bad as the first one and in fairness it is not but it is close. The story or lack of story is boring, the whole thing is disjointed, and jumps from place to place. I actually 're-read pages not because I enjoyed them but because I did not think that I could have missed so much between pages. To be honest I really do not understa What a disappointment. I did not like the first volume of Wonder Woman Earth One so I can't really blame anyone for me not enjoying this one. I figured it could not be as bad as the first one and in fairness it is not but it is close. The story or lack of story is boring, the whole thing is disjointed, and jumps from place to place. I actually 're-read pages not because I enjoyed them but because I did not think that I could have missed so much between pages. To be honest I really do not understand what the point of this story was. I have to say it is probably the most boring Wonder Woman books I have read. The main bad guy seems to set out to prove that for all of her strength and power Wonder Woman is still "just a woman", and the worst part is he manages to break her. Then just as the story starts to show some promise it ends. I hate leaving stories unfinished but I definitely have to consider if I want send any money on the next book. In both volumes this incarnation of Wonder Woman acts mire like a free love hippy guru then a champion of justice. I definitely would not recommend this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I feel like Kevin Sorbo yelling out stage directions: DISAPPOINTED! Wonder Woman: Earth One, Volume 2 is your run-of-the-mill Wonder Woman/superhero story: a Nazi superwoman threatens Paradise Island – Diana’s mom gotta punch her; Doctor Psycho’s up to no good – Diana’s gotta punch him. Hmm… The story really is that generic and uninspired. Amid all that blandness Grant Morrison continues setting out his submitting-to-love thing that Wonder Woman’s creator was into way back in the ‘40s. Fine, but I feel like Kevin Sorbo yelling out stage directions: DISAPPOINTED! Wonder Woman: Earth One, Volume 2 is your run-of-the-mill Wonder Woman/superhero story: a Nazi superwoman threatens Paradise Island – Diana’s mom gotta punch her; Doctor Psycho’s up to no good – Diana’s gotta punch him. Hmm… The story really is that generic and uninspired. Amid all that blandness Grant Morrison continues setting out his submitting-to-love thing that Wonder Woman’s creator was into way back in the ‘40s. Fine, but we saw all that in the first book. She saves oppressed girls, shows up some men – she’s the boringly unstoppable hero. Maxwell Lord is introduced, foreshadowing the conflict for the third and final book in the trilogy, but that’s by the by. Yanick Paquette’s art continues to be glorious and he definitely draws the best representation of Doctor Psycho I’ve seen yet (not sure why he looks like Nick Cave though??). I usually enjoy Grant Morrison’s comics but he didn’t bring anything special to the table with this one. Love will save the world… uh huh… snore… Wonder Woman: Earth One, Volume 2 proves that sometimes love isn’t all you need.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Wonder Woman: Earth One is the worst comic book Grant Morrison‘s ever written, no joke — and I am a huge and hopeless fan of the guy. The first volume was awful, and the second one follows suit. This entire series comes out of Morrison’s affection for cheesy Golden Age comics coupled with an old man’s understanding of modern society and issues such as feminism and gender equality. The result is a fascinating train wreck, and it’s so clear that Morrison means well, he just doesn’t have a deep eno Wonder Woman: Earth One is the worst comic book Grant Morrison‘s ever written, no joke — and I am a huge and hopeless fan of the guy. The first volume was awful, and the second one follows suit. This entire series comes out of Morrison’s affection for cheesy Golden Age comics coupled with an old man’s understanding of modern society and issues such as feminism and gender equality. The result is a fascinating train wreck, and it’s so clear that Morrison means well, he just doesn’t have a deep enough understanding of the issues he tries to cover, and ends up writing a book that’s offensive to pretty much every party involved. And I could at least partially forgive all that if the main story was any good, but it just isn’t — some Nick Cave lookalike tries to mind-control Diana, meanwhile a chesty nazi lady is up to some chesty nazi lady shenanigans over at Themyscira. There’s zero character development here just like in volume 1, and zero tension and excitement in the story. Once again Grant Morrison proves to be entirely unable to tell an interesting Wonder Woman story, and that’s fine, considering he has such a deep understanding of pretty much every other DC character. Just let it go, Grant. Diana is just not for you. Yanick Paquette’s artwork keeps being porny as hell, and nullifies this book’s every pathetic attempt at being feminist. He never misses a chance to draw his women in lusty, suggestive poses with half-opened mouths and horny smiles, doesn’t matter if the character is playing a sport, fighting a bad guy or just walking down the street. There are several naked shots of Hippolyta taking a sexy shower, as well as numerous panels devoted entirely to Diana’s butt and breasts. Overall, the second volume of Morrison’s Wonder Woman: Earth One is just as bad as the first one. In our day and age when we have so many other great Wonder Woman stories, from thoughtful and deep Rebirth run by Greg Rucka to a daring and audacious one by Brian Azzarello to more classical and down-to-earth stories from Jill Thompson and Renae De Liz, I just don’t see the value in Morrison’s take on the character. If anything, it comes off as degrading and ill-advised. Then again, sometimes it feels like the entire Earth One line was created for the most degrading and ill-advised takes on otherwise great characters.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. After what was certainly the most disappointing story by Grant Morrison yet, we finally return to the provocative retelling of Wonder Woman’s origin story in this second volume of DC Comics’ Earth One graphic novel line-up. It’s safe to say that the return of the same creative team to work on this second book of the trilogy is a reassuring thought as the sudden shift in artwork style wouldn’t have played a positive role on what is already a cont You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. After what was certainly the most disappointing story by Grant Morrison yet, we finally return to the provocative retelling of Wonder Woman’s origin story in this second volume of DC Comics’ Earth One graphic novel line-up. It’s safe to say that the return of the same creative team to work on this second book of the trilogy is a reassuring thought as the sudden shift in artwork style wouldn’t have played a positive role on what is already a controversial story arc for Diana Prince. With the foundation of this story set in a discourse on feminism, patriarchy and everything that shines bright in the news nowadays, there’s definitely a mystery behind Morrison’s direction and where he wishes to bring this series in terms of story-telling. It’s safe to say that Grant Morrison’s take on the character is one that won’t please the mass unanimously, but it does have the potential to trigger some much-needed reflection on issues we blatantly discuss in our everyday lives today. Following the events in the first volume, this graphic novel shows us Wonder Woman trying to change the world outside Paradise Island with her own vision of society melded through love and peace. While slowly becoming an icon for women, she also encounters several different oppositions in various forms, and notably, the American government and it’s men-filled structure. With threats that flourishes in their old ways in Man’s World, nothing Diana Prince wishes to accomplish is easy and everything comes at a price. Putting behind his nonlinear story-telling ways, Grant Morrison looks to further develop his clash of ideals through multiple perspectives while still keeping this retelling as shocking as possible. Will voicing your ideas be enough to convince the world for change or will Wonder Woman need to reinforce her words with action to get things done? While this Earth One series hasn’t been too successful in my books, it is quite courageous of Grant Morrison to stay loyal to Wonder Woman’s character roots and deliver such a story for fans of the hero to indulge. The second volume of this series continues to stay loyal to its predecessor, but actually builds up an intrigue that relentlessly tries to keep you hooked, even if it doesn’t always connect with the reader. The story still shoehorns a lot of social issues into play, with transsexualism and terrorism being some examples of ideas being integrated and questioned on a philosophical level. While interesting, they always felt like side dishes forced onto the reader to gulp up quickly without ever having the time to savour them. It was still fun, to some extent, to see how Wonder Woman deals with these issues that she has never seen on Paradise Island and how she strongly believes that they are inevitably the cause of men. The artwork is still pretty solid and continues to highlight Diana Prince’s confidence and charisma through her posture and smile. What Yanick Paquette and Nathan Fairbairn achieve is definitely gorgeous to the naked eye and makes it easy to breeze through their combined craft without second-guessing their designs. It sometimes even brought me to gaze at some of their designs for their mere creativity, such as the Wonder Niqab. While some might call it culture appropriation, the context made it slightly more appropriate and worth wondering how much Wonder Woman needs to do to adapt to international conflicts if she wants to get her beliefs through. The vibrant colours and the large panels—which in fact aren’t traditional square panels—also make it a lot easier to follow what’s going on without being lost in the narrative. It’s not easy to indulge a Wonder Woman that believes that men should kneel to feminism if they want to see world peace, but when you’ve grown on an isolated island with only women and have not known any form of war, it’s definitely easy to understand why Diana Prince is confident in her ways. But what is to come in the next story arc will surely shed more light on her understanding on Man’s World and its focus on cultural diversity and differences. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My thanks to NetGalley and DC Entertainment/DC Comics for an eARC copy of this to read and review. I love Wonder Woman, really love that character, so I read this with high hopes. They were dashed. Badly. SPOILERS beyond this point. 1) Nazis as bad guys. The entire book world has been SATURATED with the whole Nazis as the bad guys thing. From now on, unless the book is STELLAR, I am deducting one star whenever the Big Bad is the Nazis. Stop already, we get it, Nazis bad, everyone against them good My thanks to NetGalley and DC Entertainment/DC Comics for an eARC copy of this to read and review. I love Wonder Woman, really love that character, so I read this with high hopes. They were dashed. Badly. SPOILERS beyond this point. 1) Nazis as bad guys. The entire book world has been SATURATED with the whole Nazis as the bad guys thing. From now on, unless the book is STELLAR, I am deducting one star whenever the Big Bad is the Nazis. Stop already, we get it, Nazis bad, everyone against them good. Move on. 2) The artist can't draw hands to save their life. Wonder Woman has the WORST man/old lady/talon hands and it is really off putting and hard to not see once it is noticed. Ruined all of the rest of the decent art. Everyone else has badly drawn hands too, but hers were the worst. 3) Also, the Big Bad Dude was FUGLY. Not sure how he was supposed to be this amazing woman seducer. His mental powers weren't exactly wowing me. And I'm sorry, but we are shown exactly ONE scene between the Big Bad Dude and Wonder Woman and we are supposed to believe that he was able to mentally get into her head with rather poor conversation in that one time? So much so that when her friends were like, "He's a bad dude, can control the mind of people, specifically women," she IGNORES her trusted friends and is all like, "you're WRONG about him". No, nope nope nope-ity nope. Not MY Wonder Woman. She wouldn't have fallen for that poo in ONE conversation. 4) Back to the beginning re: Nazis attempting to invade the Amazon island paradise. We are told towards the end of this that NO ONE has made it to the island and left again to tell anyone about it (this is before WW leaves), so HOW IN THE HECK is the German Frau Hitler Super-Human saying to herself, "Ah yes, as our intelligence indicated, they speak Ancient Greek, they should be able to understand me when I speak this...." If NO ONE left the island once they found it, how is there ANY intelligence on this place and it's inhabitants?? 5) Also, I just LOVE how this story and the art were all done by men, and the view of the Amazon women only paradise and how they dealt with men is NOT what I would think would be a paradise thought of by women. The Amazons have these pink/purple rays that they shoot at the men that at first cause pain, but then seem to cause EXTREME pleasure. ("AAAHHHs become OH YEEEESSSS"). Then the men are sent to Aphrodite via some sort of transporter where the men are given the pleasure that they crave. Ew. That is SO not what I think a female paradise is all about. And of course all of the Amazonian chicks are into one another. Again, not all females would think that is paradise. Some would and more power to them, but not all. So not a paradise for all women. Sounds like a paradise for women thought up by a dude. What happens to the Nazi chick? She is forced to put on the "Venus Girdle" to bring her mind back to her female self, which also has some sort of "pleasure" giving dopamine. 6) Oh, and did you notice that I said the men were sent to Aphrodite, but she is wearing a girdle named after Venus. WHAT THE ABSOLUTE WHUT?!?!? Aphrodite is Greek, VENUS IS ROMAN. WHY ARE YOU MIXING TWO COMPLETELY DIFFERENT THINGS?!? Yes, Aphrodite and Venus are the same concept of love goddess, but different names from different cultures and didn't we establish with the Frau Hitler that the Amazon warrioresses speak GREEK?!?! 7) Oh yeah, and did I mention the Wonder hajib? It was ugly and gaudy and not sure why WW would have worn it. I get she was saving women in a Middle Eastern country, where that is traditional dress, but there is no WAY she was passing as a native in that get-up. So why wear it at all? It seemed kind of rude to me, but I am not from that area of the world, so maybe it is ok? They did get outside thoughts on the design of it, from a woman no less, so they did try to be thoughtful, but I think it missed the mark, at least it did with me. And her hands looked REALLY talon-like in these scenes. So distracting. 8) Also, men versus women trope. Men are fearful and want to maintain power, women are easily fooled by a smooth talking man. Can we PLEASE can the stereotypes? This just perpetuates the man vs. woman antagonism. It's not helping and may very well be hurting any attempt to actually bring about healing and peace where there is already a LOT of discord. Do we REALLY need another book of man vs woman? I'm done with all of that. Can't we just all get along? How hard can that be? Maybe the next volume shows world peace, BUT since the end of this is leading into a war between the Amazons and "men" (America's military, which is something else that irks me. At least it's not the Nazis though, so that's a plus. Sort of.) I somehow doubt we're going to get to peace, unless the Amazons have a HUGE pink/purple ray that they can engulf the world in. I doubt it, too easy a resolution. So, in short, (too late), this particular graphic novel was rather horrendous to this particular reader. YMMV, but I will not be recommending it to anyone. 1, very sad, star.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rabiaah Abdalreda

    Why do people rate something that has not been released yet ?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This was a very pleasant surprise. The first volume bordered on bad, to total misfire for me (and I usually like Morrison's work). Now the reason this installment in the proposed trilogy worked for me, well it could be something I'm misinterpreting. Because at some point around the 1/2-3/4 mark I really think Morrison was doing a satire. And, by today's standards he would probably be vilified for it (unless you're me). What do I think he was satirizing? The #MeToo, polyamory, pansexualism and sim This was a very pleasant surprise. The first volume bordered on bad, to total misfire for me (and I usually like Morrison's work). Now the reason this installment in the proposed trilogy worked for me, well it could be something I'm misinterpreting. Because at some point around the 1/2-3/4 mark I really think Morrison was doing a satire. And, by today's standards he would probably be vilified for it (unless you're me). What do I think he was satirizing? The #MeToo, polyamory, pansexualism and similar movements. Even if satire wasn't his intent, it came across that way to me, someone who's Twitter feed is quite liberal, at times find some of my friends have become knee jerk SJW liberals (I'm purposely using over broad general strokes here). So a little skewing here of that type of person, fine by me (personally I appreciate more those who can avoid knee jerk reactions). So if the above offends you, you should skip this piece, and frankly some might be critical of how Diana finally deals with Paula Van Gunther and Dr. Psycho (even though this version of Psycho actually is sleazier and more of a threat than the original). I liked Morrison's supporting character portrayals (Trevor, Etta and the Holiday Girls). The question is can Morrison provide a good conclusion to his story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Though I am not really a fan of the majority of Grant Morrison's work (stellar concepts, poor execution), I am enjoying his take on Wonder Woman in the Earth One graphic novel trilogy. Though totally contemporary in theme and art, there are more than a few nods to the Moulton-Marston/Peter-era -- I loved the appearance of Jumpa, Diana's pet kanga -- that provide evidence of Morrison's dedication to get to the heart of the characters. And Yanick Paquette's art is the perfect accompaniment for Mor Though I am not really a fan of the majority of Grant Morrison's work (stellar concepts, poor execution), I am enjoying his take on Wonder Woman in the Earth One graphic novel trilogy. Though totally contemporary in theme and art, there are more than a few nods to the Moulton-Marston/Peter-era -- I loved the appearance of Jumpa, Diana's pet kanga -- that provide evidence of Morrison's dedication to get to the heart of the characters. And Yanick Paquette's art is the perfect accompaniment for Morrison's script. His women are truly beautiful -- his Baroness Paula von Gunther brings to mind the art of Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez if it were distilled through the likes of Terry Dodson -- absolutely gorgeous! Can hardly wait for the announcement of Volume 3. Highly recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anubhav

    Suffers greatly from being the middle part of a trilogy. I don't think Grant knows what the hell he's talking about.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brandon St Mark

    Really enjoyed this issue! Liked the story a lot, and the ending was really good. Can't wait to see where the next volumes ends (since it's the last one, I believe). I think the more Morrison I read, I realize I either really love it, or don't care for it much at all. I read this in the DMV today and I felt a little nervous because there is a Nazi character in this book and so there were Nazi symbols in it and I didn't want any stranger walking by me to get the wrong idea lol I did see one review Really enjoyed this issue! Liked the story a lot, and the ending was really good. Can't wait to see where the next volumes ends (since it's the last one, I believe). I think the more Morrison I read, I realize I either really love it, or don't care for it much at all. I read this in the DMV today and I felt a little nervous because there is a Nazi character in this book and so there were Nazi symbols in it and I didn't want any stranger walking by me to get the wrong idea lol I did see one review where someone didn't like how Morrison handled feminism/modern social issues, and I guess maybe if they were expecting some long Tumblresque thought piece then I can understand, but otherwise I thought Morrison did a good job. He didn't really go too deep into it, but he also didn't make a joke out of it either. I thought it was handled well enough. And Dr. Psycho was a total scumbag, but I like how his character play into this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel López

    Superior al anterior volumen en ejecución pero, sobre todo, en ideas, integrando personajes de la historia de los cómics con el mundo en que vivimos de manera más interesante y provocadora, dejando un poco de lado algunos asuntos que podían echar para atrás a la gente (aunque a mí me parecieron consecuentes) y abrazando el espíritu de Wonder Woman como casi nadie lo ha hecho últimamente. Esperando el siguiente volumen que ojalá concluya la historia y nl tarde tanto 👍🏻

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    WHAT IN THE EVERLIVING FUCK DID I JUST READ

  13. 5 out of 5

    Minerva

    Why did I fool myself into thinking that volume 2 might be any better after I so thoroughly disliked volume 1? This series continues to frustrate me to no end by assiduously borrowing from all of the aesthetics and basic concepts of Marston's original Golden Age Wonder Woman stories while completely ignoring the messages at that Marston was trying to convey. The Amazons aren't just superior to men because of their advanced technology and strength- they are also morally superior because they are i Why did I fool myself into thinking that volume 2 might be any better after I so thoroughly disliked volume 1? This series continues to frustrate me to no end by assiduously borrowing from all of the aesthetics and basic concepts of Marston's original Golden Age Wonder Woman stories while completely ignoring the messages at that Marston was trying to convey. The Amazons aren't just superior to men because of their advanced technology and strength- they are also morally superior because they are innately more capable of empathy, kindness, and selflessness than men, a point that Morrison's portrayal of the Themyscira misses so badly. Frankly, with the exception of Etta Candy, who I think is actually pretty great, the portrayal of all the female characters in this series is straight-up insulting. Diana is gullible, impulsive, and arrogant, with very little internal depth or development, and Hippolyta and the rest of the Amazons are all portrayed as shrill, man-hating, and body-shaming. Which I'm sure has nothing to do with the fact that this series was written by a man. And no get me started on the shallow, confused attempts to tie this book to modern politics and feminist movements. I know that Morrison is widely considered to be a great comic book writer, but this my only experience with his work so far and I'm not very impressed. I have noticed that a lot of male writers who are praised for their takes on iconic male superheroes struggle when they try to tackle female characters, and I feel like this book really could have been great if a woman had written it. After all of the time I spent researching the history of Wonder Woman for my essay, I have gained a great understanding and appreciation for those weird, goofy Golden Age comicss. I am fascinated by the idea of trying to update those stories for the modern day (also, complaints aside, Paquette's art is GORGEOUS to the point where I almost gave this book another star, just for it), and even like the idea of trying to honor Marston's bizzarre, slightly dubious metaphors about bondage and submission. But Wonder Woman Earth One fails due to a fundamental misunderstanding of both Diana's character and the characters of the Amazons, and I really do wish that a talented female writer had been given the reins on this book so that it could live up to its potential.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Featherston

    "Wonder Woman Earth 2" continues with Diana beginning her mission in "Man's World" in earnest. As I had hoped, volume 2 shows us a Wonder Woman with more of her characteristic compassion and idealism than we saw in the previous volume, while remaining a version of the character that is clearly the product of an alien culture with values that conflict with our own. After all, isn't William Moulton Marston's original vision of a gynocentric culture with superior technology and a harsh warrior ethi "Wonder Woman Earth 2" continues with Diana beginning her mission in "Man's World" in earnest. As I had hoped, volume 2 shows us a Wonder Woman with more of her characteristic compassion and idealism than we saw in the previous volume, while remaining a version of the character that is clearly the product of an alien culture with values that conflict with our own. After all, isn't William Moulton Marston's original vision of a gynocentric culture with superior technology and a harsh warrior ethic the very definition of the feared "Feminazi" caricature of feminism that haunts the internet? When that specter is granted real political and military power, is becomes a real threat for dark forces in the US government who begin to engineer Diana's downfall. Morrison writes Diana as an almost tragic character, blind to the polarizing nature of the philosophy she pushes, unacquainted with concerns of privilege or personal autonomy outside of "loving submission" to a benign authority, and too excited by the possibilities of her newfound celebrity to sense any danger inherent in living a public life. While other writers have tried to take Wonder Woman's politics and blend them neatly with whatever ideas of gender are palatable or popular at the time, Morrison's Wonder Woman wants us and our world to change in uncomfortable and unwelcome ways. Morrison draws from Wonder Woman's Golden Age stories, reinventing characters, abandoned aspects of the mythology, and classic villains such as Nazi Baroness Paula von Gunter and Doctor Psycho. The prologue depicting a German invasion of Paradise Island reads like a lost issue by Marston himself. Yanick Paquette's art is beautiful as always, with strong, confident line work developing ornamental elements enhancing many double page spreads while never compromising his expressive character work and storytelling. A worthy continuation of his work on volume 1, this is a book you will want to revisit again and again. Many contemporary superhero comics have attempted a realistic depiction of how a superhero would contend with our antagonistic mass media and identity politics. Morrison goes a step further, giving us a version of Diana and her mission that will polarize even her most dedicated readers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard Guion

    I didn't like the story in Wonder Woman Earth One Vol 1 very much. I may have to revisit that now as I found Vol 2 to be pretty good! A lot of fun, with two villains for Diana. The artwork by Yanick Paquette is gorgeously detailed, as was the first volume. The story ends on a surprising note and there is already a Vol 3 in the works.

  16. 5 out of 5

    TheYALibrarian

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow was this just a mess. The first one was already weird but let's just add super human Nazis into the mix. Not to mention how Wonder Woman got all drooly over a guy and never suspected or was even able to figure out mind control. I can go on but this was just...ugh

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kend

    Here is yet another gorgeous volume from one of the most prolific and respected DC comic creators currently working, Grant Morrison, and the talented Yanick Paquette. The artwork does a stellar job of showcasing the power of Diana without over-sexualizing her, which makes for an interesting contrast to the overarching theme of this volume--a volume which touches once more upon the difficulties of integrating the Amazonian mindset of peaceful submission to a loving authority into the world of men Here is yet another gorgeous volume from one of the most prolific and respected DC comic creators currently working, Grant Morrison, and the talented Yanick Paquette. The artwork does a stellar job of showcasing the power of Diana without over-sexualizing her, which makes for an interesting contrast to the overarching theme of this volume--a volume which touches once more upon the difficulties of integrating the Amazonian mindset of peaceful submission to a loving authority into the world of men, which is ruled by military patriarchies. I'd give this more stars, only it's kind of gross to subject Wonder Woman to yet another "seduced by a powerful man" narrative while also having her be betrayed by a woman whose love for her is unrequited. I mean, it's great having a woman be one of the many villains and all, but to render sapphic love as cause for betrayal and the death of an important Amazonian figure is incredibly, incredibly gross. Romantic love between women has historically been perceived as a threat to the "natural order" of our male-dominated world; here it is also a threat to a female-dominated culture. We've had enough of that narrative, thank you very much. The Male Gaze lives on, unfortunately.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    The second volume of Wonder Woman: Earth One sees the significant talent behind it mostly treading water in the middle installment of a planned trilogy. After a World War II flashback that sees the Baroness Paula von Gunther lead a failed Nazi attack on the Amazons’ home island, the action shifts to Diana in the present day, a newly minted multi-media celebrity. She attracts a devoted following by preaching peace and female empowerment, even as her secret reports to her mother suggest a more mili The second volume of Wonder Woman: Earth One sees the significant talent behind it mostly treading water in the middle installment of a planned trilogy. After a World War II flashback that sees the Baroness Paula von Gunther lead a failed Nazi attack on the Amazons’ home island, the action shifts to Diana in the present day, a newly minted multi-media celebrity. She attracts a devoted following by preaching peace and female empowerment, even as her secret reports to her mother suggest a more militant Amazon agenda. Factions in the U.S. military come to fear Diana and turn to Maxwell Lord and Dr. Psycho to undermine her. After a disastrous public meltdown, a personal tragedy sends Diana home, as the world teeters on the brink of war with the Amazons. Writer Grant Morrison is one of the most celebrated writers in the comic book medium and he brings his patented fascination with incorporating all the far-flung, often contradictory, bits of a character’s long history to his treatment of Wonder Woman. Elements like female empowerment and non-traditional gender and sexual identities are certainly timely, but often don’t feel handled in an especially elegant way, as though they were mere items on a checklist to be included in a progressive reimagining of Wonder Woman. More interesting is Morrison’s take on typical fanboy tropes, examining various “If Wonder Woman is/then why” arguments. Morrison’s greatest triumph is characterization, especially his handling of Diana. She’s allowed to be complex and imperfect, not the “virgin saint” icon she’s often been painted as. With layers, nuance and suggestions that she’s far less naïve then assumed, Morrison makes Diana a strong central character with agency. His take on Dr. Psycho as a contemporary purveyor of toxic masculinity is both timely and a sensible use of the villain’s long history. Other characters don’t make as much of an impact, but the Diana/Dr. Psycho interplay is strong enough to hold a reader’s interest. Volume 2 plays like a series of connected vignettes, ending on a cliffhanger that promises to wrap up all the themes Morrison has been working thus far. That may make the complete trilogy more impactful, but can’t help but make this outing feel like a typical “middle chapter,” with the big finish promising more fireworks than are supplied here. The best reason to take in Volume 2 is the art team of Yanick Paquette and Nathan Fairbairn, who craft a kaleidoscopic visual feast for the reader. The duo make the proceedings bright and big, smartly working in various references to the visual iconography from the character’s long history. Paquette’s design work is beyond stunning here; in addition to the imaginative take on Amazonian tech and architecture, he’s carefully crafted the look of each page, using a fluid approach to panel and page construction that eschews the typical box format with lovingly rendered panels that promote a real flow to the action, where even the panel borders are rendered with care and thoughtfulness to promote overall visual impact. Paquette’s Diana remains strong and confident, entirely expressive and brimming with power, but also suffused with regrets, longing and even playfulness. He nails her shifting moods and concocts some truly inspired costuming riffs that incorporate decades of the character’s visual presentation. Fairbairn wraps it all in bright, warm colors that make even the darker sections stand out crisply and cleanly. At its best, the work calls to mind the legendary Trina Robbins, which is no small amount of praise for Paquette and Fairbairn. One really needs to have read Volume 1 before diving into Volume 2, and even then, be prepared for the lengthy wait for the next installment. This isn’t a complete reading experience on its own, but as the middle part of a trilogy, it manages the pitfalls inherent in such a set-up well enough to be worth a reader’s time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    Grant Morrison's greatest ability as a writer is to go places few if any others are willing to go. With Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 2, he's managed to tell the tale of the post-Trump era no one else has dared tackle. I'm not talking about reactive responses but confronting it head-on. And he doesn't do it in a confrontational manner, either, which is itself remarkable in this age. The election of Donald Trump to the presidency of the United States was an immediate lightning rod, an event so une Grant Morrison's greatest ability as a writer is to go places few if any others are willing to go. With Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 2, he's managed to tell the tale of the post-Trump era no one else has dared tackle. I'm not talking about reactive responses but confronting it head-on. And he doesn't do it in a confrontational manner, either, which is itself remarkable in this age. The election of Donald Trump to the presidency of the United States was an immediate lightning rod, an event so unexpected that even months of endless chatter preceding it couldn't prepare anyone for the reality of it actually happening. And that's, essentially, how Morrison treats Vol. 2 as compared to Vol. 1 of his epic Wonder Woman vision (everything he does he has an epic vision for). Vol. 1 was all setup. Vol. 2 is delivery. Morrison usually approaches his topics by getting to the root of the original idea. Wonder Woman has settled into the role of the most iconic female superhero over the years, but originally she was conceived as the prototypical feminist ideal, even as creator William Moulton Marston surrounded her with stereotypes of totems of chauvinist control, ideas of submission and control that fell by the wayside even as their symbols (the Lasso of Truth, for instance) remained visible and trademark elements of Wonder Woman's adventures. Morrison decided he wasn't go to let they remain latent any longer. He was going to go out and talk about them, unabashedly. That's what the modern era is all about, an unapologetic presentation of everything we represent. So his Wonder Woman is by definition a provocation, whose "mission to Man's World" includes empowerment seminars, not mere superheroics. And yet just as inevitably, she's a provocation that, well, provokes. Instead of helping women feel better, live better lives, and assert themselves, she seems to advocate revolution, which is to say, anyone who's threatened by her starts having an itchy trigger finger. (Heh. Trigger warning. Doesn't seem so funny.) Of course, there's a villain, Dr. Pyscho, ready and willing to manipulate the circumstances, fan the flames. And that, I think, is ultimately Morrison's critique, that our age is all about fanning the flames, regardless of what you happen to think. The villain always suits the times. There's also a Nazi, because with comics there's always a Nazi somewhere. Wonder Woman and Captain America, in particular, drag them wherever they go, being unique among superheroes in still having a foothold in the times they were originally created. The Nazi element also serves as a callback to Morrison's own Zenith, and as such you can see where he isn't merely speaking to today but reflecting back on themes he's written about his whole career. And as such, despite what we might think, we're not living in as unique times as we imagine, and maybe that's part of his message, too. Bold literature doesn't merely reflect a mirror to reluctant readers, but reminds us that the story has already been told, and that it must be retold because for all its faults and aspirations, change takes a great deal of time and effort, and that's something Morrison says directly in this story, even as we so often forget it. So we need reminders, in forms that are difficult to forget. I think Grant Morrison has made something that's suitably unforgettable, a timely and timeless version of an old character made suddenly relevant and vibrant. The villains reflect the times, but the heroes rise to the occasion, too.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Oh crikey Moses. After lauding the first book in this series, which was fine in and of itself and really didn't need padding out to a trilogy, we get this. And it's not only bad, but reprehensible, in every way. We open with a hybrid of Marilyn Monroe and Power Girl trying to capture Themyscira for Hitler, only for her entire Nazi army to get zapped by something violet-coloured and turned into wincy nothings groaning in the surf like it's the world's hottest orgy. Power Monroe says she now only Oh crikey Moses. After lauding the first book in this series, which was fine in and of itself and really didn't need padding out to a trilogy, we get this. And it's not only bad, but reprehensible, in every way. We open with a hybrid of Marilyn Monroe and Power Girl trying to capture Themyscira for Hitler, only for her entire Nazi army to get zapped by something violet-coloured and turned into wincy nothings groaning in the surf like it's the world's hottest orgy. Power Monroe says she now only wants to serve the island's Queen. Jump forward a bit, and modern day Diana is facing the whole world's demands for sexual equality – oh, and for trannies to be allowed to call themselves Amazons too, while we're all at it. She's even set up a Million Woman March – which the bigwigs in the Pentagon don't like. Oh, and while she's gallivanting around with Steve (a person of colour, if you remember) she's also gone and invented herself a Wonderburka, so she can rescue women from Islamic terrorists. This must count as the most "woke" WW title ever. And it's utter bull. Turning this iconic figure into an icon for the author's goody-goody liberalism is a travesty through and through. These books are supposed to be entertainment, not polemics. How can you have one of the bustier WW for decades on one page, and her kowtowing to asinine Islamic expectations on another? It becomes instantly clear why the prologue featured one of Hitler's Aryan best – because clearly we're all Nazis if we're going to call any of this out as shit. Yup, I'm a Nazi then. Because this is shit. I wanted to stop reading at the start of every scene, but it was real driving-past-a-pileup thing, travelling mile after mile past mangled wreckage of what was a perfectly fine car in the hope of seeing the last person still speeding along the road in ignorance just manage to swerve to avoid the collision with fate at the end. Diana has always been about helping everyone – about putting herself out and putting herself about to save the world for us all. But when the baddy here is so blatantly Mr White Male Man, she loses all credibility as a token figure. This book dumps on 70 years of her history, and should not exist. Zero stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

    This to me was an improvement from the boring Vol. 1 yet still a misstep overall. I'm a big fan of Grant, and was extremely excited for this long-gestating project. Yet, it comes off as an older white guy, well-intentioned but writing in broad strokes a bit too much. This ramps up the Marston angle (particularly with the Dr. Psyhco PUA/Incel angle) yet it's almost a bit demeaning. The writing of Dr. Psycho comes off as almost a bit laughable--while I appreciate the angle that he's almost like Vl This to me was an improvement from the boring Vol. 1 yet still a misstep overall. I'm a big fan of Grant, and was extremely excited for this long-gestating project. Yet, it comes off as an older white guy, well-intentioned but writing in broad strokes a bit too much. This ramps up the Marston angle (particularly with the Dr. Psyhco PUA/Incel angle) yet it's almost a bit demeaning. The writing of Dr. Psycho comes off as almost a bit laughable--while I appreciate the angle that he's almost like Vladislav Surkov. It's not anywhere as near or challenging as I expected and kind of plays up the #metoo movement and feels a bit pat at this point (Morrison claims the script was already written before. It's not a terrible work, just misguided and disappointing. I will read Vol. 3 but this isn't terribly encouraging, especially when the dirth of Wonder Woman material no longer exists (i.e. Azzarello, Rucka, Thompson, de Liz and the upcoming G. Willow Wilson runs have occurred since then)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Megan Farve

    I received a copy of this graphic novel from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. I thoroughly enjoy reading Wonder Woman graphic novels, but I did not find myself as enthralled by this volume as I was in the first one. While I found Diana’s scuffle with Dr. Psycho to be interesting and a wonderful throwback to her early days, I was not as invested in this story as I was in the first volume or in the New 52 series. However, this novel was still worth the read and I am curious where I received a copy of this graphic novel from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. I thoroughly enjoy reading Wonder Woman graphic novels, but I did not find myself as enthralled by this volume as I was in the first one. While I found Diana’s scuffle with Dr. Psycho to be interesting and a wonderful throwback to her early days, I was not as invested in this story as I was in the first volume or in the New 52 series. However, this novel was still worth the read and I am curious where they will go from here. I would recommend this novel to others who appreciate Wonder Woman and to those who enjoy recreations of characters and storylines. The art was pleasurable and I very much enjoyed seeing Wonder Woman respect another’s culture by donning a burka in the beginning of the novel while overseas.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    Always with the mixed feelings about Grant Morrison. This one's pretty jumbled, and it's not a conclusion, which kind of sucks when there's this much hype and this much wait between the two chapters. I never feel like we're not helping Grant work through his feelings about things, and this one feels like English Punk struggles with the Me Too Movement. It's not bad, but it is preachy, and relies a lot on group political assumptions and stereotypes. It's fun to watch his WW do her thing, and the Always with the mixed feelings about Grant Morrison. This one's pretty jumbled, and it's not a conclusion, which kind of sucks when there's this much hype and this much wait between the two chapters. I never feel like we're not helping Grant work through his feelings about things, and this one feels like English Punk struggles with the Me Too Movement. It's not bad, but it is preachy, and relies a lot on group political assumptions and stereotypes. It's fun to watch his WW do her thing, and the art is gorgeous again, and the story, if it goes somewhere worth going, will probably have been worth it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Willie

    This is my second of Grant Morrison's Earth One books and I still don't know how to feel about them... are they feminist? Are they sexist? It's hard to tell when you have a male author writing about pickup artist getting beat up but also a suspicious amount of female bondage scenes. That didn't make me give this book three stars though. The three stars were because the plot seemed to move so slowly in the middle and then so quickly in the end that I was shocked when it was over. This book felt li This is my second of Grant Morrison's Earth One books and I still don't know how to feel about them... are they feminist? Are they sexist? It's hard to tell when you have a male author writing about pickup artist getting beat up but also a suspicious amount of female bondage scenes. That didn't make me give this book three stars though. The three stars were because the plot seemed to move so slowly in the middle and then so quickly in the end that I was shocked when it was over. This book felt like it's only purpose was to set up book three, and I wanted more than that.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jota Houses

    La linea Earth one es una especie de universo Ultimate para DC, presentando a sus grandes héroes adaptados a la actualidad y rompiendo con la continuidad establecida. Como lo hacen cada poco en la serie regular con sus Crisis y Renacimientos tampoco sorprende. El comic de Wonder Woman, a diferencia del de Superman, tiene un gran dibujo y un guión bien trabajado que le da un aire fresco a la historia y está lleno de homenajes a la etapa clásica del personaje (ausentes en la épica versión de Perez La linea Earth one es una especie de universo Ultimate para DC, presentando a sus grandes héroes adaptados a la actualidad y rompiendo con la continuidad establecida. Como lo hacen cada poco en la serie regular con sus Crisis y Renacimientos tampoco sorprende. El comic de Wonder Woman, a diferencia del de Superman, tiene un gran dibujo y un guión bien trabajado que le da un aire fresco a la historia y está lleno de homenajes a la etapa clásica del personaje (ausentes en la épica versión de Perez y en la olvidable de Azarello). Y eso que es de Morrison.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ramon

    Paquette is really one of the best artists to ever depict Diana, and it shows here. Great panel compositions and page layouts, too. Interesting use of Dr. Psycho as a gaslighter/hypnotist/PUA, though the story could've started earlier. It takes a while to really "begin." Hoping the final part of the trilogy doesn't take too long to get to us. The gap between vols. 1 & 2 was a bit much.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Doherty

    I love the art in this book and how it incorporates the lasso into the whole book. It has some amazing things that I never thought I would see in a comic book, but I wasn't as interested in the story as I thought I would be. Still recommend it and I am really excited for the conclusion to the series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Loki

    Another great book from Morrison - the reimagining of Dr Psycho as an NLP-using MRA is particularly inspired, and the format allows this book to go some places that the regular title couldn't. Yanick Paquette's art remains absolutely gorgeous, making Diana look beautiful rather than sexy, and drawing regular people who look like regular people. Highly recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert Morganbesser

    The usual brilliance of Grant Morrison I've been a Grant Morrison fan for many years. This is one of his greatest works. An absolutely brilliant retelling of Wonder Woman, this sequel is even better than the original. No spoilers, just if one is a Wonder Woman or Morrison fan, read this. Read it now! Just great. Now where's part three?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    There's a lot about this trade I'm mixed on, from the incel-y Dr. Psycho (a dead giveaway upon his introduction) to Uberfraulien to discussions of Wonder Woman's accouterments. (e-galley from Netgalley)

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