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The Lost Order

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The Lost Order continues renowned New York Times top 5 bestseller Steve Berry’s Cotton Malone series with another riveting, history-based thriller. The Knights of the Golden Circle, founded on July 4, 1854, was the largest, most dangerous clandestine organization in American history. It formulated grand plans—to expand the United States, change the constitutional landscap The Lost Order continues renowned New York Times top 5 bestseller Steve Berry’s Cotton Malone series with another riveting, history-based thriller. The Knights of the Golden Circle, founded on July 4, 1854, was the largest, most dangerous clandestine organization in American history. It formulated grand plans—to expand the United States, change the constitutional landscape, and forge a Southern empire, enslaving a ‘golden circle’ spanning two continents. To finance its goals, the Order amassed an amazing trove of stolen gold and silver, which they buried in hidden caches across the United States. Treasure hunters have searched for decades, but have never found any of the Order’s major hoards.Now, 160 years later, the knights still exist. Two factions within the Order want the treasure—one to spend it, the other to preserve it. Thrust into that civil war is former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone.Starting with a hunt for clues inside the Smithsonian Institution, Malone discovers that an ancestor within his own family may hold the key to everything: a Confederate spy named Owen “Cotton” Payne. Complicating matters further are the political ambitions of a ruthless Speaker of the House and the widow of a United States Senator, who have plans of their own—plans that conflict in every way with the Order.From the quiet back rooms of the Smithsonian, to the dangers of rural Arkansas, and finally into the rugged mountains of northern New Mexico, The Lost Order is a perilous adventure into our country’s dark past, and a potentially darker future.


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The Lost Order continues renowned New York Times top 5 bestseller Steve Berry’s Cotton Malone series with another riveting, history-based thriller. The Knights of the Golden Circle, founded on July 4, 1854, was the largest, most dangerous clandestine organization in American history. It formulated grand plans—to expand the United States, change the constitutional landscap The Lost Order continues renowned New York Times top 5 bestseller Steve Berry’s Cotton Malone series with another riveting, history-based thriller. The Knights of the Golden Circle, founded on July 4, 1854, was the largest, most dangerous clandestine organization in American history. It formulated grand plans—to expand the United States, change the constitutional landscape, and forge a Southern empire, enslaving a ‘golden circle’ spanning two continents. To finance its goals, the Order amassed an amazing trove of stolen gold and silver, which they buried in hidden caches across the United States. Treasure hunters have searched for decades, but have never found any of the Order’s major hoards.Now, 160 years later, the knights still exist. Two factions within the Order want the treasure—one to spend it, the other to preserve it. Thrust into that civil war is former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone.Starting with a hunt for clues inside the Smithsonian Institution, Malone discovers that an ancestor within his own family may hold the key to everything: a Confederate spy named Owen “Cotton” Payne. Complicating matters further are the political ambitions of a ruthless Speaker of the House and the widow of a United States Senator, who have plans of their own—plans that conflict in every way with the Order.From the quiet back rooms of the Smithsonian, to the dangers of rural Arkansas, and finally into the rugged mountains of northern New Mexico, The Lost Order is a perilous adventure into our country’s dark past, and a potentially darker future.

30 review for The Lost Order

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrice Hoffman

    I practically spent my entire Sunday trying to get through Steve Berry's latest Cotton Malone historical thriller. In the interest of full disclosure, I'm usually Berry's biggest fan. I always look forward to reading the adventures of the least retired, retired Magellan Billet recruit than the next person. The Malone series is always packed full of thrills, close calls, double crosses, and pure excitement. The Lost Order on the other hand, I sadly must admit, was not my favorite Berry read. Where I practically spent my entire Sunday trying to get through Steve Berry's latest Cotton Malone historical thriller. In the interest of full disclosure, I'm usually Berry's biggest fan. I always look forward to reading the adventures of the least retired, retired Magellan Billet recruit than the next person. The Malone series is always packed full of thrills, close calls, double crosses, and pure excitement. The Lost Order on the other hand, I sadly must admit, was not my favorite Berry read. Where do I start? Cotton Malone is roped into a mystery that dates back to the Civil War and could lead to millions in buried treasure. Of course, his efforts are thwarted and he ends up coming between a secret group that's sole purpose is to protect the treasure and mercenaries who only want the gold. We're introduced to all the players, good and bad, early in the The Lost Order which isn't entirely unexpected. Berry's novels can get a little crowded if you're not familiar with his writing style. He has multiple plots going that all seem thinly connected. Where he excels is in how the individual stories come together. This formula works for him. I'm not ragging on that. What makes this my least favorite in the Malone series is the fact that there wasn't much to the main plot to keep me invested. Yes, Danny Daniels efforts to investigate his good friends' death and evil widow just weren't that interesting. I felt that everyone was running in circles for so long. And each story was halted by some sort of inescapable moment that ended up being brief and not worth the two chapters in between that held that plot line in suspense. The problem is mostly me. I expect more from one of my favorite author Steve Berry. Instead, I got a lackluster plot line, with even more lackluster subplots as fluff. I believe that fans of the Cotton Malone series will still read this one and may even enjoy it a lot more than I did. Cheers to those who don't want to search far and wide for a buried treasure of a better read than The Lost Order Copy provided by St. Martin's Press via Netgalley

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Great read by Berry! I loved the history that gets added to the story line and the fast paced nature of Berry's books. Can't wait to read the next Malone adventure!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I really love Cotton Malone. This entry into the series was no exception! Even though I predicted quite a few of the big twists and reveals, it was still a rollicking fun ride.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I have read a few books in this series. After reading this most recent book, I realize that I really do need to go back and read all of the missing books. I breezed through this book with great speed as I was very engaged with what I was reading. The mystery regarding the Knights of the Golden Circle and the mystery surround billions in lost gold was intriguing. This story may have been fiction but it is not that far unbelievable to imagine that this could be a story ripped right from the histor I have read a few books in this series. After reading this most recent book, I realize that I really do need to go back and read all of the missing books. I breezed through this book with great speed as I was very engaged with what I was reading. The mystery regarding the Knights of the Golden Circle and the mystery surround billions in lost gold was intriguing. This story may have been fiction but it is not that far unbelievable to imagine that this could be a story ripped right from the history books. Cotton is on top of his game. He stood toe to toe with everyone he met and if he did get knocked down he was not down for long. There was plenty of drama and a few surprises to keep the story interesting as well as moving along at a good pace. This book had the mix of the National Treasure and the Mummy movie. The Lost Order is worth its currency in gold.

  5. 4 out of 5

    The Real Book Spy

    Read this review and more at www.TheRealBookSpy.com With a new president in office and the future of the Magellan Billet still somewhat in doubt, Cotton Malone accepts what is supposed to be an easy job from the Smithsonian that turns out to be anything but. Leaving his bookstore in Denmark, Malone, the former operator for the justice department’s top-secret intelligence agency, heads to Arkansas with Cassiopeia Vitt, his lover and fellow Magellan Billet agent. Together they were dispatched to i Read this review and more at www.TheRealBookSpy.com With a new president in office and the future of the Magellan Billet still somewhat in doubt, Cotton Malone accepts what is supposed to be an easy job from the Smithsonian that turns out to be anything but. Leaving his bookstore in Denmark, Malone, the former operator for the justice department’s top-secret intelligence agency, heads to Arkansas with Cassiopeia Vitt, his lover and fellow Magellan Billet agent. Together they were dispatched to investigate at a location where another Smithsonian employee had been searching for treasure before being scared off by a local man named Terry Morse. On-site, Cotton does, indeed, find a few gold coins before coming face-to-face with Morse who, along with his granddaughter, Lea, has been protecting the land and its hidden treasure for decades. Cotton learns that the treasure belonged to the Knights of the Golden Circle, a Confederate spy ring that was assembled before the Civil War. And while the Knights were thought to no longer be in existence, Morse claims the Order is alive and well, though significantly smaller in numbers than in its original heyday. Morse, who only spills the secrets to stay out of jail, claims to be a sentinel–charged with protecting a portion of the $100 billion in gold and silver the Knights had assembled–just like his father, and his grandfather, and many others before him. Cotton knows plenty about the Knights of the Golden Circle himself, having heard stories about the Order from his father when he was a child. But as he continues to learn more about parties involved, he’s not entirely sure who he can trust, as everyone seems to have a separate agenda and an unwillingness to tell him the truth. Meanwhile, Stephanie Nelle, the Magellan Billet’s acting chief, is called in to investigate after the Smithsonian is broken into. It doesn’t take long for her to realize that both she and Cotton are after the same people–who are trying to find the Knights’ long lost gold by following a treasure map that’s broken into five parts, some of which are hidden in plain sight. While Malone and Nelle each chase their own leads, former president Danny Daniels mourns the loss of his close friend Alex Sherwood, a sitting Tennessee senator who died under suspicious circumstances. Sherwood’s widow, Diane, gives Danny reason to suspect something foul is going on, prompting him to investigate on his own. Daniels ends up uncovering a huge government conspiracy (one that his friend may have died to help expose) that involves a plan to exploit Article I of the United States Constitution, which would give the Speaker of the House more power than the president. Unfortunately, aside from the notoriety that comes with being a former president, Daniels no longer has any real power to do anything about what he’s learned. To get back into the game, Danny comes up with a genius way to go from ordinary citizen to someone of importance, then vows to stop Speaker Lucius Vance and Diane Sherwood from pulling off their plan. For longtime fans concerned that Daniels’ role will be diminished now that he’s no longer the president, you don’t have to worry about that. While Cotton Malone remains the star of the series, Daniels has a large role in this one and he steals every scene he’s in. Plus, the way in which the author makes Danny relevant again is nothing short of brilliant. On top of showing readers a new side to Danny, who is reenergized by his latest political fight, Steve Berry also finally reveals the origin of Cotton’s nickname, something longtime fans of his series have wondered about for years. (Hint: it’s a two-part answer!) With multiple high-tension plot threads playing out, one of which turns deeply personal for Cotton, all the characters’ paths eventually cross as they work together to solve century-old clues in order to stop a secret shadow government and a murderous couple hellbent on finding the Knights’ lost treasure. Steve Berry masterfully weaves historical fiction into a present day high-concept plot that moves at breakneck speeds from beginning to end. While last year’s The 14th Colony was good, The Lost Order, which falls somewhere between Three Days to the Condor and National Treasure, is Berry’s best work yet–and is sure to compete for best novel of the year. With nonstop action and a story packed full of conspiracies, assassins, power-hungry politicians, murder, and lost treasure, the latest Cotton Malone thriller is impossible to put down! Book Details Author: Steve Berry Series: Cotton Malone #12 Pages: 512 (Hardcover) ISBN: 1476799253 Publisher: Minotaur Books Release Date: April 4, 2017 Order Now: http://amzn.to/2l1JKC0

  6. 4 out of 5

    David Eppenstein

    You should know that I am a Berry fan. I follow and collect Steve Berry's books so I might not be the most objective source for an evaluation of his work. All of his books are high on action and adventure which is fun but that wouldn't be enough to keep me interested for very long. What I love about Steve's work is that all of his adventures are premised upon some historic fact, legend, or myth that he then weaves into an action packed adventure for the reader. Since there is a definite history You should know that I am a Berry fan. I follow and collect Steve Berry's books so I might not be the most objective source for an evaluation of his work. All of his books are high on action and adventure which is fun but that wouldn't be enough to keep me interested for very long. What I love about Steve's work is that all of his adventures are premised upon some historic fact, legend, or myth that he then weaves into an action packed adventure for the reader. Since there is a definite history angle to these adventures the reader is in the position of learning something as well as being entertained and this book is no exception. The adventure in "Lost Order" is based upon an obscure secret Southern Brotherhood started in the 1850's. Berry morphs this organization into a secret society whose purpose was to amass a great deal of wealth starting with part or all of the gold reserves of the Confederate States following the Civil War. This wealth was to be hidden and protected by the Brotherhood in order to fund another rising of the South. Coupled with this was an additional political plot device involving rules of procedure in the U.S. House of Representatives and the process of amending the Constitution by calling a constitutional convention. That might sound rather dry and dull to many but not the way Berry presents them in his adventure. If you are a history buff and need a little change of reading pace but can't seem to break the history habit then Berry is an author you should try. Enjoy, I did.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    Cotton Malone is asked by the Smithonian Institution to investigate the Knights of the Golden Circle, a pre-Civil War organization aimed at changing the nature of the US government. They have two divergent aims - change the Constitution through a constitutional convention and locate their Civil War treasure. Ex-president Daniel's friend, dies a mysterious death, and numerous other deaths occur.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    this is one of the better ones in the recent series with a mixture of history and thriller as the story takes in a lost order created just before the civil war and hoarded a vast lost treasure which both sects of that modern order are searching for one to keep in hidden and the other to change the house senate/congress. enter cotton malone who great great grandfather is the key to the whole puzzle, fast paced and doesn't disappoint.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tom Tischler

    The Knights of the Golden Circle was the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history, it amassed billions in stolen gold and silver all buried in hidden caches across the U.S. Since 1865 hunters have searched but little has been found. Now one hundred and sixty years later two factions of what remains of the Knights want that treasure - one to spend it for their own ends , the other to preserve it. Thrust into this battle is former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone w The Knights of the Golden Circle was the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history, it amassed billions in stolen gold and silver all buried in hidden caches across the U.S. Since 1865 hunters have searched but little has been found. Now one hundred and sixty years later two factions of what remains of the Knights want that treasure - one to spend it for their own ends , the other to preserve it. Thrust into this battle is former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone whose connection to the Knights is far deeper than he ever imagined. The center is the Smithsonian Institution linked to the Knights treasure and Malone himself through an ancestor, a Confederate spy named Angus "Cotton" Adams whose story holds the key to everything. Complicating this are the political ambitions of a reckless Speaker of the House and the bitter widow of a Senator who together are planning radical changes to the country. And while Cassiopeia Vett and Malone face the past ex president Danny Daniels and Stephanie Nelle confront a new and unexpected challenge, a threat that may cost one of them their life. This is book 12 in the Cotton Malone series and as per all Steve Berry's books even if you don't care for the story you will get a history lesson. I myself enjoyed it and gave it a 5.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I like Cotton Malone; I always look forward to a new volume in this series, but I didn't find this one as appealing as the others. Danny is no longer president, and author Berry tried to keep him in the story with a new role that was prompted by his love interest Stephanie's injury, but the book lacked the oomph that the others offer. There is still the trademark mixture of historical fact and fiction, but I missed the camaraderie among the characters. Luke was absent; Danny is evolving into a n I like Cotton Malone; I always look forward to a new volume in this series, but I didn't find this one as appealing as the others. Danny is no longer president, and author Berry tried to keep him in the story with a new role that was prompted by his love interest Stephanie's injury, but the book lacked the oomph that the others offer. There is still the trademark mixture of historical fact and fiction, but I missed the camaraderie among the characters. Luke was absent; Danny is evolving into a new role; Stephanie was a side note, and even Cotton felt flat. I enjoyed the scenes in the Smithsonian and the history lessons surrounding this institution, and I liked learning about the origin of Cotton's name (and ancestors). Plenty of action, this follows the formula of Berry's other books in the series, but it's missing something.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sevag Sarmazian

    I've read all of the Cotton Malone books and enjoyed all of them...except this one. I think the major reason I disliked it so much was all the US government talk. Frankly it bored this non-American. It was also more complex than previous novels and I just didn't want to bother to figure it all out. There was also some inexplicable writing...like Cassiopeia wondering if she should marry Cotton while being shot at by a sniper. Really? The bottom line is this. For most earlier Cotton Malone novels, I've read all of the Cotton Malone books and enjoyed all of them...except this one. I think the major reason I disliked it so much was all the US government talk. Frankly it bored this non-American. It was also more complex than previous novels and I just didn't want to bother to figure it all out. There was also some inexplicable writing...like Cassiopeia wondering if she should marry Cotton while being shot at by a sniper. Really? The bottom line is this. For most earlier Cotton Malone novels, I'd get sad when I was nearing the end. This one ... I couldn't wait for it to end quarter of the way through.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gisela Hausmann

    "The Lost Order: A Novel (Cotton Malone)" suffers from an overload of information. There are just too many plots to make this book really entertaining. The overarching plot could be described as: This is the story of the Knights of the Golden Circle, a dangerous clandestine organization that guards billions in stolen gold and silver, all buried in the Southwest and South of the United States. The money was to be used for a second Civil War. Since that war never happened today everybody who knows "The Lost Order: A Novel (Cotton Malone)" suffers from an overload of information. There are just too many plots to make this book really entertaining. The overarching plot could be described as: This is the story of the Knights of the Golden Circle, a dangerous clandestine organization that guards billions in stolen gold and silver, all buried in the Southwest and South of the United States. The money was to be used for a second Civil War. Since that war never happened today everybody who knows about this is after the Gold. However, author Steve Berry doesn't stop at telling his story about the treasure hunt, he also ventures out in telling that eventually the organization fell apart with some members forming the Ku-Klux clan as well as describing the various types of Knights, who knew what and so on. The second plot is the story of Justice Department agent Cotton Malone, who has connections to the Clan. There is also a subplot of his developing romance with Cassiopeia Vitt, his partner in his search for the gold. Then, there are also the plots/stories of Confederate spy Angus “Cotton” Adams, ex-president Danny Daniels and his new love Stephanie Nelle, the ex-prez's best friend's widow who is planning a radical change to the US's democratic system, and her lover's, the new Speaker of the House's political ambitions, and lastly the Smithsonian Institution, who also wants the Gold. It's an ambitious book project. I listened to the audio edition including the writer's cut, which includes Steve Berry's behind-the-scenes commentary at the ends of some of the chapters. In fact, these commentaries are the reason why I stuck with the book which, at times, seemed to meander. I am a history buff. The sheer volume on riveting information author Steve Barry collected kept me going. For instance, I did not know that in all of the United States only one Speaker of the House had gone on to become US president. I absolutely loved this type of presentation. While I could have done with fewer side plots I would have appreciated even more of Berry's side notes. All in all, an interesting book, certainly a treat for history buffs. 3 1/2 stars, Gisela Hausmann

  13. 4 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    'The Lost Order' was so much fun to read! Read our entire review here: https://booktrib.com/2017/04/steve-be...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I recommend reading Steve Berry to anyone who loves history. and if you want to know How I describe his writing it is a combination of Tom Clancy and Dan Brown (HINT: I like Berry Better than them though) SPOILER: We finally find out how Cotton got his Nickname

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda Reveal

    I picked up this one in the airport after I accidentally checked my real book. Apparently it's one in a series about the same characters. In its favor is historical accuracy about the founding of the Smithsonian and some Civil War intrigue. I found a lot that really interesting. The plot was a bit silly and parboiled but serviceable enough. But the writing was dreadful. "That he did. That she was. That it is. That it would." Ugh. Once in a book maybe but every other chapter? No. Am I recommendin I picked up this one in the airport after I accidentally checked my real book. Apparently it's one in a series about the same characters. In its favor is historical accuracy about the founding of the Smithsonian and some Civil War intrigue. I found a lot that really interesting. The plot was a bit silly and parboiled but serviceable enough. But the writing was dreadful. "That he did. That she was. That it is. That it would." Ugh. Once in a book maybe but every other chapter? No. Am I recommending it? That I'm not.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zohar - ManOfLaBook.com

    The Lost Order by Steve Berry is the 12th novel featuring Cotton Malone. Mr. Berry is not only an author, but also a professor and former attorney. Cotton Malone is asked by the Justice Department to investigate the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history, The Knights of the Golden Circle. The organization is a holdover from the American Civil War and has a cache of gold many are interested in. The Lost Order by Steve Berry is a fast read which brings back the famil The Lost Order by Steve Berry is the 12th novel featuring Cotton Malone. Mr. Berry is not only an author, but also a professor and former attorney. Cotton Malone is asked by the Justice Department to investigate the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history, The Knights of the Golden Circle. The organization is a holdover from the American Civil War and has a cache of gold many are interested in. The Lost Order by Steve Berry is a fast read which brings back the familiar characters of Cotton Malone, Cassiopeia Vitt, Danny Daniels and others. True to the author’s style, the story weaves history, intrigue politics and fiction seamlessly. I enjoyed the way Mr. Berry incorporated the Smithsonian Institute into the story-line. I am privileged to live within a couple of hours of Washington DC and every time I feel privileged to walk into any Smithsonian museum. I loved how the author put that institution front and center as part of the fabric of America. My favorite is the National Air and Space Museum, but I did visit “The Castle” as well. The novel lets the reader know more about Cotton Malone, his ancestor and how he got his nickname. This was a fun book, fast paced and moved the characters forward. For more reviews and bookish posts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com

  17. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    Cotton's help is requested to seek a huge horde of Confederate gold, when the prior person is scared off by one of the guardians. Meanwhile, ex-President Danny Daniels discovers a parallel plot for the Speaker of the House to become as powerful than the President by changing House Rules, relegating the Senate to the minor role it had following independence from Great Britain. I liked the role played by Cotton's grandfather, Danny finagling himself to become a Senator, and learning about the Smit Cotton's help is requested to seek a huge horde of Confederate gold, when the prior person is scared off by one of the guardians. Meanwhile, ex-President Danny Daniels discovers a parallel plot for the Speaker of the House to become as powerful than the President by changing House Rules, relegating the Senate to the minor role it had following independence from Great Britain. I liked the role played by Cotton's grandfather, Danny finagling himself to become a Senator, and learning about the Smithsonian (and founder James Smithson, who $500,000 gift was made without his ever visiting the U.S.) However, the resolutions of the storylines were both protracted and, in one case, a complete fizzle. Kind of an average book for Steve Berry. P.S. I won this book as a Goodreads giveaway, but it did not affect my opinion

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

    Not as good as some of his earlier works - found this jumped around a lot, between characters/scenes, but the history was interesting, as always. Ready for my next trip to the Smithsonian - will look at it with different eyes!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Another winning entry from Steve Berry that fills in the blanks of history with a thrilling contemporary suspense story. In The Lost Order we have Confederate sympathizers and secret societies of the past coupled with a political coup attempt in the present. As usual, it all comes together and the reader is treated to a fast paced thriller and the author supplies a final chapter that separates the historical facts from the fictional conjecture. The first books in the series seemed to set up Cotto Another winning entry from Steve Berry that fills in the blanks of history with a thrilling contemporary suspense story. In The Lost Order we have Confederate sympathizers and secret societies of the past coupled with a political coup attempt in the present. As usual, it all comes together and the reader is treated to a fast paced thriller and the author supplies a final chapter that separates the historical facts from the fictional conjecture. The first books in the series seemed to set up Cotton Malone as a cross between Robert Langdon and Indiana Jones, but we've seen Cotton staying stateside in the U.S. for recent books. As good as these recent entries are, I'm hoping the author has some far-flung global adventures planned in the future.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe Gambill

    You know when you pick up a book, skim the pages, and say to yourself, "Hey i know this book,this place and character". As books go this is #12 in the series and Ive never read a Steve Berry, Cotton Malone adventure, but yet I felt like ive been reading him all along. Its a swift and enthralling book, working on the fringes of historical fact and of course throwing in outlandish action that engaged me to the end. I tend not to me so self inclined and critical of a good action/fiction/thrill and You know when you pick up a book, skim the pages, and say to yourself, "Hey i know this book,this place and character". As books go this is #12 in the series and Ive never read a Steve Berry, Cotton Malone adventure, but yet I felt like ive been reading him all along. Its a swift and enthralling book, working on the fringes of historical fact and of course throwing in outlandish action that engaged me to the end. I tend not to me so self inclined and critical of a good action/fiction/thrill and i will not here. Cotton Malone is a robust character and obviously well established here in #12, so i suggest any reader start at which ever number you choose and expect to be embraced as if , yes youve been there before. Happy reading always.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jill Manske

    Steve Berry has created a fascinating Indiana Jones-like treasure hunt for a billion dollar cache of gold hidden away by the Knights of the Golden Circle, a secret brotherhood with roots in the deep South predating the Civil War. Cotton Malone and Casssiopeia Vitt must decipher clues to find the treasure before current day Knights and a trio of murderous villains with their own plans for the gold. Many of the clues are found at the Smithsonian Institution, and Berry does an excellent job of expl Steve Berry has created a fascinating Indiana Jones-like treasure hunt for a billion dollar cache of gold hidden away by the Knights of the Golden Circle, a secret brotherhood with roots in the deep South predating the Civil War. Cotton Malone and Casssiopeia Vitt must decipher clues to find the treasure before current day Knights and a trio of murderous villains with their own plans for the gold. Many of the clues are found at the Smithsonian Institution, and Berry does an excellent job of explaining the history of the Smithsonian and its holdings. "The Lost Order" is a fast-paced thriller, with Berry's penchant for thorough research into his topic evident throughout. It's very well-written and captured my attention from the first pages. If you want an exciting summer read, this is it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lucile

    I am a huge fan of Steve Berry, especially his Cotton Malone series. I've read all of his books to date as I love the combination of history, a modern day story. and the intrigue. I also appreciate the end notes. Those notes let you distinguish between fact and fiction. You will be surprised at how much fact is present in this fiction book. Most of the books are based on American History, one of my focus areas. I pre-ordered Lost Order and anxiously awaited the delivery on my Kindle. This particu I am a huge fan of Steve Berry, especially his Cotton Malone series. I've read all of his books to date as I love the combination of history, a modern day story. and the intrigue. I also appreciate the end notes. Those notes let you distinguish between fact and fiction. You will be surprised at how much fact is present in this fiction book. Most of the books are based on American History, one of my focus areas. I pre-ordered Lost Order and anxiously awaited the delivery on my Kindle. This particular book is set in the Smithsonian and set during the Civil War as well as modern day Washington D. C. I don't want to give too much away when reviewing a book like this. I do suggest you try at least one Steve Berry book no matter your usual tastes. This book would be a good choice. While the Cotton Malone series progresses chronologically it is possible to read and enjoy the books in any order.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    I love this series of books and this was no exception. This time our character, Cotton Malone gets caught up in a tangled web of buried confederate gold that is being protect by the remaining members of the Knights of the Golden Circle, the history and purpose of the Smithsonian and a covert attempt to change the legislative process of our country. Intrigue, brinkmanship and a treasure hunt await you when you read "The Lost Order"

  24. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    I remember why I stopped this series. I call this US popcorn adventure writing. Its good every now and then for some pure escapism but after a few novels in the series it just becomes the same story/characters with a different history lesson.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Another fast paced, intriguing run through history from Mr. Berry. The Smithsonian history was especially appealing to me. I also loved that this one had more Danny Daniels, and more history on Cotton's family background!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

    If you love historical fiction, you will love Steve Berry's books. This one has the history of the Smithsonian Institute and also current information and loads of other history. Most of the story was based on actual facts and incidents that really happened. I really enjoyed this book. In September I have chosen his book, the Lincoln Myth, for our bookclub to read. I love learning new information and reading a good book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Lillianne

    https://lucy-lillianne.blogspot.com/2...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Martin Hunt

    A very good book 📙 with a good plot and interesting characters, with a historical background to the plot, i really enjoyed the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    You can't help but learn something when reading Steve Berry. Lost Order is one of his best, lots of ups and downs, fast paced, page turning climax. Definitely worth the read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hillis

    A great thriller about the Civil War!

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