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Fragments of Horror; 魔の断片; Ma no Kakera

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A new collection of delightfully macabre tales from a master of horror manga. An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest. Ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome, these stories showcase Junji Ito's long-awaited return to th A new collection of delightfully macabre tales from a master of horror manga. An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest. Ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome, these stories showcase Junji Ito's long-awaited return to the world of horror. Ma no Kakera (魔の断片, also titled Shard of Evil or Fragments of Horror), is a series of short stories by Junji Ito. It began serialization in the first issue of the revived Nemuki+ (ネムキプラス) magazine on April 13, 2013. It was subsequently published as a collection in Japan in June 2014, with the final story, "Whispering Woman", having been previously published in Shinkan (シンカン) rather than Nemuki+. In December 2014, it was licensed by VIZ Media to be released in English in June 2015, under the "Fragments of Horror" title. Chapters: Futon (Blanket) Haunted Wood Mansion Tomio: Red Turtleneck Lingering Farewell Dissection Girl Black Bird Magami Nanakuse Whispering Woman


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A new collection of delightfully macabre tales from a master of horror manga. An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest. Ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome, these stories showcase Junji Ito's long-awaited return to th A new collection of delightfully macabre tales from a master of horror manga. An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest. Ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome, these stories showcase Junji Ito's long-awaited return to the world of horror. Ma no Kakera (魔の断片, also titled Shard of Evil or Fragments of Horror), is a series of short stories by Junji Ito. It began serialization in the first issue of the revived Nemuki+ (ネムキプラス) magazine on April 13, 2013. It was subsequently published as a collection in Japan in June 2014, with the final story, "Whispering Woman", having been previously published in Shinkan (シンカン) rather than Nemuki+. In December 2014, it was licensed by VIZ Media to be released in English in June 2015, under the "Fragments of Horror" title. Chapters: Futon (Blanket) Haunted Wood Mansion Tomio: Red Turtleneck Lingering Farewell Dissection Girl Black Bird Magami Nanakuse Whispering Woman

30 review for Fragments of Horror; 魔の断片; Ma no Kakera

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    Exceptionally gruesome. All these Japanese horror stories are Ju-On ("The Grudge") adjacent! Most of them lack a coherent purpose or strict motive-- which is precisely what makes them all the more eerie and beautiful!! P.S. Ain't the cover a beaut?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    Let me just get this out of the way before we start the review: For my money, at least two of the greatest masters of the weird tale who have ever lived are alive today and working in comics. One is Mike Mignola, and the other is Junji Ito. This is not just Junji Ito’s first horror collection in eight years, but it’s also the only collection of his unrelated horror shorts that’s widely available in print and in the English language right now. That, in itself, is enough to make Fragments of Horro Let me just get this out of the way before we start the review: For my money, at least two of the greatest masters of the weird tale who have ever lived are alive today and working in comics. One is Mike Mignola, and the other is Junji Ito. This is not just Junji Ito’s first horror collection in eight years, but it’s also the only collection of his unrelated horror shorts that’s widely available in print and in the English language right now. That, in itself, is enough to make Fragments of Horror a cause for celebration and the fact that it’s in a gorgeous hardcover edition that looks spectacular on the shelf alongside Viz Media’s other recent Junji Ito releases Uzumaki and Gyo makes it doubly so. Honestly, if you’re a Junji Ito enthusiast, then just knowing that there’s new work out there is probably enough to get you ordering. If you’re not, then it’s probably because you haven’t yet been introduced to his work. While Uzumaki remains his towering masterpiece and an indispensable piece of modern weird fiction, there are much worse places to make your introduction to Ito’s work than in the pages of Fragments of Horror. In his typically self-deprecating author’s note at the end of the book, Ito wonders whether his horror instincts have returned, but it doesn’t take much reading to find out that they have. In fact, Fragments of Horror reads very much like what it is: a return to form. In this volume, you’ll find a cross-section of just about everything you can expect from Ito’s work, from the sublime to the grotesque, and from the serious to the silly. There’s a poignant tale right next door to a ludicrous one. Almost all of them contain Ito’s trademark talent for a perfectly-timed panel, the equivalent of the jump-scare reveal in a movie at just the right moment but all the more impressive because Ito allows it to linger. While Ito has better stories in other books, this is a great collection and an admirable sampling of what makes a Junji Ito story stand out, whether it’s being terrifying or just ridiculous. “Futon,” the first story in the book, is a pretty perfect primer of what you can expect from Junji Ito, all in a compact eight pages, while stories like “Dissection-Chan” and “Blackbird” feel like classic Ito tales. There’s even a touch of his tendency to repeat characters, as the couple from “Futon” show up again in “Tomio – Red Turtleneck.” “Magami Nanakuse,” meanwhile, is a perfect example of one of Ito’s sillier stories. At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter how well Fragments of Horror stacks up next to Junji Ito’s previous horror collections. For those of us who have already been indoctrinated in the cult of Ito, each new story is a treasure. For those who haven’t yet had the pleasure of discovering him, this will serve as a fine introduction. What is important is that the people at Viz Media seem to know the importance of the occasion and have treated Ito’s first collection in almost a decade with the reverence it deserves. The edition is beautiful and sturdy, and just seeing pictures of the cover online cannot possibly do it justice. Once you’ve held it in your hands, you’ll know that this is a special book, one that deserves a special place on your shelf.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    This was RIGHT up my alley .. I couldn't put this down. Junji Ito has a way of telling a story like no one else. These stories were twisted, weird, and had some of the best artwork I've ever seen. Highly recommend!

  4. 5 out of 5

    juan carlos

    DISFRUTA DEL VERDADERO HORROR Y PIERDE LA CABEZA. Las palabras que identifican a este libro es ENFERMIZO Y te dejará INQUIETO TODA LA NOCHE. . Junji Ito volvió a cumplir su objetivo en el horror. ¿Para qué leer Fragmentos de horror? 1. Para conocer historias dementes y enfermizas acompañadas de horror, sadismo, circunstancias un tanto asquerososas. 2. por que cada cuento es original y bien cerrado. 3. Amantes de los seres paranormales, de la muerte irreverente y la oscuridad de la mente humana es DISFRUTA DEL VERDADERO HORROR Y PIERDE LA CABEZA. Las palabras que identifican a este libro es ENFERMIZO Y te dejará INQUIETO TODA LA NOCHE. . Junji Ito volvió a cumplir su objetivo en el horror. ¿Para qué leer Fragmentos de horror? 1. Para conocer historias dementes y enfermizas acompañadas de horror, sadismo, circunstancias un tanto asquerososas. 2. por que cada cuento es original y bien cerrado. 3. Amantes de los seres paranormales, de la muerte irreverente y la oscuridad de la mente humana este es su libro. 4. Si te gustan los temas de: Brujería, la vida después de la muerte, seres mutantes, fantasmas, gustos excéntricos, etc, este texto será el indicado para ti. 5. Cuando lo inicias a leer sabes que te adentras a un mundo de pesadillas que te dejaran con la mente vuelta loca y no podrás pegar el ojo por varias noches por lo intranquilo que te deja cada cuento.

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    From the horror manga-ka author of the masterpiece Uzumaki and Museum of Terror, and after an eight year hiatus, here’s some short stories, some comedic, some scary, some icky, a ghost story, such a range of stuff that he apologizes for in the preface as lame. Not so. I like most of them a lot. I admire how the drawing principally creates the sense of horror, so difficult to imagine accomplishing in a time of blockbuster cgi films. He crafts this fear with clean lines, simple paneling, simple, s From the horror manga-ka author of the masterpiece Uzumaki and Museum of Terror, and after an eight year hiatus, here’s some short stories, some comedic, some scary, some icky, a ghost story, such a range of stuff that he apologizes for in the preface as lame. Not so. I like most of them a lot. I admire how the drawing principally creates the sense of horror, so difficult to imagine accomplishing in a time of blockbuster cgi films. He crafts this fear with clean lines, simple paneling, simple, simple! And fantastic ideas. “Dissection Girl” is creepy. “Black Bird” melds human and animal to create a monster. 'Nanakuse Kyokumi' was my favorite, really inventive and strange. Or maybe "Whispering Woman," a longish atmospheric "ghost" story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emm - The Ordinary Shadow

    Ito's work in general is ridiculously addictive. These drugs are like a comic. Wait. Scratch that. Reverse it. Fragments, the artist himself says, is a little different from his usual as far as the "horrifying" aspect of it, and I truthfully would not call it frightening as a whole, but it's no less elaborate and strange than usual, and "Blackbird" is absolutely haunting. Quirky horror is maybe a good word for Fragments. This collection weaves in-and-out of being either unsettling or humorous, an Ito's work in general is ridiculously addictive. These drugs are like a comic. Wait. Scratch that. Reverse it. Fragments, the artist himself says, is a little different from his usual as far as the "horrifying" aspect of it, and I truthfully would not call it frightening as a whole, but it's no less elaborate and strange than usual, and "Blackbird" is absolutely haunting. Quirky horror is maybe a good word for Fragments. This collection weaves in-and-out of being either unsettling or humorous, and there is not a single poor story in this beauty. Here's the rundown: Futon - 3/5 A really short story about a man who confines himself to a futon after he starts to have hallucinations of nature demons. There's a beautiful panorama drawing of these demons, which is the main focal point of the story. Wooden Spirit - 4/5 A strange woman worms her way into a house that has recently been named a historical site, much to the misfortune of the family who owns it. She is passionately in love with the house, and the house returns her feelings. A deeper romance than most romance books, really. Tomio - Red Turtleneck - 3.5/5 A witch who collects severed heads curses a boy so that he has to hold his skull in place forever, lest he be decapitated. This one was interesting, but to me, one of the weaker stories. It gets a bit too absurd by the end, what with the cockroaches and head games (ha ha), and feels more like a comedy than anything. Gentle Goodbye - 4/5 A family wills its deceased members back to life as "ghosts" for awhile to give them time to accept their passing. A melancholy, poignant spin on a haunted-house story. More like a haunted world. Dissection-chan - 5/5 An ero-guro short, unusual for Ito but very welcome. I love this one, it is so... remarkably weirder than most stories I have read. An unstable girl has a deep-seated, unhealthy obsession with dissection, and she gets to be something of a demented urban legend because of it after she begins to harass a medical student that was once her childhood friend. Dark and offbeat. Blackbird - 5/5 The previous story was pretty grotesque, but I think "Blackbird" outmatches it. A man breaks his leg while hiking in the woods, and an enigmatic, vaguely-human woman in black saves him from starving to death by feeding him strange meat. The problem is, after he is rescued and brought to a hospital, she still thinks he is starving, and keeps coming back to feed him. In my opinion, this is the apex story, and by far the creepiest. I would actually go so far as to say it's one of the artist's best, period. Mind-paralyzingly creepy. Magami Nanakuse - 5/5 Surreal comedy at its finest. An eccentric author has an over-the-top obsession with tics and quirky characters, so much that he keeps his particularly quirky fans in a dungeon so that he can readily study their tics and use them as characters in his novel. A welcome laugh after the bleakness of "Blackbird". Whispering Woman - 4/5 The last story wavers on the border between creepy and depressing. A girl has an unusual mental disorder that causes her to question literally every movement she makes, so her father hires a caretaker to help guide her. The caretaker's health seems to rapidly fail, and soon she seems very unnerving and ghostly, but her devotion to the girl never fails... Overall: Art - 6/5 Story - 4/5 Originality - 5/5 General Score - 5/5 Content - Might recommend 15+ for gore and disturbing content.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    ‘Fragmentos del mal’, de Junji Ito, es una recopilación de historias cortas de terror, que es donde parece que más brilla el autor. El dibujo es muy bueno, y las ideas de Ito son imaginativas, a la par que perturbadoras. Estos son los ocho relatos incluidos: Futón. (****) Una chica que encuentra a su novio bajo el futón, sin querer salir, por los monstruos que dice ver. Espectros de madera. (***) Los dueños de una casa antigua, un padre y una hija, deciden permitir las visitas de los posibles inte ‘Fragmentos del mal’, de Junji Ito, es una recopilación de historias cortas de terror, que es donde parece que más brilla el autor. El dibujo es muy bueno, y las ideas de Ito son imaginativas, a la par que perturbadoras. Estos son los ocho relatos incluidos: Futón. (****) Una chica que encuentra a su novio bajo el futón, sin querer salir, por los monstruos que dice ver. Espectros de madera. (***) Los dueños de una casa antigua, un padre y una hija, deciden permitir las visitas de los posibles interesados en dicho patrimonio. Al poco aparece una mujer que no solo desea ver la casa, sino que también quiere vivir un tiempo en ella. Tomio y el jersey rojo de cuello alto. (*****) La historia empieza con un chico que no separa las manos de su cabeza. Excelente, de esos relatos que no puedes olvidar. Una separación lenta. (*****) Es una historia de fantasmas en la que no hay terror, pero es un cuento que me ha encantado. Miss Disección. (****) Relato sobre una mujer obsesionada con las disecciones. Extraño y macabro. El ave negra. (****) Un alpinista es encontrado tras una accidente. Al poco sabremos cómo logró sobrevivir tantos días. Original y perturbador. Magami Nanakuse. (**) Historia sobre una escritora que escribe sobre las manías. Flojo. La mujer que susurra. (***) Una chica es incapaz de tomar la más mínima decisión por sí misma, por lo que su padre contrata a una asistenta que la atienda constantemente.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Though not as good as Uzumaki or Gyo, Fragments of Horror still packs a punch for those who seek legitimate horror manga. This is not Junji Ito's best, yet the short stories in this book are still more than enough to haunt you in your nightmares. Fragments of Horror, like all of Junji Ito's works carries that trademark theme of extreme obsession that leads to horrific imagery and very often the tragic demise of the characters. The psychological wtf-ness creeps into your mind as Junji Ito progress Though not as good as Uzumaki or Gyo, Fragments of Horror still packs a punch for those who seek legitimate horror manga. This is not Junji Ito's best, yet the short stories in this book are still more than enough to haunt you in your nightmares. Fragments of Horror, like all of Junji Ito's works carries that trademark theme of extreme obsession that leads to horrific imagery and very often the tragic demise of the characters. The psychological wtf-ness creeps into your mind as Junji Ito progresses his panels from the mundane to the totally dark and crazily bizarre. The stories in this volume are a hit or miss for me. Some stories end in casual, and sometimes surprisingly heartfelt conclusions while still most stories end with the usual psycho-horror tropes. I find the Red Turtleneck the most horrifying among all the stories, followed by Blackbird. Nonetheless, Ito fans like myself will still rejoice reading this collected edition (which is bounded in a beautifully designed hardcover with an awesome jacket). Fragments of Horror is a must-buy for those who collect horror manga.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ray Nadine

    I've always been a fan of Junji Ito's horror, and this book started off so strong, but the second to last story left such a bad taste in my mouth that it spoiled the book for me. I do love how short the stories are, and even though they are short, they still managed to get across a subtle level of disturbing that creeps in your head for a while, even after finishing the story. It was really hard to put the book down and was easy to jump into the small world built around each story. The story in q I've always been a fan of Junji Ito's horror, and this book started off so strong, but the second to last story left such a bad taste in my mouth that it spoiled the book for me. I do love how short the stories are, and even though they are short, they still managed to get across a subtle level of disturbing that creeps in your head for a while, even after finishing the story. It was really hard to put the book down and was easy to jump into the small world built around each story. The story in question that really bothered me involved (view spoiler)[portraying a transgender woman as the villain of the story, and had a distasteful "a-ha! She's actually a man oh my god!" reveal that was incredibly tacky and uncalled for. (hide spoiler)] It had nothing to do with the actual horror aspect of the story, and it only went on to propagate incorrect stereotypes about a marginalized group of people. When tropes like that are played into, I feel like it's cheap and poor storytelling.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hernandez

    I loved Tomio-Red Sweater, Gentle Good Goodbye, Dissection-chan and Blackbird. The rest were ok. I really liked the effort and originality Junji Ito puts forth into his novels... I will continue to support his work and be one of his biggest fans!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Baal Of

    I had given up on ever reading any new Junji Ito, but after a very long wait, here is a new collection of stories. Ito is a master of weird horror, and my absolute favorite horror manga writer. This volume is not quite as good as some of his other work, but I'm still giving it 5 stars because I love it. Ito's ideas are bizarre, and even when the story seems to be going in a mundane direction, he always manages to turn it into something twisted by the end. His artwork style fits the writing, with I had given up on ever reading any new Junji Ito, but after a very long wait, here is a new collection of stories. Ito is a master of weird horror, and my absolute favorite horror manga writer. This volume is not quite as good as some of his other work, but I'm still giving it 5 stars because I love it. Ito's ideas are bizarre, and even when the story seems to be going in a mundane direction, he always manages to turn it into something twisted by the end. His artwork style fits the writing, with relatively clean lines, and simple paneling, which serves to put focus on the story. It's hard for me to pick a favorite, but a few of the standouts are 'Dissection Girl' with a character that starts off with a fascination for cutting up animals, but eventually wants the scalpel turned on herself. 'Black Bird' was also great, with a classic Junji Ito melding of human with animal, creating a unique creature that is horrific, and yet makes sense in disgusting sort of way. 'Nanakuse Kyokumi' was just plain fucking weird, and I wonder how he even came up with the concept. I think I need to go back and read all the other Junji Ito books I've got.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    Another good collection of Jungi Ito horror stories. Slightly better than the newer Shiver collection.

  13. 4 out of 5

    rob

    Longer waits breed high expectations. Its been eight years since Ito did horror manga and even longer since the West got a title of his in English. This collection came out last year in Japan and gives eight stories varying from ghost stories to gore/exploitation. Its nowhere near the neurotic intensity of Gyo and especially not near his masterpiece, Uzumaki, but more along the lines of the stories presented in Vol. 3 of Museum of Terror. Many of the stories kind of build up to one big reveal, s Longer waits breed high expectations. Its been eight years since Ito did horror manga and even longer since the West got a title of his in English. This collection came out last year in Japan and gives eight stories varying from ghost stories to gore/exploitation. Its nowhere near the neurotic intensity of Gyo and especially not near his masterpiece, Uzumaki, but more along the lines of the stories presented in Vol. 3 of Museum of Terror. Many of the stories kind of build up to one big reveal, shown to us in a full-page drawing (or sometimes double page) of some specific horror. "Futon," "Wooden Spirit" and especially "Dissection-chan" have really good centerfolds. The latter story, maybe the worst of the collection, rides the line too close to past Tomie works and comes off dull. "Blackbird" has the most surreal atmosphere of the collection, dealing with birds and the cyclical dread of time-bending storytelling, leading up to a conclusion that seems outwardly frightening and mystified enough in being satisfied with its non-ending. "Megumi Nanakuse" and "Tomio - Red Turtleneck" have the most Ito-ish elements of the group (Ito himself admitting in the afterward his work with cat manga kind of dulled his Id a bit), giving the readers endings that are disposably horrific and critically post-modern in their resolution to let fear of the known carry over into what we would see as the "unknown" ie what goes past the final page; maybe its almost pre-modern (there is no binary, just fear). "Tomio..." is my favorite story and closely tied to a certain delirious Umezu comic I cannot think of the title of right now. Equally suspenseful and gory it ends with a panel that almost made me laugh. I was mildly disappointed with this collection but I'm so eager for more. Itosan, don't make us wait, dawg.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Chung

    This is the second manga from this author that I have read and have the same feelings as the first one. It was sooooo weird! Not scary in the slightest, but definitely creepy. Some stories were sillier then others. I feel like this would be the Japanese equivalent of 'Scary Stories' by Alvin Schwartz. This book is a collection of short stories. Some longer than others. My favorite stories were, "Gentle Goodbye", "Dissection-chan" and "Whispering Woman". Since these were the ones I enjoyed the mo This is the second manga from this author that I have read and have the same feelings as the first one. It was sooooo weird! Not scary in the slightest, but definitely creepy. Some stories were sillier then others. I feel like this would be the Japanese equivalent of 'Scary Stories' by Alvin Schwartz. This book is a collection of short stories. Some longer than others. My favorite stories were, "Gentle Goodbye", "Dissection-chan" and "Whispering Woman". Since these were the ones I enjoyed the most and the longest stories in the book I'll review these ones. "Gentle Goodbye" is about a family tradition of praying hard enough for a dead relative to become an "after-image". Meaning they aren't ghosts, but a image of their former selves except they will eventually disappear, but this gives the family more years to grieve and let go of their loved one through going about their days with the loved one still "mostly" there. I did not expect that ending :D "Dissection-Chan" was just gross. It's about a girl who was fascinated about dissecting frogs and mice when she was little. Soon rodents and amphibians weren't enough for her and she wanted to dissect bigger game. Super creepy! The last story I really liked was "Whispering Woman". This short story is about a woman who wants a job she saw in the want ads. The job is to literally tell a girl what to do 12 hours a day. From sitting to standing to breathing to eating. The girl is so anxious to do anything with out consulting someone first that she panics. The hired woman finds helping the girl peaceful in some way and does a wonderful job at it. Of course the story is creepier then that, but I don't want to spoil it :D Over all if you like paranormal, strange Japanese tales definitely pick up this manga. Junji Ito always has awesome illustrations in his books and they are guaranteed to be super weird.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leo Robertson

    Juan and I read this together at night and then we both had nightmares. 10/10 We also tried watching one of those Insidious films recently and it's all skittering about ghosts/shrieking noise and we were both like lol wtf is this, absolutely not.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Niyura

    Espeluznante e impresionante!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cintia Andrade

    Essas histórias são macabras, assustadoras, eróticas, engraçadas, peculiares, e acima de tudo, MUITO esquisitas. Gostei de tudo e a arte é divina.

  18. 4 out of 5

    C. Varn

    Junji Ito's short form horror is top-notch and after a eight year hiatus, it is too to see Junji Ito working on horror again. While they are "Weird Stories," they don't bare the hallmarks of so much of the genre. His art is clean, detailed, and the contrast between the clean line work and the grotesque is often hyper-effective. These work more like "Tales from the Dark Side" or the "Twilight" zone with weirder twists. Magami Nanakuse' is a dark morality tale, and 'Gentle Goodbye' is melancholy, Junji Ito's short form horror is top-notch and after a eight year hiatus, it is too to see Junji Ito working on horror again. While they are "Weird Stories," they don't bare the hallmarks of so much of the genre. His art is clean, detailed, and the contrast between the clean line work and the grotesque is often hyper-effective. These work more like "Tales from the Dark Side" or the "Twilight" zone with weirder twists. Magami Nanakuse' is a dark morality tale, and 'Gentle Goodbye' is melancholy, distant, and slightly sad. 'Futon' is simply strange as is "Wooden Spirit" and yet somehow they work. "Dissection-chan" and "Blackbird" are truly horrific, and "Tomio-Red Turtleneck" feels like classic Junji Ito in it's surreal, violent, and slightly unsatisfying ending.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marcelo Galvão

    Do mesmo autor de "Tomie" e "Uzumaki", esta coletânea reúne oito histórias de horror (cada uma tem em média 30 páginas, com exceção da primeira). A arte de Junji Ito é espetacular, transmitindo bem a apreensão e o terror, mesmo que às vezes pareça exagerada. Quanto ao roteiro, na maioria da histórias tive a impressão que o autor não sabia o final (ou teve preguiça de descobri-lo), precisando então inventar um desfecho bizarro que nem sempre combinou com o que ele estipulou antes no início e meio Do mesmo autor de "Tomie" e "Uzumaki", esta coletânea reúne oito histórias de horror (cada uma tem em média 30 páginas, com exceção da primeira). A arte de Junji Ito é espetacular, transmitindo bem a apreensão e o terror, mesmo que às vezes pareça exagerada. Quanto ao roteiro, na maioria da histórias tive a impressão que o autor não sabia o final (ou teve preguiça de descobri-lo), precisando então inventar um desfecho bizarro que nem sempre combinou com o que ele estipulou antes no início e meio da trama. Os pontos altos do livro ficam por conta de "Gentle Goodbye" e "Whispering Woman", enquanto que "Magami Nanakuse" é uma total perda de tempo.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yume

    Otro tomo que me ha gustado muchísimo, incluso más que el anterior. Algunas historias no son tan "terroríficas", pero están muy bien para mi punto de vista. Posiblemente sea uno de mis tomos favoritos de este autor.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chandré Louw

    3.5 Stars Expected a lot more from this one. Albeit the stories were unique and and the art incredible , it lacked the horror I was anticipating. Chilling and creative but not really horrifying.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Danger

    More of the same gross, gory, nightmare-fueled stories and demented art I’ve now come to expect from Ito. While some of the shorts were better than others, it was still a strong collection. Varied in tone, but 100% pure horror. Very good.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Octavi

    Maravillosamente enfermizo. Este japo está fatal, y por ello lo adoro.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cherch

    La primera colección de relatos de horror de Junji Ito en ocho años es, por decir lo menos, altamente irregular. La gran mayoría de las historias se sienten apresuradas, cerrándose muchas de ellas con torpeza en apenas un par de viñetas, o simplemente mostrándose incapaces de llevar a buen término ideas que en un principio podrían parecer interesantes. 3 relatos interesantes: 1. TOMIO. Red turtleneck: un hombre se folla a una bruja que le cercena la cabeza con un hilo. El hombre debe mantener la ca La primera colección de relatos de horror de Junji Ito en ocho años es, por decir lo menos, altamente irregular. La gran mayoría de las historias se sienten apresuradas, cerrándose muchas de ellas con torpeza en apenas un par de viñetas, o simplemente mostrándose incapaces de llevar a buen término ideas que en un principio podrían parecer interesantes. 3 relatos interesantes: 1. TOMIO. Red turtleneck: un hombre se folla a una bruja que le cercena la cabeza con un hilo. El hombre debe mantener la cabeza pegada a su cuerpo para no morir. El manejo de la situación inverosímil y grotesca del cuento es extraordinario, pero la resolución es pobre. 2. Blackbird: cuento seguramente derivado de algún tipo de mitología japonesa en la que un espíritu con forma de pájaro alimenta a un hombre moribundo en el bosque. El hombre se salva y resulta que el pájaro alimentaba al hombre con su propia carne, valiéndose de un salto temporal. Es tal vez el cuento más "redondo" de la compilación. 3. Whispering woman: una mujer cuida a otra que no puede decidir nada por sí misma, dictándole instrucciones meticulosas sobre lo que debe hacer todo el tiempo. La cuidadora vive con un abusador que la asesina. Al final la mujer cuidada sigue escuchando a la muerta que le ordena que asesine a su pareja abusiva y así lo hace. El tratamiento es brillante pero la resolución, apresurada y torpe, le resta mucho valor al relato. El resto son relatos intrascendentes que van desde el erotismo por casas viejas, hasta el fetichismo por autodiseccionarse.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    In the author's note, he states that the first story in this collection was his first return to horror after an 8-year hiatus and he feels it is a weak entry for him. I'm presuming the stories are published in order of publication as they gradually become better with the best stories being the ones toward the end. Even if all the stories aren't fantastic Ito is an awesome horror illustrator and he certainly knows how to give you the creeps with his detailed freaky illustrations. There were only In the author's note, he states that the first story in this collection was his first return to horror after an 8-year hiatus and he feels it is a weak entry for him. I'm presuming the stories are published in order of publication as they gradually become better with the best stories being the ones toward the end. Even if all the stories aren't fantastic Ito is an awesome horror illustrator and he certainly knows how to give you the creeps with his detailed freaky illustrations. There were only a couple I thought were sub par storywise. The rest were truly eerie tales that left me feeling slightly disturbed afterward. My favourite story though wasn't really horror but more of a ghost story called "Gentle Goodbye" which is probably the longest story in the book and is placed in the middle of the book. It was very atmospheric and quite touching. A good book to dip into a bit at a time to fully appreciate the stories and disturbing illustrations.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charles Dee Mitchell

    I admire Junji Ito's horror tales for their exuberance. His draughtsmanship places the stories in a precisely rendered contemporary Japan, but before they are over you can be sure that all hell will break loose. They are often a bit nutty, but the horror is visceral and the experiences of his protagonists are devastating. Two standouts from this collection: A young woman's passion for the preservation of traditional Japanese architecture proves to literally know no bounds. In another, the meanin I admire Junji Ito's horror tales for their exuberance. His draughtsmanship places the stories in a precisely rendered contemporary Japan, but before they are over you can be sure that all hell will break loose. They are often a bit nutty, but the horror is visceral and the experiences of his protagonists are devastating. Two standouts from this collection: A young woman's passion for the preservation of traditional Japanese architecture proves to literally know no bounds. In another, the meaning of "gross anatomy" takes on new meaning.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    If you love manga, and if you love horror, you can't go wrong with Junji Ito. This more recent collection of short horror tales is typical of Ito's style and brand. In fact, you could also argue that the "typical" nature of some of these stories might be the book's potential shortcoming. There were one or two times reading through this collection that I wondered if Ito is just playing too much on his formula and our expectations of him. Still, this is fun and creepy and weird book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

    Not my favorite work from Junji Ito but still good. 😊 Review soon on my website 👉 www.nomuhjournal.com

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ken Yuen

    Wonderful! What an imaginative set of stories.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Asphodel Parker

    I have discovered only recently the art of Junji Ito, and even though I was freaked out by his strange creations, I found them just as mesmerising. The stories and the art work are gruesomely fascinating, and I have found myself trapped in this hole that is horror manga. As much of a scaredy cat as I am (refusing to watch any kind of horror movies whatsoever), I am completely fascinated by his horrendous masterpieces, also questioning the ability of a mere human being to own such a rich imaginat I have discovered only recently the art of Junji Ito, and even though I was freaked out by his strange creations, I found them just as mesmerising. The stories and the art work are gruesomely fascinating, and I have found myself trapped in this hole that is horror manga. As much of a scaredy cat as I am (refusing to watch any kind of horror movies whatsoever), I am completely fascinated by his horrendous masterpieces, also questioning the ability of a mere human being to own such a rich imagination. The only thing that I find slightly annoying is the fact that there is no explanation behind any of his stories. Most of them end up in this kind of cliffhanger that lets you wonder, and it is so frustrating! Some stories are so weird that I really need the explanation behind them, but there is not any! Like The Enigma of Amigara Fault . I want to know the scientifical explanation behind that one! Now, moving on onto the particular stories that are in this book: Futon A very short story compared to the others, but just as creepy. A young man finds safety under his futon after he starts seeing strange things in his own house. The fear gets worse with each day passing by until it starts impedimenting his life, forcing his girlfriend to care for him as if he were a child. The story ends, surprisingly, in a happy tone and no deaths for any of the characters. Wooden Spirit If you haven't learned to keep strangers outside your house, then this story will sure teach you to keep the door locked. Who would have thought that someone was so attracted to architecture that they would literally start making out with the house? Fall in love with your passion and you might merge together into a monstrosity. Next time you bring a lover home, make sure they are in love with you, and not the house. Tomio – Red Turtleneck By far my favourite story in this volume. It's not the creepiest, but it sure caught my attention. It also teaches you about the consequences of infidelity; cheat once and you might lose your head – literally. The most fascinating thing about it was how a plain white turtleneck sweater ended up soaked in so much blood that it turned red, hence the title. And just as surprisingly, this story also ended on a lighter note. Thank god, I don't think I would have had my head on my shoulders if it ended in another manner (I should stop with the puns already). Gentle Goodbye A story about a girl who is not accepted by the relatives of her husband, and her discoveries as she wanders into the new house she is living in. She is met with an odd ritual at the funeral of her husband's grandfather, and she soon realises that not everything she sees is real, but just a mere image kept for consolation. She gets so caught up on the idea of preserving her father's spirit after his death that she does not realise that she herself is a mere shard of solace, a lingering farewell, and she does not have much time until her own light starts to shimmer, and until she bids her last, gentle goodbye. Dissection Girl The second creepiest story in this volume, Dissection Girl shows the weird nature of a girl that craves to be dissected alive. Apparently, this desire of hers runs back into her childhood, when she herself performed dissections on different animals to satisfy her morbid thirst. It seems that throughout the years, the intention to cut up live beings didn't fade away, but morphed into the wish of having her own body carved open with a scalpel by the most skilled doctors. Little did the students of the Medical University know that what was hiding inside her dead body was more than horrenduos. Black Bird The creepiest story in this volume. Kids, don't go hiking. You might break your leg, and well... the rest is history. You think momma-birds feeding their little nestlings orally is cute? Well, you'd want to make sure they don't end up eating human flesh. Basically, a man is found in the forest after a month since his disappearance, and he has surprisingly survived. Little did we know that he was actually orally fed daily by a strange lady, that gave him raw flesh and blood. After he was rescued, she kept feeding him until the police started investigating. Years after the man returned to his hometown, he was found dead on Mount Fuji, eaten by a black bird. He was a match for the DNA test run on the flesh that he ate back when he was in the hospital. Man, aren't time jumps tiring? Nanakuse Kyokumi A strange story about a girl so obsessed with her favourite author that she decides to respond to Nanakuse's invitation of coming to her house, located in an eerie place, to develop her own writing skills. The disappointment begins when the author welcomes the young woman with a bag full of insults, and is then replaced by the invitation of having a drink in Kyokumi's strange cellar where she keeps all her beverages. After our protagonist drinks so much that she passes out, she wakes up behind the bars, locked in a dungeon with other strange phenomenons of live beings. Nanakuse explains that each of them has a certain quirk, and that the main character too, will develop one after a good time spent in the abysmal darkness and the piercing quiteness of the dungeon. After all, a good writer needs a good source of inspiration, right?

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