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Rose Madder (Compass Press)

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Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here Roused by a single drop of blood, Rosie Daniels wakes up to the chilling realisation that her husband is going to kill her. And she takes flight - with his credit card. Alone in a strange city, Rosie begins to build a new life: she meets Bill Steiner and she finds an odd junk shop painting, 'Rose Madder', which strangely seems Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here Roused by a single drop of blood, Rosie Daniels wakes up to the chilling realisation that her husband is going to kill her. And she takes flight - with his credit card. Alone in a strange city, Rosie begins to build a new life: she meets Bill Steiner and she finds an odd junk shop painting, 'Rose Madder', which strangely seems to want her as much as she wants it. But it's hard for Rosie not to keep looking over her shoulder. Rose-maddened and on the rampage, Norman is a corrupt cop with a dog's instinct for tracking people. And he's getting close. Rosie can feel just how close he's getting...


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Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here Roused by a single drop of blood, Rosie Daniels wakes up to the chilling realisation that her husband is going to kill her. And she takes flight - with his credit card. Alone in a strange city, Rosie begins to build a new life: she meets Bill Steiner and she finds an odd junk shop painting, 'Rose Madder', which strangely seems Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here Roused by a single drop of blood, Rosie Daniels wakes up to the chilling realisation that her husband is going to kill her. And she takes flight - with his credit card. Alone in a strange city, Rosie begins to build a new life: she meets Bill Steiner and she finds an odd junk shop painting, 'Rose Madder', which strangely seems to want her as much as she wants it. But it's hard for Rosie not to keep looking over her shoulder. Rose-maddened and on the rampage, Norman is a corrupt cop with a dog's instinct for tracking people. And he's getting close. Rosie can feel just how close he's getting...

30 review for Rose Madder (Compass Press)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Hoover

    My book club read this book last month. This is how book club went basically: Joy: Colleen, what was your favorite part of this book? Me: Well, Joy, I'll get to that in a few, but would anyone like some chocolate? (Passes around a bowl of chocolate until they are all staring at me expectantly. Reluctantly continues.) You know, Joy, Stephen King never disappoints. Every time I turned the page, there were more words that formed sentences. The kind of sentences that make up all of Stephen King's boo My book club read this book last month. This is how book club went basically: Joy: Colleen, what was your favorite part of this book? Me: Well, Joy, I'll get to that in a few, but would anyone like some chocolate? (Passes around a bowl of chocolate until they are all staring at me expectantly. Reluctantly continues.) You know, Joy, Stephen King never disappoints. Every time I turned the page, there were more words that formed sentences. The kind of sentences that make up all of Stephen King's books. Long ones, short ones, incomplete ones. But that's the beauty of this book, right? The sentences tell a story in a way that only sentences could. And THAT is why this book was so brilliant. Joy: You're a f*cking idiot. Why are you even in book club if you never actually read the books? Me: Five stars!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    3.5 Stars If you can handle a story of horrific abuse, Hannibal Lector's idea of a tasty dinner, and haunted dreams from the beyond, you're going to love ROSE MADDER. Norman "Bates" Daniels is a lunatic cop with a foul mouth and a sick, evil mind, and for wife Rose, a life of fear and pain begins the night of her honeymoon.......for the reader, it's almost immediate and a real shocker. Unprepared, terrified and alone, after 14 long years of living in hell, Rose finally flees for her life knowing 3.5 Stars If you can handle a story of horrific abuse, Hannibal Lector's idea of a tasty dinner, and haunted dreams from the beyond, you're going to love ROSE MADDER. Norman "Bates" Daniels is a lunatic cop with a foul mouth and a sick, evil mind, and for wife Rose, a life of fear and pain begins the night of her honeymoon.......for the reader, it's almost immediate and a real shocker. Unprepared, terrified and alone, after 14 long years of living in hell, Rose finally flees for her life knowing full well he will never stop searching. ROSE MADDER is an intense thriller throughout most of the 600+ pages, but for me lost its momentum when we entered the mysterious, but drawn out world of the supernatural, and the ending.....just ok. As always, enjoyed the tie-ins to other KING novels.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    "It ain't the blows we're dealt that matter, but the ones we survive." A single drop of blood causes Rose McClendon to come to the realisation that her husband might actually kill her. So she ups and leaves him, setting off to a new city... I always get really excited for the King novels where the main protagonist is a female as I've a pretty good track record with them - Lisey's Story, Dolores Claiborne, Gerald's Game etc. I'm pretty sure these were all 5 star reads for me! So I had high expectat "It ain't the blows we're dealt that matter, but the ones we survive." A single drop of blood causes Rose McClendon to come to the realisation that her husband might actually kill her. So she ups and leaves him, setting off to a new city... I always get really excited for the King novels where the main protagonist is a female as I've a pretty good track record with them - Lisey's Story, Dolores Claiborne, Gerald's Game etc. I'm pretty sure these were all 5 star reads for me! So I had high expectations for Rose Madder, but unfortunately we just didn't click *sad face* My main complaint is the character of Norman, Rose's husband. He's a piece of shit - that much is apparent from the very first page - but as the story progressed, his character became more of a caricature for me? It all became very over the top and exaggerated. I didn't need all the biting... It was enough for me to know that he was an abusive husband - I already hated him, but King kept building on it in a way that I didn't care for. And if Norman had mentioned his ATM card one more time... I think I might have EXPLODED. After a while repetition can become very irritating. Norman is also not a typical King villain. Often King's characters are quite complex, they exist in shades of grey, people aren't always just good or evil. But Norman has ZERO redeeming features - he's racist, homophobic, batters his wife, squeezes people's intestines until they burst. It was very uncomfortable to read the story from his perspective. I also HATED that all the sections from Norman's point of view were in italics. PAGES OF IT. Reading italics for so long hurts my eyes and I can't concentrate - it actually stopped me from picking up the book at times or I would get very easily distracted by my phone instead. I would like to think we're all smart enough to quickly pick up on who's part of the story we're reading without needing it to be made obvious for us. Now, what I DID like - Rosie! She's the kickass female I want to root for! Her relationship with Bill was truly beautiful and I felt very protective over those guys. They are definitely one of King's strongest couples, they were very well-written and believable. I also loved the usual King easter eggs with references to Misery and the Dark Tower series in particular. So bonus points for that! The plot does go down quite a weird route, and initially I felt a bit unimpressed and bored reading it, but over time began to appreciate it more for what it was? I just feel like the book would have worked better if it had stayed focus on the domestic violence aspect, and Rose escaping from her abusive marriage, the events involving the painting just felt a tad stupid at times and over-written. It's just not a new favourite for me unfortunately, but I can champion Rose as another awesome leading lady. And I did enjoy quite large sections of it! 3.5 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Probably my favorite King book, Rose Madder contains some of his creepiest imagery and the best characterization of a woman that he's managed thus far. It's hard not to get involved in Rosie's problems as she runs from a horrifically abusive marriage. The supernatural horror aspect of the story doesn't even enter into it until fairly late in the book; King gives you the chance to watch Rosie grow and change, and to set the stage for what will happen next. Definitely the one I would loan to someon Probably my favorite King book, Rose Madder contains some of his creepiest imagery and the best characterization of a woman that he's managed thus far. It's hard not to get involved in Rosie's problems as she runs from a horrifically abusive marriage. The supernatural horror aspect of the story doesn't even enter into it until fairly late in the book; King gives you the chance to watch Rosie grow and change, and to set the stage for what will happen next. Definitely the one I would loan to someone who wasn't sure about King's more horrifying books, but wanted to try out his writing anyway.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    “The concept of dreaming is known to the waking mind but to the dreamer there is no waking, no real world, no sanity; there is only the screaming bedlam of sleep.” Stephen King can be downright weird with surprises he leaves for the reader. For the bulk of the book, it's an interesting story of an abused woman escaping her sadistic and tormenting husband. The main character is a sympathetic lead who doesn't indulge in melodrama or denial, but comes across realistically written when she escapes in “The concept of dreaming is known to the waking mind but to the dreamer there is no waking, no real world, no sanity; there is only the screaming bedlam of sleep.” Stephen King can be downright weird with surprises he leaves for the reader. For the bulk of the book, it's an interesting story of an abused woman escaping her sadistic and tormenting husband. The main character is a sympathetic lead who doesn't indulge in melodrama or denial, but comes across realistically written when she escapes into a town and group that accepts her for who she is and not what she's escaping. The side characters were as well-written, including the lead of the women's group who, while being noble, isn't black and white noble. Rose Madder was a tough book to put down and I didn't get the griping I'd heard about it....until, well until it just gets weird. The painting and other world stuff threw me. I had a discussion with a friend about this and we both felt the story didn't need any of it. He could have just written a thriller with a man chasing his escaped wife and it would have been great; when he introduces the fantasy stuff that was hard to comprehend, the story loses focus and even warrants a little skimming. Unlike some of King's other tomes, the length and pacing are suitable to the story content. The ending has a weird and bitter twist which fit well, even again that I didn't full get it. The author doesn't shy away from actual vicious abuse, giving his main villain a biting tendency. I would have liked to see more of the details of the shelter, but I liked the women who worked together and had friendships. It was convincing and thoughtful.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    I just met crazy rivaling that of Annie Wilkes. Norman Daniels. He’s a special kind of nut. Turns out this book was better than I had anticipated. Maybe that’s due to low expectations, seeing that many put this one towards the bottom of their personal King ratings. Introducing a preternatural painting within a story about spousal abuse is “out there”, maybe more so than his other books. But isn’t that what King does so well? The painting did not necessarily overwhelm the narrative. It added a dim I just met crazy rivaling that of Annie Wilkes. Norman Daniels. He’s a special kind of nut. Turns out this book was better than I had anticipated. Maybe that’s due to low expectations, seeing that many put this one towards the bottom of their personal King ratings. Introducing a preternatural painting within a story about spousal abuse is “out there”, maybe more so than his other books. But isn’t that what King does so well? The painting did not necessarily overwhelm the narrative. It added a dimension. Some have said this book would have been better as a straight-out thriller, with the supernatural element removed. Guess what? That’s been done - a million times over. There’s a bull parallel with Norman that comes to fruition towards the end. When you see it, it’s an obvious analogy, but smart (you’ll need to have read the book to understand), and it caught me off guard. By doing this King brings the story full circle, using that wacky and wonderful imagination no less. Granted, this book is not for everyone. Even some King fans will cringe at the violence and sexual innuendos (many of which are not innuendos at all). And I don’t know if it was just me, but I was rolling on the floor when Norman got hurt. Norman falls down the stairs. I laughed. Couldn’t help it. I attribute it to King’s use of slapstick amid terror, along with a display of alternating viewpoints (first experienced from Rosie’s point of view, then Norman’s). Plus, Norman’s an ass, deserving of any pain that happened to come his way. Recommend for King fans because none should be missed. A “probably not” for 1st time King readers. PS. There’s a tiny glimpse into the world of The Dark Tower. It doesn’t say much, just kind of fun to run into.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    Now I remember why I didn't like this the first time I read it. It wears out its welcome a good 60 pages before the end. We get our denouement, and then we're made to wade through a goodly chunk of book before we can call it done. Still, Rose Madder is okay. I think what keeps this book pretty middle of the road for me is Norman Daniels, our cliched villain. King has three types of male antagonists: women beaters, child molesters, and racists. Norman Daniels suffers from the former and the latte Now I remember why I didn't like this the first time I read it. It wears out its welcome a good 60 pages before the end. We get our denouement, and then we're made to wade through a goodly chunk of book before we can call it done. Still, Rose Madder is okay. I think what keeps this book pretty middle of the road for me is Norman Daniels, our cliched villain. King has three types of male antagonists: women beaters, child molesters, and racists. Norman Daniels suffers from the former and the latter while having also been molested as a child. I'm not a huge fan of the whole molested-people-turn-into-monsters storyline. I know it happens, that the cycle can continue (not all the time, but it does happen), I just don't like reading about it. I would much rather read about someone overcoming their past instead of becoming it. I like to see damaged children beat the odds. Call me an optimist in that regard. Things this book does well are as follows: awesome protagonist (Rosie is one of King's best female characters, says this guy [cue eye rolls]); the gore toward the end of the book is classic King and disturbing as hell; the Dark Tower tie-ins; the thematic elements; the bull mask. Yeah, I dug all that. And if you dig King, I think you will too. Expect spoilers for several King books if you click on View Spoiler. You've been warned. (view spoiler)[Obvious Tie-Ins: Ka Paul Sheldon (his Misery novels are mentioned half a dozen times throughout the book) Susan Day (Insomnia) Rose Madder turns into a spider creature, much like Pennywise and Mordred. Theoretical Tie-Ins: Any of you that read my Decade with King posts will know that I believe all of King's books tie into one of three things: It, The Tommyknockers, or the Dark Tower series. Well, all the glowing green shit in this book makes me think the Temple of the Bull might be somehow connected to the Great Old Ones from the Prim. Perhaps the temple is where the Grays were worshipped once upon a when? It does beg the question... (hide spoiler)] In summation: There are much better Stephen King books, there are much worse Stephen King books. If you read all his books in order from Carrie to (as of writing this review) Revival, you should hit this one about the right time. In other words, I would place it smack dab in the middle, exactly where it lands in his career's timeline. Final Judgment: Not everything in this temple is bullshit.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Felina

    This is definately my least favorite of the King books I've read so far. I simultaniously loved and hated this book. There were no parts that I just liked...seriously I was either loving it or hating it. Clearly since I gave it 3 stars I loved more parts then I hated. First the good stuff. As usual Kings take on a crazy person is always amazing and terrifying. My first King book was Misery and I just love his crazy villians. I was actually getting a little bored with the book until Rosie found he This is definately my least favorite of the King books I've read so far. I simultaniously loved and hated this book. There were no parts that I just liked...seriously I was either loving it or hating it. Clearly since I gave it 3 stars I loved more parts then I hated. First the good stuff. As usual Kings take on a crazy person is always amazing and terrifying. My first King book was Misery and I just love his crazy villians. I was actually getting a little bored with the book until Rosie found her painting and the weird stuff, that makes me love King so much, started to happen. I was entranced during Rosies whole 'adventure' in the painting trying to find the baby. I wish a few things had been explained a little more but he kind of left me to make up my own mind which is always bittersweet anyways. And, of course, I loved the Misery references in this book. It made me feel like I was part of a special group of people who were in the know. *wink wink* Now what I did not like. There was an aspect of this book that was so beyond reality and completely fake and phoney that I don't think even King pulled it off. His name was Bill. Rosie's heart of gold, love at first sight, commitment loving boyfriend. Hello...LAME! "I've known you for two weeks and spent a total of 3 hours with you but I'm in love with you and I want to handle all of your baggage as well as your completely insane husband and take you away on my white horse." Total bull shit. I kept expecting this dewey-eyed chick-lit cliche to turn into a hard core dose of reality, which is usually Kings specialty. Something a little more... "You know what Rosie, you're great and I really like you but this is a little to much for me." Which would be totally understandable and expected from any normal guy who doesn't want his penis bitten off by Stormin' Norman. Holy Christ...Nora Roberts fans don't even buy this guy. And I'm pretty sure I heard Nicholas Sparks call him a pussy. Keep in mind that not all woman are waiting around for a white knight to rescue them on his valient steed. Some of us want realistic relationships with realistic men. This character almost completely ruined the female empowerment in this book... ...almost, until Gertie's scene with Normie in the amusement park. The woman's lib fanatic in me was jumping for joy when she pee'd all over his face but mostly when she called him a queer boy (I think that was her term) and he couldn't believe a woman was talking to him in that respect. Yep, Normie, its a woman...standing up for herself and being strong. Suck it!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cody | codysbookshelf

    Stephen King once famously proclaimed himself the Big Mac and fries of literature — meaning his works are popular and enjoyable, albeit perhaps lacking in nourishment. I heartily disagree with that assessment, for the most part. Novels such as IT, Dolores Claiborne, and The Dead Zone are intricate, multi-layered masterstrokes; methinks King is too modest in regards to his own creations. However. . . the Maine author's observation does hold true in a few select cases. Christine is a barrel of fun Stephen King once famously proclaimed himself the Big Mac and fries of literature — meaning his works are popular and enjoyable, albeit perhaps lacking in nourishment. I heartily disagree with that assessment, for the most part. Novels such as IT, Dolores Claiborne, and The Dead Zone are intricate, multi-layered masterstrokes; methinks King is too modest in regards to his own creations. However. . . the Maine author's observation does hold true in a few select cases. Christine is a barrel of fun, but it certainly offers no depth. That's cool. King's 1983 novel about a haunted car is campy horror at its campiest. I think I would put Rose Madder in the Big Mac and fries category, too: while fun and involving, one comes away feeling full but perhaps not particularly satisfied. This is a brutal, hard-edged tale of spousal abuse, escape, and recovery. The main character is Rose, a woman dealt physical and mental trauma from her husband for fourteen years. Rose Madder is her journey to self-discovery and freedom. Like previous novels Gerald's Game and Dolores Claiborne, King takes an unflinching and daring look at femininity and what it takes to be a woman in the modern age. And, for the most part, he succeeds. Perhaps my biggest problem with this story is not the infamous magical painting Rose escapes into (a plot point that didn't work for me the first time around, but I had a bit more fun with it on this reread), but Norman — the abusive husband. This dude is so over-the-top it's unreal. King is a master at creating despicable, terrifying humans; it's nothing short of fascinating that he failed so completely with Norman. He's a walking cliche, and King never takes the time to give the reader any reason to sympathize with him. He's just CRAAAAAAAAAYYYYYY from literally page one, and he only gets worse. Because of that, much of this novel's potential menace is lost. Shame. That said, the mythological elements of this novel . . . are interesting. They don't always work, and sometimes they seem awkwardly juxtaposed with the woman-on-the-run thriller feel, but it's whatever. King would explore escaping into an alternate, mythic world to better effect in Lisey's Story. Rose Madder is Stephen King at his most average. While containing interesting ideas, some captivating prose (especially that prologue — sheeeeesh!), and a serviceable main character in Rose, this novel just feels tired, inessential. At times I got the sense King was getting bored with the story, and was ready to finish the damn thing. Recommended, but perhaps only for King completists. King Connections: There are a few tangential connections to Dark Tower, such as references to ka and the City of Lud. Paul Sheldon of Misery fame gets a few generous shoutouts. Favorite Quote: "In that instant she knew what it must feel like to cross a river into a foreign country, and then set fire to the bridge behind you, and stand on the riverbank, watching and breathing deeply as your only chance of retreat went up in smoke.” Up Next: I thought Desperation was next, but I forgot The Green Mile exists. Ha!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    The 31st book in my long-term Stephen King reading project and the first one I had never read before. Considering common opinion (including King's own) and my friends views, I enjoyed more than I thought I would. However, it's far from without issues. For a long time I had a vague idea about men like Rose's husband. I imagined that somewhere along the way something went wrong and what causes the rest of us to behave like human beings was lost in them. The abundance of them made me refine my theo The 31st book in my long-term Stephen King reading project and the first one I had never read before. Considering common opinion (including King's own) and my friends views, I enjoyed more than I thought I would. However, it's far from without issues. For a long time I had a vague idea about men like Rose's husband. I imagined that somewhere along the way something went wrong and what causes the rest of us to behave like human beings was lost in them. The abundance of them made me refine my theory and now I think whatever is missing in their heads was never there in the first place. When the rest of humanity evolved, a large group remained primitive, Homo Wasteofspaceis, a pitiful branch on the family tree that later took a turn for the worse... Anyway, much can be said about them, but best is probably to just avoid them altogether. Reading about them is no fun, and it's probably not good for you to read a book being seriously angry all the time. Being inside one's head, well, anyplace is probably more pleasurable. Besides all the vitriolic, ugly, hateful thoughts that I would be fine without, I did not get this guy's similes and references at all, at one point he refers to a character that he does not perceive as a threat at all to be "as dangerous as Bambi's friend Thumper". I don't get it at all. What's not to fear? Ah, I needed that! I'll stick to the story now. The first half of the book is really good and I enjoyed it very much. At the mid-point, though, something changed and I had troubles just keeping focus on what was happening (which really wasn't much) over the course of a few chapters (that felt really long). Not had I more than realized I was drifting - (view spoiler)[ until the Dark tower-references started dropping in. The book reminded me a bit about Lisey's Story, but, when the dream sequences/traveling work well in that one, here I was bored silly in fantasy land for some reason. But this was never a huge problem, because quite soon (hide spoiler)] - the story was back on track. King does play quite a bit with our emotions, but hey, who's not a sucker for a bit of feel-good, 'aww, that's nice', 'how cute', once in a while? So, a few words on the ending. It's long. A lot of what is happening is first told from Rose's perspective - and then the very same happenings are told from the husbands perspective. Two faults here; it drags out a lot, and, we're back inside that horrible mind again! Because of the ending and the middle part this gets the "liked it" rating from me. Much better than its reputation I would say.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nick Iuppa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really believe that Rose Madder contains one of the most relentless, heart stopping pursuits in any novel anywhere, and - in Norman Daniels - the strongest villain in any of King’s work. King doesn’t just describe Norman Daniels’s actions in Rose Madder; he gets inside the monster’s head and in the process shows us the kind of thoughts that motivate a violent murderer. Rose McClendon married Norman right after high school, suffered a vicious bite from him on their wedding night, and from then I really believe that Rose Madder contains one of the most relentless, heart stopping pursuits in any novel anywhere, and - in Norman Daniels - the strongest villain in any of King’s work. King doesn’t just describe Norman Daniels’s actions in Rose Madder; he gets inside the monster’s head and in the process shows us the kind of thoughts that motivate a violent murderer. Rose McClendon married Norman right after high school, suffered a vicious bite from him on their wedding night, and from then on her life became one long nightmare of abusive violence. If things weren’t done Norman’s way, done just right, there was hell to pay... and it was physical hell. Rose was beaten for things like not washing the floor thoroughly enough, reading romance novels, and getting pregnant. It was getting pregnant that landed Rose in the hospital, the baby beaten to death within her. She put up with all this for fourteen years, and then one day, when she noticed a drop of blood from last night’s beating on her bed sheet and knew she’d either have to change the sheets yet again or face more abuse, Rosie just walked out of the house forever. She took Norman’s ATM card and split. What follows is really a story of liberation. One that cuts back and forth between Norman’s raging plans to make his wife pay for the effrontery of leaving him and Rose’s escape into a new life. That life turns out to be far more wonderful than she could ever have imagined. It isn’t just the absence of pain; it’s a world of friends, a lover, and a magical painting she discovers in a pawnshop. The painting becomes a key focus in the story. It shows Rose the image of a strong woman standing on a hillside (a woman who inspires Rose to be strong whenever she’s overcome with doubt or fear), and Rose eventually learns that she can step into the panting, and have amazing though sometimes terrifying new experiences there. Meanwhile, as Rose’s new life improves, Norman draws ever closer, just as she knew he would. How is King is able to gain such a keen grasp of the mind of a sicko like Norman? I’m sure there were mountains of research and discussions with experts. Norman is a cop, a great cop, and he’s internalized police procedures to the highest degree. I can see King in long conversations with guys who know the ways and whiles of the police force and its most aberrant practitioners. Still, I think there’s more to it than that. In a word, it’s genius... maybe King’s greatest genius. He’s such a keen observer of people that he’s able to create believable characters even when they’re monsters. He can enter Norman’s mind, piece together his intentions, reconstruct his thoughts, and give us a clear-cut rationalization for all those brutal actions. When Norman shows up, terrorizes, and murders the very people who saved Rose when she arrived in her new city (has to be Chicago), the painting becomes even more alive. Crickets hop out of the scene and into her bed; the painting’s moonlight fills the room even on the darkest nights. Then the image takes over one whole wall of Rosie’s apartment, and she’s lured inside. Rose does a favor for that woman on the hill... a favor that the woman says she will REPAY. It’s at this moment that the story starts to get even stranger than most of us would ever have expected. Up until now it’s been a terrifying and very real tale of pursuit; now it becomes surreal and horrific. The woman (named Rose Madder for the color of her gown and the words scrawled in charcoal on the back of the painting) is not the sweet motherly type we might have imagined. She’s not just there to help Rose; she’s a monster in her own right, stark raving mad and in the process of being consumed by some flesh-crusting illness. But she also serves a liberating purpose because, when Norman chases Rose into the painting, Rose Madder is more than happy to confront him, reveal her truest self, and basically eat him alive. Teetering on the brink of continued violence from then on, Rose Madder exercises scary self-control as she warns Rosie that she has to do certain things to be able to lead a happy life. Oh, and Rose had better get the hell out of the paining while she can. Rose does escape. She marries the wonderful guy she met earlier, has a sweet daughter, but she’s suddenly possessed by a new and terrible temper. Rosie pictures herself carrying out some of the same kinds of cruel actions that Norman performed. (Guess she couldn’t have been that much of a victim without learning about the allure of violence.) And now Rose begins to fear that her anger with turn her into the very being she encountered in the painting. Rose Madder might have been a preview of what Rosie is to become. King sometimes uses symbols and at other times avoids them. In this case it sure looks like the crusts growing on Rose Madder might be emblematic of the anger that has transferred from Norman to her, taking over her life, turning her into the same kind of monster who had so persecuted Rose. Good news. By carefully following the ritualistic steps that Rose Madder outlined for her, Rose overcomes her anger, and then, one day, when performing the very last task out on a hilly slope that does resemble the one in the painting, Rose realizes that she’s overcome her demons. She’s free. She doesn’t have any of the crusted growths that she saw on the crazy woman. She’s not destined to become Rose Madder. HAPPY ENDING. I get the feeling that King is channeling more folks than Norman Daniels in this one. Shakespeare seems to have worked his way in there too... and probably Euripides.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    Great suspense. Wife runs from her abusive husband who is now tracking her. STORY BRIEF: The first 10% is Rose living with Norman. They’ve been married fourteen years. He bites, stabs, and punches her. (Most of this harm is told rather than shown so it’s a little less painful for the reader.) The next 80% is Rose leaving Norman, surviving with help from an organization, meeting someone, and Norman’s search for her. The organization helps abused women on the run. The women in the organization have Great suspense. Wife runs from her abusive husband who is now tracking her. STORY BRIEF: The first 10% is Rose living with Norman. They’ve been married fourteen years. He bites, stabs, and punches her. (Most of this harm is told rather than shown so it’s a little less painful for the reader.) The next 80% is Rose leaving Norman, surviving with help from an organization, meeting someone, and Norman’s search for her. The organization helps abused women on the run. The women in the organization have some good parts in the story. REVIEWER’S OPINION: Most of the book is suspense. I was on the edge of my seat. I didn’t want to stop. I was afraid of this monstrous abusive cop husband Norman. He’s tracking her. He’s ultra smart and cunning. He’s cruel and killing others to get to her. I was fascinated with Norman’s thoughts, his plans, his words, his actions. Parts of the story were weird and different which I loved, like the oddness of Norman using a bull’s head mask. I loved the author’s creativity being inside Norman’s head. This was better than a demon. This was a human monster. I loved how Rose became strong and her actions. I was intrigued with her anger and rage. She started out as a wimp, but she didn’t stay that way. There is a paranormal element, but it’s secondary or a small part of the story. The paranormal idea was ok, but I probably would have liked the story just as well without it. Many suspense stories disappoint me when characters do stupid things to put themselves in danger. None of that here. Almost everyone did smart things - good guys and the bad guy. I was pleased with the story going several years into the future after the main crisis was resolved, like a long epilogue. It was satisfying, and it was a feel good happy ending. One area bothered me. There is a long dream-like scene in the middle of the book. It was a little boring due to a lot of description and it took her a long time to walk somewhere. I wanted the dream to hurry up so I could get back to the story. There are two sex scenes involving men touching men, one of them torture. Another scene has a woman rear-door raped. AUDIOBOOK ISSUES: Great music introducing the bad guy scenes. It was deep and monstrous with words similar to “hate hate...hate...” Sadly I did not like Stephen King narrating the bad guy parts. I like SK as a person, and I kept thinking of SK as a nice guy. His voice does not fit the bad guy. It would be so much better with a deeper voiced male actor doing those scenes, something compatible with the bad guy music. I hope they produce another version with a different male narrator. I was very happy with SK narrating his nonfiction book “On Writing” but not this book. Blair Brown was excellent and easily 5 stars narrating the Rose parts. DATA: Narrative mode: 3rd person Rose and Norman. Unabridged audiobook reading time: 17 hrs and 28 mins. Swearing language: strong including religious swear words, sexual, ethnic, and racial slurs. Sexual language: strong. Number of sex scenes: four. Setting: mostly 1994 a town in eastern U.S. and a large city in the midwest. Book copyright: 1995. Genre: suspense thriller with a little paranormal, abused women. Ending: happy for the main good guys, bad for the bad guy. OTHER BOOKS: For a list of my reviews of other Stephen King books, see my 5 star review of Carrie. http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abbie | ab_reads

    A blend of horrific reality and mythical fantasy, Rose Madder came out of the left field and surprised me in the best way! I've seen a lot of less-than-positive reviews of this particular King, but I loved it. I loved the Greek mythology references, I loved the main character Rosie McClendon, I loved the raw, brutal story, everything! The prologue really sets the tone for the rest of the novel, it's one of the hardest things I've ever had to read. It's not for the fainthearted and there's a lot o A blend of horrific reality and mythical fantasy, Rose Madder came out of the left field and surprised me in the best way! I've seen a lot of less-than-positive reviews of this particular King, but I loved it. I loved the Greek mythology references, I loved the main character Rosie McClendon, I loved the raw, brutal story, everything! The prologue really sets the tone for the rest of the novel, it's one of the hardest things I've ever had to read. It's not for the fainthearted and there's a lot of scenes with graphic details of domestic and sexual abuse, so beware. As usual, I cannot fault King's writing; the style is sometimes repetitive especially near the beginning, but I think he perfectly captures the mindset of a terrified, paranoid victim of abuse and, again, shows that he's so much more than just a horror writer. Despite abuse being a prominent plot point, there are also some beautifully poignant passages about love that rival those in Lisey's Story. Of course, there is a fair share of horror in Rose Madder! Norman Daniels is possibly King's worst creation. A despicable, violent, just all round fucked up man, the parts of the narrative told from his perspective are EXTREMELY unsettling and disturbing. There's also some great horror scenes through the painting, which I can see how they could be confusing, but I didn't have a problem with them! As well as Rosie, my favourite part about this novel were all of the King easter eggs!! Constant readers will have an absolute field day here, with ties to Dark Tower, The Talisman, Misery, and maybe even Lisey's Story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Timbo Jones

    This is without a doubt the worst Stephen King book I've read. Why he felt the need to add the fantasy element in I don't know, but I found it absolutely ridiculous. Norman Daniels (the psychopath husband) was almost a caricature more than a character. A purely evil, hateful man with no redeeming qualities whatsoever, yet we're expected to believe this psycopath functions perfectly well in the police force and is a highly decorated detective? Trying to imagine this man being sympathetic and kind This is without a doubt the worst Stephen King book I've read. Why he felt the need to add the fantasy element in I don't know, but I found it absolutely ridiculous. Norman Daniels (the psychopath husband) was almost a caricature more than a character. A purely evil, hateful man with no redeeming qualities whatsoever, yet we're expected to believe this psycopath functions perfectly well in the police force and is a highly decorated detective? Trying to imagine this man being sympathetic and kind to victims of serious crime, being a credible witness in court etc is impossible for me to do. It's a shame, because I liked the idea of a much-abused wife finally 'snapping', taking hubby's bank card, then running off to try to start a new life elsewhere and the cop husband trying to track her down. Sure, it's not original, but King could've made it work. Instead, he made a half-arsed (assed, if you're American!)fantasy novel. I'm one of those people who can't give up on a book once I've read past the first few chapters, so I stuck with it til the end. Poor writing, poor characterisation, with ridiculous fantasy elements included. Recommended to absolutely no one; a terrible novel.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Rose Madder is part of a group of King books I had yet not read. Well, I'm glad I did. Like his best efforts, it is character driven. And in Rose Daniels/McClendon King supplies one of the best characters in all the books I've read by him. On the dark side of things, her abusive husband is one of his darkest villains. What makes both so interesting is that they are also complex. Rose, whose innocence covers a core of rage; and Norman, who for all of his brutality, is ultimately pathetic. What Ki Rose Madder is part of a group of King books I had yet not read. Well, I'm glad I did. Like his best efforts, it is character driven. And in Rose Daniels/McClendon King supplies one of the best characters in all the books I've read by him. On the dark side of things, her abusive husband is one of his darkest villains. What makes both so interesting is that they are also complex. Rose, whose innocence covers a core of rage; and Norman, who for all of his brutality, is ultimately pathetic. What King offers up is not a black and white universe. And of course there is a whole slew of lesser but well drawn characters that propel the story along. As a novel, the plotting is pretty good. However, somewhere around page 400 I thought, from a pacing point of view, King should have wrapped things up. But that would of left out Norman's horrible Bacchae-like fate (which practically has you feeling sorry for him - some things ARE worse than death), and an ending that did seem, though strangely cryptic, right. There is some padding, but not nearly enough to give me Tommyknocker nightmares. There is mention here from others about King's Dark Tower series, and the symbolism King employs in Rose Madder. Since I have not read those books, I can't comment on how effectively that works. I am aware of King's statements regarding how he is trying to tie much of his work together in such a way it relates to the Dark Tower series. To some extent I think this is (in a number of cases) an after the fact effort by King - and a mistake. Whatever. By itself, the symbolism of Rose Madder is somewhat confusing, but I think the real-world rooting of the story helps the reader skate over these areas fairly lightly, with entertainment trumping confusion. However, Madder does veer from a dark fairy tale beginning, into Greek mythology, and closes with what some might consider a Christian allegory. Basically, Wrath is a deadly sin, and Norman's fate is linked to that fact. Rose herself is warned of her own susceptibility to anger - even if it is well justified. Rose's remembrance of the "tree" is simply a need to bury the past. Read tree here as "cross," but in a way that supersedes the earlier mythological meaning (King getting deep here). Otherwise, Madder will become madness, as the spider goddess (clearly Diana) warns Rose. Underscoring this Christian take on Madder, is the goddess being restrained by Dorcas (see the New Testament). Good stuff, with King (successfully) stretching himself, while still operating within genre. Not an easy thing to do.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Franco Santos

    La mente despierta conoce el concepto del sueño, pero para la persona que sueña no existe el mundo de la vigilia, el mundo real, la cordura; la confusión demencial del sueño. Rose McClendon Daniels durmió inmersa en la locura de su marido durante otros nueve años. Es un buen libro de King. No es de lo mejor, pero se deja leer. Es una novela que engancha desde el principio. Ya con ese prólogo es imposible no seguir leyendo. El autor nos escribe sobre Rose Daniels, una mujer que trata de escapar de La mente despierta conoce el concepto del sueño, pero para la persona que sueña no existe el mundo de la vigilia, el mundo real, la cordura; la confusión demencial del sueño. Rose McClendon Daniels durmió inmersa en la locura de su marido durante otros nueve años. Es un buen libro de King. No es de lo mejor, pero se deja leer. Es una novela que engancha desde el principio. Ya con ese prólogo es imposible no seguir leyendo. El autor nos escribe sobre Rose Daniels, una mujer que trata de escapar del demente y maltratador de su marido mientras él la busca desquiciadamente. Me gustó mucho que King, sacando el lado de fantasía (el cuadro), nos muestra una realidad; algo que muchas mujeres viven. Y partiendo de esa realidad, nos muestra cómo una mujer decide decir "basta" y se escapa de esa violencia. Nos muestra cómo ella siente los miedos, las inseguridades, hasta la culpa; cómo trata de empezar una nueva vida. En algunas partes se me hizo bastante pesado, sin embargo nunca llegó al punto de aburrirme. Tiene un final bastante bueno. Buen libro.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Monreau

    Ich habe es als Hörbuch gehört und muss sagen, dass die Stimme der Dame das Hörbuch sehr ansprechend gemacht hat. Wenn ich mich nicht arg täusche, war es die Synchronstimme unserer Anny Wilkes aus dem Roman 'Sie' oder auch 'Berta' aus der Serie 'Two and a half men'. Die Geschichte begann sofort spannend und auch, wenn es nach meinem Empfinden wieder sehr viele Längen gab, hat mir das Buch doch im Allgemeinen recht gut gefallen. Da das ganze Geschehen etwas ins Surreale rutscht, fand ich es umso Ich habe es als Hörbuch gehört und muss sagen, dass die Stimme der Dame das Hörbuch sehr ansprechend gemacht hat. Wenn ich mich nicht arg täusche, war es die Synchronstimme unserer Anny Wilkes aus dem Roman 'Sie' oder auch 'Berta' aus der Serie 'Two and a half men'. Die Geschichte begann sofort spannend und auch, wenn es nach meinem Empfinden wieder sehr viele Längen gab, hat mir das Buch doch im Allgemeinen recht gut gefallen. Da das ganze Geschehen etwas ins Surreale rutscht, fand ich es umso spannender zu sehen, was Stephen King daraus gemacht hat. Und natürlich gefällt dem Leser das, was da passiert, denn die meisten von uns werden auf Rose' Seite stehen. Das Bild, welches hier eine große Rolle spielt, ist eine interessante Sache und hebt die Geschichte wirklich von anderen ab. Lesenswert ist es allemal und spannend. Ein Tipp von mir. (:

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brent Soderstrum

    This contains both the good and bad (well not really bad) of Stephen King. I really loved the part of the book where he descibes Rose's relationship with her abusive husband, how she breaks away finally from that and then runs away from him across the country. Norman, a police officer hunts Rose down and begins to eliminate those who try to interfere with his pursuit of his wife. Great characters who are described in depth. The bad part of the book begins with the painting Rose buys for her new a This contains both the good and bad (well not really bad) of Stephen King. I really loved the part of the book where he descibes Rose's relationship with her abusive husband, how she breaks away finally from that and then runs away from him across the country. Norman, a police officer hunts Rose down and begins to eliminate those who try to interfere with his pursuit of his wife. Great characters who are described in depth. The bad part of the book begins with the painting Rose buys for her new apartment and the fantasy adventure she has going into the painting. Too weird and the story just isn't tied up they way you would like it at the end. Stephen King is my favorite author but when he travels down the fantasy route he often leaves my interest. You do see the man's talent however.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samadrita

    The best thing about the book was perhaps the beginning. Inspite of being an author of the horror genre King brought out the brutality of domestic abuse so terrifyingly well. I remember beads of sweat collecting on my forehead while reading the opening.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This is Stephen King so of course I did enjoy it, simply because I love his writing, but I don't think this is one of his best. The story of an abused woman finally leaving her husband and him going after her is a good premise. For me, I just aren't convinced that the "supernatural" aspect of the story added anything extra. It was entertaining enough for me without the "magic" painting and everything that came with that. I did enjoy the way in which the author portrayed Rose. She began as a weak w This is Stephen King so of course I did enjoy it, simply because I love his writing, but I don't think this is one of his best. The story of an abused woman finally leaving her husband and him going after her is a good premise. For me, I just aren't convinced that the "supernatural" aspect of the story added anything extra. It was entertaining enough for me without the "magic" painting and everything that came with that. I did enjoy the way in which the author portrayed Rose. She began as a weak woman, after years of abuse, and got stronger as the story progressed. She was a likeable protagonist as well. This was still a very good read for me, and I found it hard to put down sometimes, but I do love this author and most everything he writes so I still gave this 4 stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Todd Western-Normanton

    This book was the most amazing Stephen King book I have read to date! It was absolutely amazing and would make the most awesome movie! Stephen King is very skilled in character building when it comes to villains- e.g. Annie Wilkes from Misery, The Mad Cop from Desperation or Pennywise from IT. Norman Daniels is main character Rose's abusively psychotic cop husband. After 14 years of abuse and mistreatment, Rose runs away which causes Norman to come after her. Norman scared me a bit as he was unp This book was the most amazing Stephen King book I have read to date! It was absolutely amazing and would make the most awesome movie! Stephen King is very skilled in character building when it comes to villains- e.g. Annie Wilkes from Misery, The Mad Cop from Desperation or Pennywise from IT. Norman Daniels is main character Rose's abusively psychotic cop husband. After 14 years of abuse and mistreatment, Rose runs away which causes Norman to come after her. Norman scared me a bit as he was unpredictable and vicious. There was quite the high body count in the book. But what I really enjoyed was the element of Greek Mythology and the 'other world' inside of Rose's painting. Overall this book was absolutely fantastic! A must read! I do hope to see this adapted on the big screen one day. This would make a spectacular film.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Megan Lucas

    While reading this book I kept forgetting that it was a Stephen King novel. It has it's twists and turns (as his usual work does) but this was so much more than good vs. evil. Rose Madder is an emotional account of an abused woman who is trying to break free from a tormenting life, and has what is portrayed as a psychological break through as she goes on a journey to be free. King also touches on the downfalls of the system that fails to protect women from situations like Rose is in. Unfortunate While reading this book I kept forgetting that it was a Stephen King novel. It has it's twists and turns (as his usual work does) but this was so much more than good vs. evil. Rose Madder is an emotional account of an abused woman who is trying to break free from a tormenting life, and has what is portrayed as a psychological break through as she goes on a journey to be free. King also touches on the downfalls of the system that fails to protect women from situations like Rose is in. Unfortunately there is some graphical and language issues throughout the book, but I would expect to see them in this type of dialogue.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tonkica

    Savrseno napeto i s gropom u zelucu citajuci i iscekivati tko ce ovdje izvuci deblji kraj. I onda paranormalni dio koji ljulja cijeli tijek i razbija ono odlicno u knjizi. Joj kako bih voljela da tog dijela nije bilo! :P

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    It's a 3.7. Better than the last time I read it. Norman Daniels is really, really scary. I don't think the supernatural elements in this work nearly as well as they usually do for King. And the final third of the novel is the weakest for me. That's always a bummer.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Krissy

    Started out really strong. Then it lost me once Rosie stepped into the painting. I think this book would have been much better without the paranormal aspect added to it. Plus once the bad guy is taken care of towards the end the story should have quickly wrapped up. Unfortunately it didn't. It continued for a good minute after that. After such a long audiobook I just wanted it to be over already.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Trawick

    Not my usual kind of book. I loved the writing. I could have done without the fantasy part, but the entire book and title hinged upon it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Branwen Sedai *of the White Ajah*

    The whole world is waking up, she thought. It isn't just me. She stayed where she was for a moment longer, like an animal which has been kept in a cage so long it cannot believe in freedom even when it is offered. She reached behind her and touched the know of the door-the door that led into her cage. "No more", she whispered. She tucked her purse under one arm and took her first dozen steps into the fogbank which was now her future. After surviving fourteen years in an abusive marriage, Rosie McC The whole world is waking up, she thought. It isn't just me. She stayed where she was for a moment longer, like an animal which has been kept in a cage so long it cannot believe in freedom even when it is offered. She reached behind her and touched the know of the door-the door that led into her cage. "No more", she whispered. She tucked her purse under one arm and took her first dozen steps into the fogbank which was now her future. After surviving fourteen years in an abusive marriage, Rosie McClendon flees her old life and husband behind and starts anew. She ends up across the country in a new place and after some help begins to put her life together again. When she comes across an old oil painting in a pawn shop she feels drawn to purchase it. She hangs it in her new place and takes strength from the blond haired woman in the painting. She's going to need all the strength she can get. Because her old life isn't completely behind her. Her ex husband is not only a cop, he's insane. And driven to find the woman who dared to escape from him. "That's really all art is about, I think, and not just pictures-it's the same with books and stories and sculptures and even castles in the sand. Some things call to us, that's all. It's as if the people who made them were speaking inside our heads." The Stand is not only my number one favorite Stephen King books but my number one favorite book of all time. For awhile, It, was number two. But after finishing this I might have to bump old Pennywise out of that number two slot and replace him with this book. Because awesome really doesn't even begin to describe this book. One of the things that I love about King's writing is how completely developed his characters are. Some people may complain that this book took awhile to get started, but that's not the case. Not really. King simply uses the first part of the book to make you completely and utterly see the world from Rosie's eyes. You see all the way inside of her, really feel the kind of person she is. And that makes her journey throughout this book really memorable and special. This is more of a fantasy novel than a horror novel in my opinion. A painting with magical powers helps a young woman find the strength she needs to take control of her life. Sure, there are some terrifying parts in it. Her ex husband, Norman, is probably one of the scariest bastards you will ever read about! But there is a sense of wonder than permeates this book that you tend to see more with fantasy. Either way, this is a remarkable book filled with fantastic characters and a suspenseful storyline! "After awhile, battered women start accepting the blame. And not just for some things either-for everything. I didn't understand that for a long time. But now I think I do. Someone has to be the blame, or all the pain and depression and isolation make no sense. You'd go crazy. Better to be guilty than crazy. But it's time for you to get past that choice, Rosie."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Turner

    Audiobook – Narrated by Blair Brown – Just an ok narration. I don’t particularly care for female narrators so Blair Brown really wasn’t what I wanted to hear. I was at the “almost ready to give up” stage when who should drop by and join the cast? The author himself (he wasn't listed as narrator). What a great surprise and the only reason I finished listening to the audio. *** Ebook: 4**** (Better than a 3 but not quite a 4) I hated the first part of this book. I was bored witless, and I probably had Audiobook – Narrated by Blair Brown – Just an ok narration. I don’t particularly care for female narrators so Blair Brown really wasn’t what I wanted to hear. I was at the “almost ready to give up” stage when who should drop by and join the cast? The author himself (he wasn't listed as narrator). What a great surprise and the only reason I finished listening to the audio. *** Ebook: 4**** (Better than a 3 but not quite a 4) I hated the first part of this book. I was bored witless, and I probably hadn’t helped things along by starting the audio first. I don’t enjoy female narrators as a rule and Blair Brown has been added to the list. Unfortunately, by the time I started reading, Brown’s Rose was already fixed in my head…and she irritated the crap out of me. I kept pushing and I’m glad I did. The story picked up steam through the second part of the book and never looked back; and I enjoyed the sharp left into fantasy. I love it when King takes me to other worlds. A thoroughly good read but I probably won’t ever bother picking it up again. *** CONNECTIONS, COINCIDENCES & CHESTNUTS: Rose was reading “Misery’s Journey” by Paul Sheldon (Misery, The Library Policeman), which led to her husband’s brutal attack. Rosie saw Anna Stevenson reading “Misery’s Lover.” Daughters & Sisters, a shelter for battered women (Desperation) Anna Stevenson (Desperation) Norman Daniels, Rose’s husband (Desperation) Gert Kinshaw (Desperation) Cynthia Smith (Desperation) Paul Sheldon/Paul Sheldon’s Books (Misery, IT, The Library Policeman, Desperation) Ka (DT2: The Drawing of the Three, DT3: The Wastelands, DT4: Wizard and Glass, DT5: The Wolves of the Calla, DT6: Song of Susannah, DT7: The Dark Tower, The Little Sisters of Eluria, Insomnia, The Tommyknockers.) The City of Lud – DT3: The Wastelands.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Madiha Riaz

    A fine example of books that start out brilliantly, lose the grip somewhere in between, and just go downhill from there. I cannot believe I finished it. My only motivation behind finishing it was to find out if the end is really what I was thinking of. And no, it was worse. An abused wife runs away from home; the descriptive scenes, the in-depth psychological insights about the male and female protagonists were just awesome. They hooked to me the book. And I had heard so much about Stephen King, A fine example of books that start out brilliantly, lose the grip somewhere in between, and just go downhill from there. I cannot believe I finished it. My only motivation behind finishing it was to find out if the end is really what I was thinking of. And no, it was worse. An abused wife runs away from home; the descriptive scenes, the in-depth psychological insights about the male and female protagonists were just awesome. They hooked to me the book. And I had heard so much about Stephen King, I was so thrilled to find myself finally reading him. What a disappointment! What started out as an abused wife's escape from a demented and mentally sick husband, soon turned into something boringly-Halloween. I mean, the heroine actually going INTO the painting! The writer did not explain the relation of Rosie with the woman in the picture, and why was it necessary for Rosie to go into the picture in the first place, was unclear to me. What was the role of the fox in the novel? The heroin does not get the final revenge, and then she turns against her boyfriend and directs her rage towards him? The lovable heroin, that writer so beautifully and strongly portrayed in the beginning was lost, and what came out was just crap. and the end!!! My God, could it be more abysmal than that? That was the most disappointing end to any story I have ever read. It was made even more disappointing by the fact that I really really really liked the book initially. Such a waste of time. Anyway, I'm not going to let this one experience put me off of Stephen King forever. I'm going to give him another chance:) I've started reading Carrie - lets see if it helps me improve this writer's ratings.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Licinia

    Neste livro do Stephen King que começa de uma maneira bastante interessante, em que nós ficamos logo comovidos com o sofrimento de Rose Daniels, casada com Norman Daniels detective de profissão, que é vitima de violência doméstica e que depois de 14 anos casamento resolve sair de casa assim de rompante sem pensar e sem planeamento... E assim começa uma dupla narrativa, a de Rose a construir uma nova vida sempre no terror de ser descoberta e a de Norman na sua perseguição com contornos algo macabr Neste livro do Stephen King que começa de uma maneira bastante interessante, em que nós ficamos logo comovidos com o sofrimento de Rose Daniels, casada com Norman Daniels detective de profissão, que é vitima de violência doméstica e que depois de 14 anos casamento resolve sair de casa assim de rompante sem pensar e sem planeamento... E assim começa uma dupla narrativa, a de Rose a construir uma nova vida sempre no terror de ser descoberta e a de Norman na sua perseguição com contornos algo macabros, excêntricos e diferentes! Quanto ao dito quadro, que dá o titulo ao livro, e que Rose descobre numa casa de penhores pelo qual fica enfeitiçada e o compra, é uma presença sobrenatural e que transcende o que é real na história...e na minha opinião é o factor que estraga a história. A parte sobrenatural é bastante exagerada, acaba por se tornar demasiado fantástica, muito carregada de simbolismos alguns de difícil compreensão, e em que a Rose Madder (a figura central do quadro) é que resolve...

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