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Carry On, Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed

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An inspirational, sidesplittingly funny exploration of the power of living with love, forgiveness, and honesty. In Carry On, Warrior, Glennon Doyle Melton shares new stories and the best-loved material from Momastery.com She recounts her mistakes and triumphs with candor and humor, and gives language to our universal (yet often secret) experiences. She believes that by shed An inspirational, sidesplittingly funny exploration of the power of living with love, forgiveness, and honesty. In Carry On, Warrior, Glennon Doyle Melton shares new stories and the best-loved material from Momastery.com She recounts her mistakes and triumphs with candor and humor, and gives language to our universal (yet often secret) experiences. She believes that by shedding our armor, we can stop hiding, competing, striving for the mirage of perfection, and making motherhood, marriage, and friendship harder by pretending they’re not hard. In this one woman trying to love herself and others, readers find a wise and witty friend who will inspire them to forgive their own imperfections, make the most of their gifts, and commit to small acts of love that will change the world.


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An inspirational, sidesplittingly funny exploration of the power of living with love, forgiveness, and honesty. In Carry On, Warrior, Glennon Doyle Melton shares new stories and the best-loved material from Momastery.com She recounts her mistakes and triumphs with candor and humor, and gives language to our universal (yet often secret) experiences. She believes that by shed An inspirational, sidesplittingly funny exploration of the power of living with love, forgiveness, and honesty. In Carry On, Warrior, Glennon Doyle Melton shares new stories and the best-loved material from Momastery.com She recounts her mistakes and triumphs with candor and humor, and gives language to our universal (yet often secret) experiences. She believes that by shedding our armor, we can stop hiding, competing, striving for the mirage of perfection, and making motherhood, marriage, and friendship harder by pretending they’re not hard. In this one woman trying to love herself and others, readers find a wise and witty friend who will inspire them to forgive their own imperfections, make the most of their gifts, and commit to small acts of love that will change the world.

30 review for Carry On, Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    I really feel that I need to review this is two parts to accurately convey my feelings about this book, so I'm going to start with the nitty gritty here--the writing. I find books written from blogs to be problematic. Writing a book and writing a blog are not the same thing and, taking pieces from a blog and putting them into a book tends to be unsatisfying for me. A blog post does not a chapter make. I'm sure there have been blogs to books that are able to avoid this misstep, but Carry On, Warr I really feel that I need to review this is two parts to accurately convey my feelings about this book, so I'm going to start with the nitty gritty here--the writing. I find books written from blogs to be problematic. Writing a book and writing a blog are not the same thing and, taking pieces from a blog and putting them into a book tends to be unsatisfying for me. A blog post does not a chapter make. I'm sure there have been blogs to books that are able to avoid this misstep, but Carry On, Warrior is not one of them. Melton's writing is entertaining--in small doses. I suppose if I had had the luxury to read one chapter of this book every couple of days I might have found it more satisfying, but that was not the case. While there were passages, and sometimes entire chapters, that I found entertaining, the book as a whole was just too, well, bloggy. Carry On, Warrior also fell into the chronology trap. On a blog, you can follow whatever timeline your heart desires--it is one of the freedoms a blog allows. However, you cannot apply that same principle in a book. Melton seemed to be all over the place with her chronology. For example, she talked about wanting to adopt. Then she talked about not adopting, then she finished the book with the entire adoption drama. I really just couldn't keep things straight. Okay, part number two. If you are a fan of Melton's site, Momastery, you will like this book. In fact, I'd be surprised if you didn't absolutely love it. And you should stop reading this review right now. I will admit that I'm not a regular reader of her blog, but I "like" her on Facebook and sometimes I pop in to see what she's writing about. However, beyond that, I am a pretty clean slate when it comes to Glennon Doyle Melton. Now that I've said that, you can consider yourselves all warned about what I'm about to write. The truth of it is that I just didn't like her. Glennon Doyle Melton. I'm sure she is a very nice person and, yes, she is an entertaining blogger. I know she raises money for needy causes and generally tries to do good. But, she just isn't my cup of tea. After reading her book, I think I'd go batty if I were in her company for more than half an hour. I tried to pin down what it was that really got under my skin--and that is why I had to divide this review up. Once I got past the blog-like nature of this book, I realized what it was--and I'm sure I'm going to offend more than a few "Monkees" over this. Melton presents herself as some sort of spiritual leader and, frankly, she is far from having the chops for it. Humor and spirituality can go hand in hand, but glibness and spirituality really don't and, unfortunately, I found her more glib than humorous. As the book went on, I just found her more and more annoying. To make matters worse, I read some of her recent posts on her site, which contradict (for lack of a better word) what she has written in her book about her family. After that, I just didn't believe her anymore and, sadly, that is the kiss of death for me with a book. I originally (and generously) gave this book 3 stars, but I've since dropped the rating. Reviews are highly personal and I know that many people look up to Glennon Doyle, but I am not one of those people--and I'm not one of them because of this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sara Strand

    I will be honest- when I originally saw this tour available, I skipped over it as soon as I saw that it was written by the creator of momastry.com. Not because I have anything against the website, but because I really hate mommy bloggers. I hate the "my kids are my life and it's always amazing and I am so blessed by Jesus" bloggers. I really would like them to show up at my house when I'm performing an enema on a seven year old while my five year old screams that I'm not spending time with him. L I will be honest- when I originally saw this tour available, I skipped over it as soon as I saw that it was written by the creator of momastry.com. Not because I have anything against the website, but because I really hate mommy bloggers. I hate the "my kids are my life and it's always amazing and I am so blessed by Jesus" bloggers. I really would like them to show up at my house when I'm performing an enema on a seven year old while my five year old screams that I'm not spending time with him. Like if I had a choice, I would chose an enema over Lego's. But then I agreed I would do it and hot damn, I'm glad I did. Largely, my gripe about other moms is that they aren't really honest. If you can't be honest with yourself that's a shame but to not be honest with the outside world is equally terrible. I have, to the chagrin of my extended family, been honest on my blog to the point where it is embarrassing for them. They feel upset with me and they don't understand it. But you understand it, because you are maybe like me. Immediately what won me was a little paragraph towards the beginning that made me say YES, Glennon is my kind of girl. "After reading a few of my essays, my dad, Bubba, called and said, 'Glennon. Don't you think there are some things you should take to the grave?' I thought hard for a moment and said, 'No. I really don't. That sounds horrible to me. I don't want to take anything to the grave. I want to die used up and emptied out. I don't want to carry around anything that I don't have to. I want to travel light." And it just felt... good. It felt good to have someone else see it exactly as I do. Sure, some things I have to say maybe are embarrassing for someone else, or it makes them feel a certain way. But it's not really for me to worry about, is it? That means they have things they need to work through and it can't be my fault. I can't worry about that. So as I get older, I am getting closer and closer to dealing with things from my childhood that I know hinder me in some way as an adult. Slowly, I am getting there. But another theme through the book is how moms especially, feel a certain stigma about being honest. You know what, parenthood sometimes really sucks. And it's OK to say that. It doesn't make you a bad mother. Sometimes it is really hard to keep up appearances and be a really great mom, wife, friend, whatever. It's really hard to juggle it all and I am a poster child for that. Glennon struggled with addiction and other things during her younger years so she literally fell into motherhood completely not ready and anyone can appreciate that would be difficult. And one day in the park she decided to fuck it all, and she told another mom all of these things. Not only was it freeing to Glennon, but to the other mom as well. And think of how free you would feel if you just let it all go. Be honest. Live in the moment and not be worried about other people's perceptions of you. It would be momentous. Basically, I am telling you that as a vagina card carrying woman, you need this book. If you are a mother in any degree, you need this book. It does have a vein of religion in it which isn't my thing at all, but it's OK. I was able to pull enough out of it to overlook it. It's really just refreshing to read. It's not quite self help, but it's a memoir... kind of. Frankly, I don't know where you would peg this book but it's good nonetheless. And it also shows how no matter how put together you see a person, it's maybe hiding something totally different. http://strandupdate.blogspot.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jen Graham

    Goosebumps the whole time. Not just because I recently had my arms waxed, but because it's just that good. Raw. Real. Relatable. Carry On, Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed focuses on our sameness. Glennon Melton puts to ink the voice in so many of our heads. Not only when it's all polite, calm and well rested, but also (and more importantly) the jacked up, bath salts version, too. She gives us permission and encouragement to have pride in our crazy. Her uncanny ability to be unafraid and simult Goosebumps the whole time. Not just because I recently had my arms waxed, but because it's just that good. Raw. Real. Relatable. Carry On, Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed focuses on our sameness. Glennon Melton puts to ink the voice in so many of our heads. Not only when it's all polite, calm and well rested, but also (and more importantly) the jacked up, bath salts version, too. She gives us permission and encouragement to have pride in our crazy. Her uncanny ability to be unafraid and simultaneously entirely vulnerable, draws you in and builds you up. The book has the power to make you feel normal, comfortable, and accepted for exactly whoever you are. While at the same time, in her modest and unassuming way, Glennon shines light on all of the possibilities of what we each can do/be. Smart, kind, honest, funny, humble, emotionFULL- the book is like having her right there in your hands, and all to yourself. (Just not in the creepy Buffalo Bill, "I wanna skin you and wear you" way that sounded.) Glennon feels like a supportive friend, who's not only willing to show you her "uglies", but most certainly won't judge you for yours. Be prepared to laugh, cry, and love with her; and then want to do it all again!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I honestly don't think I've ever read such a narcissistic book before. After about 20 pages, I was already bored out of my mind with her overly-written pop psychobabble. I actually cringed when another reviewer compared her to Anne Lamott. For one thing, Lamott can actually write - and she doesn't have the savior complex that Melton does.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I'd never heard of Glennon Doyle Melton. I can't believe I haven't been reading Momastary. Glennon is the blogger I daren't be. She lives out loud and without apology. She has confidence in the person she is and the direction is going for the simple reason that she is solid in her faith in God and His Love for her. Before you tune out thinking this is another religious book, let me clarify. Many of her ideas on God resonate with me loud and clear. Some don't but it doesn't matter. What connects I'd never heard of Glennon Doyle Melton. I can't believe I haven't been reading Momastary. Glennon is the blogger I daren't be. She lives out loud and without apology. She has confidence in the person she is and the direction is going for the simple reason that she is solid in her faith in God and His Love for her. Before you tune out thinking this is another religious book, let me clarify. Many of her ideas on God resonate with me loud and clear. Some don't but it doesn't matter. What connects the loudest and clearest will connect with any person that believes in a Higher Power, regardless of religion or spiritual persuasion. Except atheist, I suppose. Agnostics will be filled with hope. Glennon is FUNNY! I mean, truly funny. She also brought me to my own epiphany when I looked her up and listened to an interview and researched her obsessively and Aaaawed all over her family and sighed all over her husband and cried all over her separation. If Glennon reads this review, I am certain she will understand my stalker like behavior. Glennon is an incredibly gifted writer who can not only articulate thoughts and feelings and experiences beautifully, but she has the courage to dig out the core truths of them all and write them. When I read her essays, she had a southern accent and she talked fast and with focus. Then I listened to an interview and realized she is not an outgoing, public speaker. I mean no disrespect because I get that. I really, really get that. I realized that I am not alone in my gift of writing and lack of gift of speaking. In fact, I'm an utter failure when public speaking. I'm okay with that but it disappoints me to disappoint others. On the other hand, there is Glennon, carrying on, giving her all, and stepping right up to her fear and sticking out her tongue at it. I love that. With perfect and focused honesty, Glennon shares her short road to sobriety (taking a pregnancy test), making a decision to choose every day to stay sober, raise her family, and live out loud. And don't even get me started on the essay she wrote one August when she made the decision that she was finished parenting her children until something significant differentiated one day from the other and when was school going to start again. I laughed and laughed. Because this woman is a mother who loves her children, her family, and the idea of being a mother and a wife. She is also a woman who tells the truth about the reality of daily living as a wife and mother. I have raged my own diatribes about well-meaning women who catch me in the grocery store with four children hanging off a basket while I'm trying to keep it from tipping over, wrestling a package of Oreos from another child before it gets opened only to realize that that isn't my child and that nice old lady smiles nostalgically and says, "Enjoy them while their young." I bite my tongue from telling the old lady to enjoy her ambulatory way of life while she can because death is creeping up on her. Because that would be rude and I'm nothing if not a pillar of politeness. There is so much more to say. Just read it. Love it. Love yourself and accept that you are perfect just the way you are.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    New record. 13 sticky tabs to mark important sections and thoughts....and I didn't start slapping them on until 1/3rd of the way through the book. Let me see if I can explain what I loved about this book. Glennon Doyle Melton is everyday natural. No trying to impress with her wisdom, astound with how far she has come in her recovery from drugs, alcohol and bulimia and no trying too hard to be funny. Although Glennon confesses to being a Christian, she doesn't bombard the reader with her beliefs. New record. 13 sticky tabs to mark important sections and thoughts....and I didn't start slapping them on until 1/3rd of the way through the book. Let me see if I can explain what I loved about this book. Glennon Doyle Melton is everyday natural. No trying to impress with her wisdom, astound with how far she has come in her recovery from drugs, alcohol and bulimia and no trying too hard to be funny. Although Glennon confesses to being a Christian, she doesn't bombard the reader with her beliefs. In fact, she finds little place in her life for Christian 'performance' but a lot of room for loving others with a naturalness, not a sticky, icky look-at-me kind of love. This was an important distinction for me, because in the beginning of the book I kept waiting for her to start preaching or pat herself on the back for her good deeds. It never happened. I was relieved because I don't like throwing books against walls! Even though she and I come from backgrounds that are practically polar opposite, I found I could relate to what she shared. Here goes a few quotes so you can judge for yourself if it is a book you would want to read. Re: Happiness I think one of the keys to happiness is accepting that I am never going to be perfectly happy. Life is uncomfortable. So I might as well get busy loving the people around me. I'm going to stop trying so hard to decide whether they are the "right people" for me and just take deep breaths and love my neighbors. I'm going to take care of my friends. I'm going to find peace in the 'burbs. I'm going to quit chasing happiness long enough to notice it smiling right at me. Re: Love The only meaningful thing we can offer one another is love. Not advice, not questions about our choices, not suggestions for the future, just love. Re: Criticism of her writing We are all trying to find the truth. So I try to see different points of view not as reasons to step back further into my corner, but as opportunities to take baby steps toward the middle of the ring-if for no other reason than to see my opponent a little closer. 4.5 stars More blog reviews

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    I read the entire book and read it quickly. However, I was left somewhat unimpressed. Disclaimer is that I have only read a handful of her blog posts linked from Faceboook recommendations. I have no ill-will toward her as a person or the charitable work I hear about her name associated with. This is a review of the actual book...as a book. Here's what I didn't like about her book. It's basically like reading a bunch of blog posts. But not really in order and without any specific flow. SO for me a I read the entire book and read it quickly. However, I was left somewhat unimpressed. Disclaimer is that I have only read a handful of her blog posts linked from Faceboook recommendations. I have no ill-will toward her as a person or the charitable work I hear about her name associated with. This is a review of the actual book...as a book. Here's what I didn't like about her book. It's basically like reading a bunch of blog posts. But not really in order and without any specific flow. SO for me as a reader, it didn't work. I would have been much better off reading one chapter a day over time instead of sitting down and reading it as a book. And since I don't know much about her, the "out of order" thing really was confusing. She talks about adoption multiple places, but never in order. And not having dated the chapters, I never knew what came first, what timeframe she was in, etc. I know many people get a lot of deep spiritual stuff out of it. For me, instead of being "holy" it was just really "holey". Too many missing pieces. Too many gaps. Again, I read the entire thing and found some stories amusing and others had good meaning. I just didn't enjoy it as a whole and don't feel that I must make sure everyone else out there reads it. I'd probably recommend, instead just check out her blog and read a few posts. It's probably about the same and will save you time on a waitlist or money.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book is junk! I can not believe people are raving about this. There is no substance in this book whatsoever! The writing is horrible, and the writer is completely crazy. Truly... this woman is nuts! The near-worship following Glennon has in her "monkees" is both disturbing and sickening. Ugh, please don't waste your time and get sucked into this black hole!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julie Biles

    Glennon Doyle Melton has a warm, inviting personality. The reader feels this when reading her blog posts. Melton is open and vulnerable: these qualities are so often missing in our relationships. So, I appreciate these valuable characteristics you see in her work. I felt waves of emotion as I read her stories: I was certainly entertained. This book is a compilation of personal, self-focused blog posts, but not a well-written book. It seems a bit concerning that while telling her stories, she so Glennon Doyle Melton has a warm, inviting personality. The reader feels this when reading her blog posts. Melton is open and vulnerable: these qualities are so often missing in our relationships. So, I appreciate these valuable characteristics you see in her work. I felt waves of emotion as I read her stories: I was certainly entertained. This book is a compilation of personal, self-focused blog posts, but not a well-written book. It seems a bit concerning that while telling her stories, she so often crosses a line and sets herself up, while likely unintentionally, as a theologian. Herein lies my first problem with this book. Many people reading this have possibly read very little and may even have no knowledge of the God of the Bible. These same people read this author's stories and adopt her glib light view of God. My second concern about this book is that the author takes eternal, holy stories and makes them about her. One example was the chapter when she tells the account of a very difficult time in her marriage. While I loved this redemptive narrative, it took an odd turn as she made the Easter story about her marriage. I would not recommend this book to anyone who might be vulnerable to following the whims and ideas of an individual who seems to have been given acclaimed credibility as more than a gifted story-teller. Glennon's knowledge is acquired from her own personal experience and this is not understood by every reader.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    3.5 stars I'm struggling a bit in reviewing this becaue I really loved it for the most part but there were aspects that didn't work for me. I love her overall themes of being honest, and taking ownership for your life. The essays focusing on her children, husband and sister were some of the best, in my opinion. The thing that fell flat for me was her focus on religion. I get it that religion is a big piece of her life and her story. Which is great. But, for those who are not 'religious' (me), it 3.5 stars I'm struggling a bit in reviewing this becaue I really loved it for the most part but there were aspects that didn't work for me. I love her overall themes of being honest, and taking ownership for your life. The essays focusing on her children, husband and sister were some of the best, in my opinion. The thing that fell flat for me was her focus on religion. I get it that religion is a big piece of her life and her story. Which is great. But, for those who are not 'religious' (me), it can get to be a bit too much. I'm quite spiritual but I'm not a Christian or a Muslim or a Buddhist, etc. I get the spiritual nature of her journey and appreciate her sharing it. In fact, I loved that she called out the fact that many Christians seem to forget the very teachings of Christ when they don't embrace other people whether they are 'good' or 'bad.' But, at one point, I foudn myself saying ok, I get it - you love God. You are religious. I GET IT. I wanted more of the other stuff about her life - which, frankly, speaks to her religion and it's impact in her life. Maybe it's just me but I wanted less overt religion and more of the day to day stories of her life. So, I'm rating this one 3.5 stars because it didn't completely resonate with me. On her blog, I can generally skip the essays that are 'too religious' for me but that wasn't as easy in this book. However, I highly recommend this book overall. Very raw and real.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie Ekkers

    I would give Glennon's blog five stars, but am only giving her book four, and have been wrestling with how this can be. I really, really like Glennon's blog in which she reveals everything about her history as a bulimic and addict and her life now as a sober writer, wife, and mother of three. I think Glennon has a lot of thoughtful things to say about parenting and faith in particular, that will resonate with and comfort many. C.S. Lewis wrote, "We read to know we are not alone." That's how read I would give Glennon's blog five stars, but am only giving her book four, and have been wrestling with how this can be. I really, really like Glennon's blog in which she reveals everything about her history as a bulimic and addict and her life now as a sober writer, wife, and mother of three. I think Glennon has a lot of thoughtful things to say about parenting and faith in particular, that will resonate with and comfort many. C.S. Lewis wrote, "We read to know we are not alone." That's how reading Glennon's work often makes me feel, which is a five-star feeling. A fair amount of what's in Carry On Warrior was first published on Glennon's blog. I think there are probably followers of hers who will like this aspect of the book. I think I came to it hoping there would be more here that was new. Still, I hope this book is widely read. Glennon is an accessible and thoughtful writer, who writes movingly of what she learns as she makes her way through all the beautiful and brutal things in a life.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ginny

    I'm so thankful to Glennon Doyle Melton who wrote this amazing book, Carry On Warrior, just for ME. How did she know I needed this Love Pep Talk right at this very moment in my life? However, it just so happens, she also wrote it for my Mom, my best friends, my Dad, my neighbors, my Pastor, my children and you. All of you. ALL of US. She tells her own, once private, very personal truths in this book. Nonetheless, the words she writes speak to the heart of anyone who reads it. She speaks to you th I'm so thankful to Glennon Doyle Melton who wrote this amazing book, Carry On Warrior, just for ME. How did she know I needed this Love Pep Talk right at this very moment in my life? However, it just so happens, she also wrote it for my Mom, my best friends, my Dad, my neighbors, my Pastor, my children and you. All of you. ALL of US. She tells her own, once private, very personal truths in this book. Nonetheless, the words she writes speak to the heart of anyone who reads it. She speaks to you through Carry On Warrior as if you're sharing a cup of tea with her on her sofa--honestly, graciously, hysterically funny and always thoughtfully reflective and accepting. Glennon finds meaning in the everyday obstacles we face as human beings. She beautifully illustrates how one's vulnerability and honesty are the very best parts of one's self. Our insides and flaws, the things we are most apt to keep secret, are what knits us together as humans who need each other. The more honest we are with one another, the more we realize we are so very much alike. Hence, by the end of her book, Glennon has unforcibly and humbly caused you to fall in love with her. Her voice is smartly unique in today's world of bloggers and do-anything-for-fame-rs. She makes you laugh out loud and read chapters over the phone to your best friend, then she turns around and causes you to cry out loud while sitting in the bleachers when you're supposed to be watching your son play hockey. The thing is, she's not an emotional manipulator. She's simply a brave truth-teller who has figured out the secret to experiencing real joy. Do what your Momma and God told you to do... BE YOURSELF. YOU ARE ENOUGH. And Glennon will show you how YOUR truths--all the amazing things about you the world has yet to learn, and all of your scariest feelings and thoughts you hide because you're afraid they aren't lovable enough--they are our common thread. Those vulnerable, soft spots are what makes us human. Unique and alike. "Both/and" as Glennon would say. We do belong to each other, Glennon. And I'm so very thankful and glad we do. LOVE.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    I know I have fallen in love with a book when I fall out of life - when I stop wife-ing, parenting, friending, Facebooking, etc. and just READ. I love those books dearly and Carry On, Warrior is definitely one of them. I have read Glennon's blog Momastery since 2009 and reading Carry On, Warrior was on one hand like reconnecting with an old friend, and on the other like discovering someone I'd never met before. Glennon speaks to the heart of how hard life can be - but also beautiful. It's ok if I know I have fallen in love with a book when I fall out of life - when I stop wife-ing, parenting, friending, Facebooking, etc. and just READ. I love those books dearly and Carry On, Warrior is definitely one of them. I have read Glennon's blog Momastery since 2009 and reading Carry On, Warrior was on one hand like reconnecting with an old friend, and on the other like discovering someone I'd never met before. Glennon speaks to the heart of how hard life can be - but also beautiful. It's ok if not every moment with your children, your husband, your family and friends is wrapped in perfection with a bow on top. Through her very funny stories and very touching insights I found myself not only loving her for her imperfections but loving myself more along the way as well. Your life will be better for reading Carry On, Warrior - at the end of the book I felt more connected, more loved, more accepted and more blessed. I did something I have NEVER done - I ordered a second copy. For if there's one thing I'm sure - I MUST pass this book onto my friends, but I couldn't bear to give my copy away. Carry On, Warrior!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    This is an autobiography of sorts. I wasn't sure what to expect with this book. I've never heard of the author before, but now I feel I know who she is. She is a mommy blogger, but not the kind you might think. This was laugh out loud funny. I read this at work and any spontaneous noise, (laughing, singing, coughing, etc) is frowned upon. I just couldn't help it though. It had me rolling out of my chair. I enjoyed her honest approach to motherhood, especially with her background. This felt so rea This is an autobiography of sorts. I wasn't sure what to expect with this book. I've never heard of the author before, but now I feel I know who she is. She is a mommy blogger, but not the kind you might think. This was laugh out loud funny. I read this at work and any spontaneous noise, (laughing, singing, coughing, etc) is frowned upon. I just couldn't help it though. It had me rolling out of my chair. I enjoyed her honest approach to motherhood, especially with her background. This felt so real to me, because as a mother, we all feel the need to hide the ugly things, but this author did not do this. She stepped up and owned them. She let her conversion to Jesus, guide her. I'll admit, she is not your normal hands folded, polite Christian. But that is okay with me. Her goal in writing this book was to help others feel better about that their lives, and she did that for me. So 4 stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jo Edwards

    I have been reading the Momastery blog since the day that Glennon Melton started it. I'm an artist and since because of her words and her actions, she inspired me to start my own blog where I did a piece of art every day for a year...throughout pregnancy and childbirth and having my first baby. I was incredibly proud of that accomplishment and I honestly couldn't have done it without Glennon and Momastery. Now after reading the Carry On Warrior, a whole new world of inspiration awaits. Glennon c I have been reading the Momastery blog since the day that Glennon Melton started it. I'm an artist and since because of her words and her actions, she inspired me to start my own blog where I did a piece of art every day for a year...throughout pregnancy and childbirth and having my first baby. I was incredibly proud of that accomplishment and I honestly couldn't have done it without Glennon and Momastery. Now after reading the Carry On Warrior, a whole new world of inspiration awaits. Glennon can reach inside my chest and cradle my broken heart, she can literally take words out of my mouth and thoughts out of my brain. I guess that means that there is a little bit of her inside us and a little of us inside her...it just proves her statement that we DO in fact "belong to each other." This book will break your heart, make you belly laugh, inspire you, change your perspective, make you dance, make you think, make you FEEL OKAY...you'll want to share it with EVERYONE you know...not just women. (I have read most of this book to my husband who is a big fan, not only because it's a great read, but because of how it helps me every day.) The writing is relatable, intelligent and graceful. Glennon drives deep into her relationships and shares her darkest secrets in a way that makes you say, "I have felt that way too, but I wouldn't have the guts to talk about it." I think because of that, you're glad SOMEone has the guts and it's liberating and exciting. It's real and touching, brave and victorious. I will read everything that Glennon puts out there. A must-read, I'm sharing with everyone kind of book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    steph

    I have conflicting feelings on this book. On one hand, I really enjoyed certain sections and I laughed pretty hard on her section regarding tooth brushing (I DON'T FLOSS DAILY EITHER EVEN THOUGH MY DENTIST REMINDS ME TO EVERY TIME I GO IN FOR MY 6 MONTH CHECKUP) and the part where her daughters were throwing a tantrum in Target and a police officer came over and told her girls they were "disturbing the peace and could they try to keep it down?" and her daughters instantly froze and quieted becau I have conflicting feelings on this book. On one hand, I really enjoyed certain sections and I laughed pretty hard on her section regarding tooth brushing (I DON'T FLOSS DAILY EITHER EVEN THOUGH MY DENTIST REMINDS ME TO EVERY TIME I GO IN FOR MY 6 MONTH CHECKUP) and the part where her daughters were throwing a tantrum in Target and a police officer came over and told her girls they were "disturbing the peace and could they try to keep it down?" and her daughters instantly froze and quieted because they thought they were going to go to jail and they begged their mom in the car not to tell Daddy they almost got arrested at Target. (This is why I will never have children. Because that part cracked me up. And I believe that scaring your child into quietness submission is a good tactic to use every once in awhile). BUT. A lot of these sections I recognized from her blog. And I've only been reading her blog for like a year and it's not a daily thing so the fact that I thought she had already covered at least 60% of this material in her blog felt a bit wrong to me. And, a bigger BUT, I'm not sure how much I like Glennon. Sure she is a fighter and I appreciate and like the fact that she puts herself and her past out there, warts and battle scars and all but I'm not sure, if we were ever to meet in a room setting I would like her all that much. She came across in this book a little bit too much "ME ME ME" for my taste. Which, I get it, it's an autobiography about her life but still. When you are in a relationship and you have children there are other people to consider rather then yourself and I feel sometimes she does not do that (or at least, that is what this book made me feel about her personality). And I hesitate to call this a book because things didn't go in a chronological way. It was mostly blog like sections that went under a certain category all bundled together. (And, slight petty, grievance, why does she call her parents, Trisha and Bubba? Just call them Mom and Dad. We know they are your parents!) But I'm still giving this a 3 star rating because it interests me enough to have me continue reading to the end. Plus, she finally told her readers in this book exactly what was THE NEWS between her and her husband that happened back in April that she posted about on her blog. I have been wondering since then because bloggers who post post after post after post about THE NEWS but don't go into detail for the sake of their families privacy annoy me. Just tell me the news so I can move on with my life and stop wondering(for those wondering, her husband cheated on her early on in their marriage which she found out in their therapy session in April and which they are now working through). See, not so bad/interesting. It's just she NEVER said and I WANTED to know. This what happens when you post everything about yourself on the web. You try and keep things private and it doesn't work because your readers want to know because they feel invested in you. I wanted to know and reading this book told me so I'm glad I read it. (and wow, I just sounded totally shallow there) (and yes, there was some Christian stuff in here but anyone who has every read her site knows that about her so it wasn't unexpected in her book) Oh, and I believe this is my 4th book by a blogger that I have read in the last year and a half. Either bloggers need to stop getting book deals or I need to stop reading them. Because I think it's becoming a bit of a habit now.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Awwwtrouble

    I've been a fan of Momastery for a while, and knew I wanted to read the book. I think she's a good writer, very thought provoking, and I think she does good things. I also think she is a master at telling universal truths, while having most readers think she is revealing a lot about herself when is reality she reveals almost nothing personal. There's something about her "shameless truth telling" that rings a little disingenuous to me. For example, she writes many times about her lengthy arrest r I've been a fan of Momastery for a while, and knew I wanted to read the book. I think she's a good writer, very thought provoking, and I think she does good things. I also think she is a master at telling universal truths, while having most readers think she is revealing a lot about herself when is reality she reveals almost nothing personal. There's something about her "shameless truth telling" that rings a little disingenuous to me. For example, she writes many times about her lengthy arrest record and how it's prevented her from several things (like adopting). But she never reveals in the book why she arrested, for what, and whether she was charged. There's more detail within her blog, but not much. I think she may have a record of disorderly conduct, at the worst, which kind of makes me yawn a little. That's a lot of drama around not much at all. I also think it is really really important to her that she is pretty and thin, and she pretty much admits as much, which is one thing, but people who really really care about being pretty and thin tend to not be people with whom I care to be friends. I've read other reviews that suggest this is about 50% new info and 50% from the blog, but I think it's more like 75% blog material and perhaps 25% new/edited - it read very much like I've read it all before. I do not criticize her for putting it all out there (since I think she doesn't actually put much out there), but there are some things that just strike a bad note - I also tend to dislike people for whom learned helplessness is a thing. I mean really, she doesn't have a single cooking pan? It just seems exaggerated for effect. And the moving thing - she moves her family to a small town and everyone thrives, including her, and then she moves them all back to the burbs 6 months later - why? And then she moves them all to Florida, why again? There's a layer of selfishness there that is unappealing. And, if what she writes is true, perhaps she is one of those who foists her helplessness onto her children, burdening them beyond what they should know about life. I actually did not intend for this to be so critical - I do still follow her, after all. Just perhaps not quite so slavishly as her Monkee acolytes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    I received this book as a Goodreads First Reads giveaway! I work with people who are seeking recovery in their lives everyday and this book was a breath of fresh air! The author uses fantastic humor when sharing her personal challenges and ultimately says out loud what everyone else is thinking. I love this woman!! I could relate to almost every situation she presented and could not wait to read on. The book is non-threatening and non-judging and would make a great resource for any woman who is I received this book as a Goodreads First Reads giveaway! I work with people who are seeking recovery in their lives everyday and this book was a breath of fresh air! The author uses fantastic humor when sharing her personal challenges and ultimately says out loud what everyone else is thinking. I love this woman!! I could relate to almost every situation she presented and could not wait to read on. The book is non-threatening and non-judging and would make a great resource for any woman who is going through their personal recovery now or in past or wants to support others that are. Glennon Melton has a way of sharing her spiritual supports in a non preachy tone, which means the world for someone like me who is not practicing in any religious faith. Anyone who is wanting to read a true life, heartfelt and motivational story needs to read this book. I was left with many thoughts of self-reflection, ideas on how to be more positive in my world and how to embrace the world as we know it. I think it takes a tonne of guts and bravery to put yourself out there and tell others about the true you! Glennon Melton does this with boldness and laughter with many sprinkles of reality and 100% humility. 5 Stars for me! So glad I had the opportunity and will highly recommend!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    As I was reading this I couldn't decide whether to give it 5 stars or 1 star...but the last chapter of the book was so sacrilegious I have to give it 1 star. While there are so many well written messages about being a great friend, wife & mother - the theology of this book is so warped I can't support it. God is NOT s/he, whatever you feel in your heart. I think life is a little more black/white than the author supports. I continue to follow the blog for the great humour & thoughtful mes As I was reading this I couldn't decide whether to give it 5 stars or 1 star...but the last chapter of the book was so sacrilegious I have to give it 1 star. While there are so many well written messages about being a great friend, wife & mother - the theology of this book is so warped I can't support it. God is NOT s/he, whatever you feel in your heart. I think life is a little more black/white than the author supports. I continue to follow the blog for the great humour & thoughtful messages, but the book was disappointing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    This book seems to have a polarizing effect on most readers, and I would be in that camp. I want to give this book one star, and maybe 3.5 stars. Even as I write this I don't know where I'll land. She's really setting herself up as a self help guru, though she professes the opposite. The chapter that really repelled me was the "Coughy, Smelly Guy", in which she goes to yoga and is initially repelled by the man that takes yoga with her, and who, you guessed it, coughs and smells. Then she suggests This book seems to have a polarizing effect on most readers, and I would be in that camp. I want to give this book one star, and maybe 3.5 stars. Even as I write this I don't know where I'll land. She's really setting herself up as a self help guru, though she professes the opposite. The chapter that really repelled me was the "Coughy, Smelly Guy", in which she goes to yoga and is initially repelled by the man that takes yoga with her, and who, you guessed it, coughs and smells. Then she suggests that he is her cross to bare to be more patient. My first thought? You narcissistic, self-centered cow. What if that guy can only find comfort in yoga because he works with autistic children and is constantly grappling with the colds that many young kiddos carry? What if he's struggling to make it through a long standing illness and the only medicine that works for him comes out in his sweat and, to his embarrassment, makes him smell, and one of the few places he feels he can relax and not be judged is his yoga class. Maybe none of these things are true, but if she's going to ascend the pulpit, I expect her to be taking the high road instead of making it all about herself. I'm totally understanding of her frustration, but if you're going to take the time to write about it, then take some time to think about your response. The author also, in a book that holds honesty high, dedicates an entire chapter to a story deceiving her husband that she's vacuuming the carpet. She gets her daughter to make rows in the carpet with her baby carriage to make it look like the carpet has been vacuumed. How about just freaking vacuuming? Or just asking her husband to help? You know, be *honest*. Both my wife and I work full time and I make breakfast, tidy, do the laundry half the time and yes, sometimes, vacuum. Despite *all* of this, there are some gems of humor and wisdom in here. Observations on honesty and breaking through the thin veneer that sometimes separates us and prevents real, true communication, but I can't recommend them because I'd prefer that someone found that information elsewhere, someplace where it isn't seasoned, admittedly sparingly, with contradiction and judgment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I started reading Glennon's blog over a year ago when I stumbled on her "Don't Carpe Diem" essay, which articulated some of the challenges I was facing in motherhood. Momastery (not mom-mastery, but like monastery - a sanctuary for moms) has been on my Reader feed ever since, and I have come to love Glennon's mantras, like "We can do hard things," "We belong to each other" and "Love wins." Glennon has a way of being hilariously self-deprecating, brutally honest, and joyously uplifting. Glennon m I started reading Glennon's blog over a year ago when I stumbled on her "Don't Carpe Diem" essay, which articulated some of the challenges I was facing in motherhood. Momastery (not mom-mastery, but like monastery - a sanctuary for moms) has been on my Reader feed ever since, and I have come to love Glennon's mantras, like "We can do hard things," "We belong to each other" and "Love wins." Glennon has a way of being hilariously self-deprecating, brutally honest, and joyously uplifting. Glennon may not hold the exact same beliefs as I do, but I like seeing the world through her eyes and feeling part of the momastery sisterhood. I was not surprised that a large percentage of the book's content was essays that I'd already read on the blog. For that reason I kept feeling like "yep, I've read this before." I had a few issues with the organization of the essays, and I don't know if I liked this more or less than I would have as a first-time reader. I admire Glennon's mission to be a truth teller and hope spreader, and I'm sure this book is fulfilling that goal.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Holtz

    I somehow wasn't familiar with Glennon's blog (clearly, I'm living under a rock), so I wasn't exactly sure what to expect when I got a copy of this book from NetGalley. It turned out to be a complete gift of brilliance & laughter & kindred spirit tears. This book is amazing. Glennon isn't a perfect/stepford/annoying mommy blogger. She's real. Honest. Messy. Reading Carry On Warrior had me shaking my head YES! in the knowing and the relating. Sharing her own war stories of motherhood is a I somehow wasn't familiar with Glennon's blog (clearly, I'm living under a rock), so I wasn't exactly sure what to expect when I got a copy of this book from NetGalley. It turned out to be a complete gift of brilliance & laughter & kindred spirit tears. This book is amazing. Glennon isn't a perfect/stepford/annoying mommy blogger. She's real. Honest. Messy. Reading Carry On Warrior had me shaking my head YES! in the knowing and the relating. Sharing her own war stories of motherhood is an act of bravery that I wish more Moms would take on. I hope that this book is read & talked about & shared.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adrianne

    In Carry On, Warrior, author Glennon Doyle Melton tells shameless truths about how beautiful and brutal life can be. When Melton bravely confesses forbidden truths about motherhood, marriage, and friendship, she lets the rest of us off the hook. She is a brilliant storyteller who is able to turn hilarious and sometimes heartbreaking stories into good-natured winks. Melton is wickedly funny without being wicked; her humor is infused with warmth and wonder. Carry On, Warrior is also the most power In Carry On, Warrior, author Glennon Doyle Melton tells shameless truths about how beautiful and brutal life can be. When Melton bravely confesses forbidden truths about motherhood, marriage, and friendship, she lets the rest of us off the hook. She is a brilliant storyteller who is able to turn hilarious and sometimes heartbreaking stories into good-natured winks. Melton is wickedly funny without being wicked; her humor is infused with warmth and wonder. Carry On, Warrior is also the most powerful, realistic testament to faith that I have ever read. I love this book and its author very, very much.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I love Glennon's philosophy on life. Too many people have carefully-curated social media profiles that make their life look perfect. It's not only a lie, it makes other people feel terrible for not being so pulled together. Glennon's rejects that, instead calling on women to be more open and honest about how hard life really can be. Not everything is Pinterest or Instagram-worthy in our lives and we should embrace and lean into the struggles we all face. She herself lives that philosophy by open I love Glennon's philosophy on life. Too many people have carefully-curated social media profiles that make their life look perfect. It's not only a lie, it makes other people feel terrible for not being so pulled together. Glennon's rejects that, instead calling on women to be more open and honest about how hard life really can be. Not everything is Pinterest or Instagram-worthy in our lives and we should embrace and lean into the struggles we all face. She herself lives that philosophy by openly discussing the demons of her past (alcoholism, eating disorders, and drug abuse) and the current challenges she faces (marriage issues, raising three kids). I found her honesty refreshing and inspirational, really. I also enjoy her take on Christianity. She isn't preachy or evangelical. She's progressive and thinks Christianity should be open and inclusive, not clique-y and exclusive. As a liberal Christian myself, it's such a nice change from the extremely right-wing, conservative type of Christianity that dominates the news. Here's a Christian woman saying that Christianity should be about love, not about following certain arcane maxims that don't apply to modern life. She espouses a Christianity where it isn't enough to be 'tolerant,' but where we should love and embrace everyone exactly as they are, regardless of their gender, age, sexuality, race, past experiences, what have you. It's great. I don't agree with everything in the book, but as Glennon says, you don't have to agree with everything some says to love them. And it's hard to dislike her and doubt her sincerity. She does come across as extremely extroverted which can be a little much for this introvert, but overall, her book is refreshing and honest in a way that so many of us in this age of Facebook aren't.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joy Kirkreit

    Hmmm. I had to read half the book before Glennon became really likable to me. I couldn't really relate to her the first half...with her little fit about her husband not throwing her a big birthday surprise, her philosophy of "living out loud" and being an open book, and her ME, ME, ME. I've always wondered: does everything always need to be talked about? Does everything have to "posted" or blogged about? I instead wanted to read about her sister working against injustice in Africa. I started to f Hmmm. I had to read half the book before Glennon became really likable to me. I couldn't really relate to her the first half...with her little fit about her husband not throwing her a big birthday surprise, her philosophy of "living out loud" and being an open book, and her ME, ME, ME. I've always wondered: does everything always need to be talked about? Does everything have to "posted" or blogged about? I instead wanted to read about her sister working against injustice in Africa. I started to find Glennon a tad annoying and a touch narcissistic. I didn't understand why this book was so pumped up by so many women. But THEN..! I read the letter she wrote to her son...and then her take on humility and confidence being different sides of the same coin..and then about love being the ultimate goal. That's when I finally said, ok, I'm on board with this. I understand now that she had to bear her whole truth in order to be free and heal from her wounds. And I understand too that not everyone operates the same way but we're all just as worthy and loved. 3.5 stars :) “I think one of the keys to happiness is accepting that I am never going to be perfectly happy. Life is uncomfortable. So I might as well get busy loving the people around me. I’m going to stop trying so hard to decide whether they are the “right people” for me and just take deep breaths and love my neighbors. I’m going to take care of my friends. I’m going to find peace in the ’burbs. I’m going to quit chasing happiness long enough to notice it smiling right at me.”

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lori Hinnant

    I know- the title. You likely have the impression that this is a hokey self-help book you don't want to read. It's not, and you do. Not only do you want to read this book, but you should read this book. It will make you better at life. (And let me point out, this is coming from a girl who DOES NOT read nonfiction.) Glennon advocates for authenticity, connection, and hope, all with grace and a liberal dose of humor. She explores BIG topics like faith and love without preaching or pretension. Befo I know- the title. You likely have the impression that this is a hokey self-help book you don't want to read. It's not, and you do. Not only do you want to read this book, but you should read this book. It will make you better at life. (And let me point out, this is coming from a girl who DOES NOT read nonfiction.) Glennon advocates for authenticity, connection, and hope, all with grace and a liberal dose of humor. She explores BIG topics like faith and love without preaching or pretension. Before I was even halfway through Carry On, Warrior, I'd made several visits to Amazon, sending copies to my people. Thank you, Glennon, for sharing yourself and your wisdom in this beautiful book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Glennon Doyle Melton is a new author for me and I did not know that she has a blog or writes for Oprah Magazine. Man, oh, man she tells it like it is. Sometimes I wasn't sure if she was exaggerating and putting in humor or if she was telling it like it truly is. For example, how do you have three children, a husband and no pans in the kitchen? Oh well, on to her next book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Melosh

    Engaging voice, and moving affirmation of the power of vulnerable love. But it's essentially a retread of her blogs, and published as a book, the collection shows the limits of blog form...short takes that don't go deep, suggestive but without much sustained argument.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    I made a mistake. I read this book while concurrently reading the latest from Anne Lamott, and a book by Buddhist Pema Chödrön. As such, the tone of this book was thrown into immediate contrast. Where Lamott and Chödrön seem to speak to the reader as though across cups of hot tea, coziness, and quiet contemplation (with some choice words now and then; honestly, all their words seem carefully chosen, plucked and sown after much consideration), Melton is all bippity-boppity here-and-then-there aren I made a mistake. I read this book while concurrently reading the latest from Anne Lamott, and a book by Buddhist Pema Chödrön. As such, the tone of this book was thrown into immediate contrast. Where Lamott and Chödrön seem to speak to the reader as though across cups of hot tea, coziness, and quiet contemplation (with some choice words now and then; honestly, all their words seem carefully chosen, plucked and sown after much consideration), Melton is all bippity-boppity here-and-then-there aren't-I-funny wow loud crazy messed up meeeeee! Even her essay about zen was exhausting. Zen! She's bad at things, but then acts like they can't change. She doesn't have a kitchen pan, so.....no kitchen pans forever. It's baffling. Just fix your problem! Just fix it! Get a pan! If you're bad at hostessing, learn how, don't just invite people over being like lol look at what a bad hostess I am, bring food and chairs because I'm a bad hostess! Fix your problems, Melton. Don't just wallow in them like a pig in shit. I get it, the shit is your meal ticket, the mud is the way you pay the bills and keep the Momastery money rolling in. We all do what we have to do. If you fixed everything you'd have nothing left to write about. But it doesn't make it not-annoying and not-exhausting to read. My eyes get tired from rolling after enough "but you could fix this" sighs. Not only that though, but it's as though everyone's story belongs to Melton. In her essay on Zen, she breezily recounts her Sister's story of a woman whose five-year-old daughter was raped, but it's *Melton* who finds life "constantly and excruciatingly difficult." Sit down, Melton. But instead, she goes on to involve Elie Wiesel, and two paragraphs later, explains that this (JEWISH!) suffering is why Christianity is real. No Melton. Sit the fuck down. But no, she keeps going! She imagines sitting down with Wiesel, so he could tell her about his suffering, SO SHE CAN SHOW HIM PICTURES OF CRUCIFIED CHRIST. I wish I were joking. But no, this is a thing she wrote, a thing multiple people had to see pre-publication, and nobody ever said, "You know, this seems really, really inappropriate." It's like she feels entitled to inspect and use other people's wounds as a way to understand her life, and to create. After writing about how she and Wiesel would chat, she says what beauty there is in pain, blah blah blah. She never sits down. She never seemed to think, wow, things are terrible, maybe this is a certain kind of terrible that I do not have a right to blather on about breezily in my bloggy woggy book, maybe I should say Wiesel and pain are why I [a white Christian lady who doesn't seem to have suffered all that badly in comparison to Elie Wiesel or the African mother] write. Reading Melton was also an exercise in annoyance from the bouncing around with no context or timeframes, the all-caps, the spirituality-lite. Blog posts that work when they're written in a slapdash fashion don't work so well when they're book chapters; there's an expectation of thought when it comes to short essays, whereas a blog post can be forgiven being quick and easily digestible because there's an ongoing story, there's an ongoing conversation with the reader. But in a book, that intimate back-and-forth is gone, and so you're left with a book that imitates the blog content, but without the medium that makes it work as a blog. Look, I know women who write about spirituality are always going to find themselves critiqued because women can't be real theologians, etc. in the eyes of a lot of people. So I get that. But not every spiritual woman writer is going to be Anne Lamott either, and pity the fool who thinks of herself as being on the same level. Which Melton seems to think she is. Reading Lamott is calming. Reading Melton is exhausting. I never think, gosh, what a trial to be friends or family with Lamott. I mean, maybe being her daughter-in-law would be difficult. Some Assembly Required made me sort of pity that woman. But nearly every essay in this book made me think being her friend or family must be a slight case of marathon exhaustion. And if that's just how it is and they take that with the good, bless them, but as a reader, I have no such desire or obligation to continue the relationship via reading. I'm not going to go into the adoption language she uses, about "her" babies, about naming a child before they were part of her family, about all of that. The adoption landscape is one wracked by ethical dubiousness, but her approach to it -- very Melton-centered, all about her crushing desire for a baby (this is always hard to read from someone who never had to suffer infertility, but that's a ramble for another review!)...but when her grief is that she didn't get to send a Christmas card that said Happy Holidays from the Melton Pot, when her prosepctive adoptive son was left to continue to be in an orphanage, her grief is strangely misplaced. Her grief is for herself, here, it seems. Not Hills. "It is official: I did not get the life I wanted." Oof, lady. That was your takeaway when Rwanda closed adoptions, including that of Hills? Not to mention, this is rich coming from someone with so much. Three effortless children (presumably, certainly the first, she makes that clear). But the loss of a potential fourth is what makes you not get the life you want. Okay. And Hills? His future? Oh, but that Christmas card caption! Hills and his future aren't mentioned again. It's okay, she got her blog, her babies! It's fine! They adopt a highway! I'm sure that's great for Hills! Finally look -- I probably have a bit of Melton in me too. Maybe her constant need to tie everything back to her is something I do sometimes too. Maybe I'm a little bippity-boppity sometimes. Maybe there have been times when I've thought about adoption as a way to get "my baby" without thinking of the trauma that would necessarily have to take place for that to happen. I have a daughter through IVF, maybe I should be happy that I got what I wanted, right? I got the life I wanted. That Melton bemoans her "fate" of three when she wanted a fourth maybe stings too close to my own situation. I'm trying to be generous. I could forgive the adoption essay. I could. But then I remember the Elie Wiesel essay. Without the Elie Wiesel essay, maybe I could soften to this book. But that pushed me over into no.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vikki

    i can imagine what the reviewers are saying about this book, which, when you get right down to it, is basically a compilation of blog posts arranged in a more or less coherent fashion and preaching a kind of feel-good, self-help spirituality tailor-made for the mommy-blog reader (i didn't decide ahead of time to cram four hyphens into that sentence, but i kind of appreciate the symmetry). because i fancy myself a fairly literate, intellectual person with more than my share of religious contempt, i can imagine what the reviewers are saying about this book, which, when you get right down to it, is basically a compilation of blog posts arranged in a more or less coherent fashion and preaching a kind of feel-good, self-help spirituality tailor-made for the mommy-blog reader (i didn't decide ahead of time to cram four hyphens into that sentence, but i kind of appreciate the symmetry). because i fancy myself a fairly literate, intellectual person with more than my share of religious contempt, there were a few times while i was reading this book when i felt vaguely embarrassed by how much i was enjoying it. the fact is, i am precisely the sort of reader to whom glennon melton is speaking, and i love what she has to say. i only came to the momastery blog fairly recently, when melton acknowledged that she had separated from her husband (and I have to admit, a big part of my interest in the book arose out of curiosity over whether she'd reveal any more about that situation in the book than she has on the blog. non-spoiler alert: she doesn't.). i don't know whether longtime readers of the blog will find that a lot of this material is familiar, but i suspect they will, as several pieces were familiar to me. melton is a mother of three, a recovering alcoholic and bulimic, a sort-of-born-again christian (with a side of buddhism) with a history of depression and other troubles; since i am some of those things myself, i identified with a lot of her struggles and found her voice and her message beautiful, inspiring, energizing, and encouraging. i suspect that people who are not any of those things might find it trite, saccharine, and cliche. whatever. a couple of the essays left me flat, but for the most part i found melton's book deeply moving, a call to action on behalf of communities and the less fortunate, and to gratitude for what's right in front of us.

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